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Steve Kemp: Lumail has IMAP .. almost

Planet HantsLUG - Sat, 16/01/2016 - 12:16

A couple of years ago I was dissatisfied with mutt, mostly because the mutt-sidebar patch was dropped from the Debian package. That lead to me thinking "How hard can it be to write a modal, console-based mail-client?"

It turns out writing a client is pretty simple if you limit yourself solely to Maildirs, and as I typically read my mail over SSH on the mailhost itself that suited me pretty well.

Recently I restarted the mail-client. Putting it together from scratch to simplify the implementation, and unify a lot of the adhoc scripting which is provided by Lua. People seem to like the client, but the single largest complaint was "Can't use it - no IMAP."

This week I've mostly been adding IMAP support, and today I'll commit the last few bits that mean it is roughly-functional:

  • Connecting to a mail-server works.
  • Getting the folders works.
  • Getting the messages works.

The outstanding niggles will be relating to getting/setting the new/read/seen/unseen flags, and similar. But I'm pleased that the job wasn't insurmountable.

I've used libcurl to provide the IMAP functionality because most of the IMAP libraries I looked at were big, scary, and complex. Using curl to access IMAP is pretty neat, simple, and straightforward. The downside is you're making a lot of "http" requests. So I might need to revisit things.

Happily my imap wrapper doesn't need much functionality. So if I can find a better library swapping it out will be simple.

In conclusion: Lumail almost has IMAP support, and that might mean it'll be more useful to others.

Categories: LUG Community Blogs

Debian Bits: New Debian Developers and Maintainers (November and December 2015)

Planet HantsLUG - Tue, 12/01/2016 - 11:30

The following contributors got their Debian Developer accounts in the last two months:

  • Stein Magnus Jodal (jodal)
  • Prach Pongpanich (prach)
  • Markus Koschany (apo)
  • Bernhard Schmidt (berni)
  • Uwe Kleine-König (ukleinek)
  • Timo Weingärtner (tiwe)
  • Sebastian Andrzej Siewior (bigeasy)
  • Mattia Rizzolo (mattia)
  • Alexandre Viau (aviau)
  • Lev Lamberov (dogsleg)
  • Adam Borowski (kilobyte)
  • Chris Boot (bootc)

The following contributors were added as Debian Maintainers in the last two months:

  • Alf Gaida
  • Andrew Ayer
  • Marcio de Souza Oliveira
  • Alexandre Detiste
  • Dave Hibberd
  • Andreas Boll
  • Punit Agrawal
  • Edward Betts
  • Shih-Yuan Lee
  • Ivan Udovichenko
  • Andrew Kelley
  • Benda Xu
  • Russell Sim
  • Paulo Roberto Alves de Oliveira
  • Marc Fournier
  • Scott Talbert
  • Sergio Durigan Junior
  • Guillaume Turri
  • Michael Lustfield

Congratulations!

Categories: LUG Community Blogs

Mick Morgan: sign this now

Planet ALUG - Mon, 11/01/2016 - 22:03

I am a paying member of both Amnesty International and the Open Rights Group. Both those organisations, along with many other Civil Rights organisations, technology companies and concerned individuals are signatories to an open letter to Governments across the world demanding that we retain the right to strong encryption in order to protect our privacy. That letter says:

  • Governments should not ban or otherwise limit user access to encryption in any form or otherwise prohibit the implementation or use of encryption by grade or type;
  • Governments should not mandate the design or implementation of “backdoors” or vulnerabilities into tools, technologies, or services;
  • Governments should not require that tools, technologies, or services are designed or developed to allow for third-party access to unencrypted data or encryption keys;
  • Governments should not seek to weaken or undermine encryption standards or intentionally influence the establishment of encryption standards except to promote a higher level of information security. No government should mandate insecure encryption algorithms, standards, tools, or technologies; and
  • Governments should not, either by private or public agreement, compel or pressure an entity to engage in activity that is inconsistent with the above tenets.

I’ve signed. You should too.

Categories: LUG Community Blogs

I’m a good fit from DnBHeaven. I knew that already.

Planet SurreyLUG - Fri, 08/01/2016 - 11:39

#lastfm tells me I’m a good fit from DnBHeaven. Luckily, I love DnB, so this
seems apt.

 

The post I’m a good fit from DnBHeaven. I knew that already. appeared first on life at warp.

Categories: LUG Community Blogs

Mick Morgan: idiotic

Planet ALUG - Thu, 07/01/2016 - 14:54

Today’s Register has an article about the UK Internet Service Providers Association written evidence to the Parliamentary Joint Committee on the Draft Investigatory Powers Bill.

I don’t wish to comment on that evidence here, Adrian Kennard has already provided much useful comment on the failings of the Draft Bill. My purpose in this post to highlight the absurdity of the Parliamentary Committee’s request that the ISPA evidence be withdrawn from it’s Website. The Register article ends with this update:

ISPA contacted The Register after the publication of this story to inform us: “ISPA was requested to remove the written evidence it submitted to the Joint Committee on the Investigatory Powers Bill from the ISPA website by the Joint Committee. Their guidance states that submissions become the property of the Committee and should not be published elsewhere until the Committee has done so itself.”

As of now (14.30 on 7 January) that evidence is still on the ISPA Website. Even if removed, it will still, of course, be available from a huge range of sources such as search engine caches (apologies for the google reference, but it is the obvious one). Or you could get it here.

The point is, once such a document has been published electronically on the net, no-one, but no-one, can put the genie back in the bottle and unpublish it.

The officials supporting the Joint Parliamentary Committee should know that. And if they don’t then I would submit that they are not technically competent enough to be supporting the Committee.

Categories: LUG Community Blogs

Modern consumerism: using HD YouTube reviews of 4K TVs to help choose.

Planet SurreyLUG - Wed, 06/01/2016 - 18:52

Modern consumerism: using HD YouTube reviews of 4K TVs to help choose.

As it is, my vote went with Samsung this time around.  Sorry Panasonic/Sony/etc…

http://www.s21.com/samsung-ue50ju6800.htm

 

The post Modern consumerism: using HD YouTube reviews of 4K TVs to help choose. appeared first on life at warp.

Categories: LUG Community Blogs

Really love the #LibreOffice 5 #UI. So clean. http://www.libreoffice.org/

Planet SurreyLUG - Wed, 06/01/2016 - 11:30

Really love the #LibreOffice 5 #UI.  So clean.  http://www.libreoffice.org/

The community has done a great job on this wonderful, #free, #opensource software.

The post Really love the #LibreOffice 5 #UI. So clean. http://www.libreoffice.org/ appeared first on life at warp.

Categories: LUG Community Blogs

Bring-A-Box, Saturday 9 Jan 2016, Lion Brewery, Ash

Surrey LUG - Sun, 03/01/2016 - 15:08
Start: 2016-01-09 12:00 End: 2016-01-09 12:00

We have regular sessions on the second Saturday of each month. Bring a 'box', bring a notebook, bring anything that might run Linux, or just bring yourself and enjoy socialising/learning/teaching or simply chilling out!

This month's meeting is at the Lion Brewery Pub in Ash, Surrey.

New members are very welcome. We're not a cliquey bunch, so you won't feel out of place! Usually between 15 and 30 people come along.

Categories: LUG Community Blogs

Steve Engledow (stilvoid): TODO

Planet ALUG - Sat, 02/01/2016 - 22:35

As last year, here's this year's TODO as a diff with last time.

New Year's Resolutions
  • Read even more (fiction and non-fiction)

    I'm certainly doing plenty of this now :)

  • Write at least one short story

  • Write some moreand release at least one games

  • Go horse riding

  • Learn some more turkish

  • Keep learning languages

    I've been having a good time learning with Duolingo recently and have found learning more than one language is helping recall in all of them.

  • Play a lot more guitar

    Lots more guitar played in 2015 than 2014 and it ought to continue through this year.

  • Lose at least a stone (in weight, from myself)

    Utter fail on this one. I've put weight on. Efforts shall be redoubled and all that.

  • Receive a lot less email

    I'm gettting a lot less email these days.

  • Blog more

    I'd say it's been about the same but I'm happy with that.

  • Write more software

  • Release more software

    Definitely nailed these two.

  • Be a better husband and father

    Pfft. I'm the best, natch.

  • Improve or replace the engine I use for my blog

    Much happier with how this works now.

  • Contribute more to existing open source projects

  • Pass all of the AWS certification exams

    Especially as I'm going to be working there this year ;)

Categories: LUG Community Blogs

Ubuntu Simple Scan HP All in One

Planet SurreyLUG - Sat, 02/01/2016 - 12:14

At home we have an HP OfficeJet J6410 printer, which has worked brilliantly for years. Unlike every previous printer we've owned, this printer sits happily on our network and seems perfectly content to be used only very occasionally, whereon it willingly responds with decent quality prints and scans.

I have set up the printer with a static IP address and so the scanning is managed via the web interface http://192.168.0.100/webScan, whereon the scanned image opens a new tab in the browser, enabling you to save to wherever.

This printing and scanning Nirvana hit a road bump today, when it just instantly went to "Scan done" and failed to actually do anything. Rebooting the laptop, the printer and clearing temporary internet files all failed to resolve the problem, as did changing from Chrome to Firefox.

In desperation I tried running Ubuntu Simple Scan, but predictably enough it did not find the printer. A quick Internet search took me to this excellent Ubunutu community page.

I opened a terminal and typed:

$ hp-makeuri 192.168.0.100 CUPS URI: hp:/net/Officejet_J6400_series?ip=192.168.0.100 SANE URI: hpaio:/net/Officejet_J6400_series?ip=192.168.0.100 HP Fax URI: hpfax:/net/Officejet_J6400_series?ip=192.168.0.100 Done.

I then typed (taking the SANE URI from above):

$ simple-scan hpaio:/net/Officejet_J6400_series?ip=192.168.0.100

And it worked perfectly! Flushed with success I read on to see how to make this a permanent fixture, and it turned out that all I needed to do was configure the CUPS URI for the printer itself (it was previously set to something like socket://192.168.0.100):

$ vim /etc/cups/printers.com DeviceURI hp:/net/Officejet_J6400_series?ip=192.168.0.100

And now simply running Ubuntu Simple Scan works perfectly.

Thank you Ubuntu community!

Categories: LUG Community Blogs

Steve Kemp: Restoring my system .. worked

Planet HantsLUG - Sat, 02/01/2016 - 08:52

A while back I wrote about some issues with converting a two-disk RAID system to a one-disk system, but just to recap:

  • We knew were were moving to Finland.
  • The shared/main computer we used in the UK was old and slow.
  • A new computer in Finland would be more expensive than it should be.
  • Equally transporting a big computer from the UK would also be silly.

In the end we bought a small form-factor PC, with only a single drive and I moved one of the two drives from the old machine into it. Then converted it to run happily with only a single drive, and not email every day to say "device missing".

So there things stood, we had a desktop with a single drive, and I ensured that I took full daily backup via attic.

Over Chrismas the two-year old drive failed. To the extent I couldn't even get it to be recognized by the BIOS, and thus couldn't pull data off it. Time to test my backups in anger! I bought a new drive, installed a minimal installation of the Jessie release of Debian onto the system, and then ran:

cd / .. restore latest backup ..

Two days later I'd pulled 1.3Tb over the network, and once I fixed up grub, /etc/fstab, and a couple of niggles it all just worked. Rebooted to make sure the temporary.home hostname, etc, was all gone and life was good.

Restored backup! No errors! No data-loss! Perfect!

The backup-script I use every day was very very good at making sure nothing was missed:

attic create --stats --checkpoint-interval=7200 attic@${remote}:/attic/storage::${host}-$(date +%Y-%m-%d-%H) --exclude=/proc \ --exclude=/sys \ --exclude=/run \ --exclude=/dev \ --exclude=/tmp \ --exclude=/var/tmp \ --exclude=/var/log \ /

In other news I published my module for controlling the new smart lights I've bought

Categories: LUG Community Blogs

Mick Morgan: a bad way to end the year

Planet ALUG - Fri, 01/01/2016 - 19:41

Sadly, I read today that Ian Murdock, the “Ian” in Debian, died on Monday, 28 December 2015. He was only 42 years old. Various reports indicate that he had been distressed for some time before his death. The tweets reportedly from Murdock’s twitter account shortly before his death are very disturbing.

Murdock’s contribution to the FLOSS community was immense. The operating system he created with “Deb”, Debra Lynn, his then girlfriend, is the foundation upon which much of today’s internet infrastructure is built. Ubuntu, one of the most popular desktop linux distros, is itself built upon debian. This blog, and all of my web, mail and other servers is built upon debian. His legacy will endure.

Murdock left a wife and two young children. He died much, much, too young.

Categories: LUG Community Blogs

Rebooting into a New Year

Planet SurreyLUG - Fri, 01/01/2016 - 18:12

I used to typically find New Year celebrations a mixed blessing.

Sometimes they can remind you of all the good, great, sad and bad events of the concluding year, in a way that makes you grateful to be alive and with loved ones.  Other times, the gratitude can give way to pensiveness, reflection and perhaps also regret.

Having One’s Cake

This new year (2015 into ’16) was a little different, though.  Following a very busy but also very rewarding year, the period over Christmas gave me opportunity for reflection and redirection.

2015 was a “solid” year.  And by that, I basically mean unrelenting.  It was a year without a single week off for annual leave, which proved extremely tiring as the autumn months came around.  At the same time, after a gruelling late summer with web projects “galore”, things started a gentle easing towards the end of the year.

It wasn’t to last, but amidst the business of work projects was also a number of social engagements which provided plenty of entertainment and some light relief!  All of which was enjoyed on social media, of course (want to connect? Find me on whatever you use).

Always room for a little freshly-made cake, right?

Three Directions

Naturally, life eventually returns to matters of work, which I love.  This year, my focus is on quality and quantity.  Well, if you can have both, why not!

Quality First

My belief is always that there is no substitute for quality [1].  I apply this principle to all the work my company, Warp Universal, is commissioned for by clients, and to all hosting services too.  I’m currently working on some ideas to further guarantee the highest quality project management and delivery to clients, whatever the challenges!

Support Always

Providing quality support is paramount in my eyes.  I have always been proud to offer good support to our customers, but this hasn’t been without its challenges (being forced to quickly reconsider data storage, in the wake of Schrems vs Facebook, being the most recent).

Building Up Organically

Managing a micro business is no mean feat, as anyone who has done so will testify.  At one time, I considered growth to be the largest (and perhaps only) signifier of a successful business.  But this is false, and I’m glad I realise that now.  Many struggling businesses are those that have grown too quickly, without enough consideration, or without the ability to back-off sales satisfactorily.  It’s my intention to grow the business, organically, sustainably and vertically.

2016 is looking to be a very promising year for Warp Universal

Pushing Forward

Alongside work, 2016 is looking to be a great year for my surfing.  Not because the weather patterns look particularly convivial to it, nor that my free time is that much greater than it was before.  It’s simply that I want to surf more in 2016, and I’m in a position to make it happen.

Along with that, it’s definitely a year to align my media production with media consumption.  A great love of mine is music, and work commitments have often meant I’ve lost touch with newer acts on the scene.  I look forward to reconnecting via a music subscription service.

Take Off!

The year ahead is an interesting prospect.  365 days remaining from today (leap year, remember!) to achieve so many goals.  And not forget that life is short, so a little fun should be had also.

 

[1] A phrase once used by my Grandmother.

The post Rebooting into a New Year appeared first on life at warp.

Categories: LUG Community Blogs

Chris Lamb: Free software activities in December 2015

Planet ALUG - Thu, 31/12/2015 - 11:05

Here is my monthly update covering a large part of what I have been doing in the free software world (previously):

Debian

My work in the Reproducible Builds project was also covered in more depth in Lunar's weekly reports (#31, #32, #33, #34).

LTS

This month I have been paid to work 12 hours on Debian Long Term Support (LTS). In that time I did the following:

  • Issued DLA 363-1 for libphp-phpmailer fixing a header injection vulnerability.
  • Issued DLA 365-1 for foomatic-filters correcting a shell injection vulnerability.
  • Issued DLA 369-1 for pygments fixing an issue shell injection vulnerability.
  • Issued DLA 374-1 for cacti to fix an SQL injection vulnerability.
  • Did some futher investigation of CVE-2011-5325 in busybox.
Uploads
  • python-django (1.9) — New upstream release.
  • redis (3.0.6) — New upstream stable release. I additionally backported this package to Debian stable.
  • redis (3.2~rc1) — Uploaded upstream's "testing/next" branch to experimental for testing.
  • gunicorn (19.4.1) — New upstream release.
FTP Team

As a Debian FTP assistant I ACCEPTed 45 packages: apt-show-source, dompurify.js, groonga, haskell-cryptol, initramfs-tools, iprange, jailer, jquery-slugify.js, jquery-ui-touch-punch.js, koji, lazy-object-proxy, libanyevent-termkey-perl, libjs-favico.js, liblwp-useragent-chicaching-perl, librdf-ns-curated-perl, libterm-termkey-perl, libvpx, lua-ansicolors, lwn4chrome, mimeo, node-isstream, onionbalance, osrm, profitbricks-sdk-python, pygeoif, pypi2deb, python-getdns, python-inflect, python-keyutils, python-nmea2, python-pika, qtip2.js, ruby-clockwork, ruby-innertube, ruby-joiner, ruby-middleware, ruby-pundit, ruby-rails-assets-jquery-nicescroll, ruby-rails-tokeninput, sqlacodegen, tails-installer, taskd, typeahead.js, udiskie & webcamoid and REJECTed 4.

Bugs filed Patches contributed

I also filed FTBFS bugs against acpid, android-platform-frameworks-base, antlr3, artemis, beignet, bisonc++, bobcat, bustle, cargo, checkbox-ng, code2html, cplay, datanommer.commands, dcmtkpp, debci, diffutils, diod, django-restricted-resource, docker-libkv, doomsday, dvdauthor, dwww, elasticsearch, elki, flask-script, freeipa, fso-frameworkd, funny-manpages, ggcov, ghc-mod, gmpc-plugins, gparted, gs-collections, guacamole-server, guncat, haskell-concrete-typerep, haskell-geniplate, haskell-nats, haskell-x509-util, hawtbuf, heimdal, htsjdk, inspircd, jboss-xnio, jenkins-winstone, jpeginfo, jruby-openssl, kaffeine, kdbg, ktp-accounts-kcm, kuser, libcommons-cli-java, libcommons-openpgp-java, libconfig-model-lcdproc-perl, libdata-faker-perl, libexplain, libgettext-commons-java, libgtk2-ex-printdialog-perl, libmoops-perl, libnet-frame-perl, libsendmail-milter-perl, libupnp, libuv, libvpx, liwc, m4, maven2, meep-mpich2, nagios-plugin-check-multi, natlog, netpipe, ocserv, ogre-1.8, orthanc-dicomweb, perspectives-extension, php-mail, php-pinba, phpseclib, pkg-haskell-tools, plastimatch, plexus-compiler, plexus-compiler-1.0, python-acme, python-crontab, python-cs, python-csscompressor, python-debian, python-distutils-extra, python-django-compressor, python-django-openstack-auth, python-django-tagging, python-pygit2, python-pyramid, python-pywcs, python-releases, python-shade, python-statsd, python-tasklib, python-tasklib, python-webm, python-websockets, regina-normal, rinetd, roboptim-core, rpm2html, rpm2html, ruby-factory-girl, ruby-fogbugz, ruby-i18n-inflector, ruby-loofah, ruby-protected-attributes, ruby-rack-contrib, ruby-rufus-scheduler, ruby-sanitize, ruby-sidetiq, ruby-sinatra, scsh-0.6, shogun, sleekxmpp, slugimage, spatial4j, sqwebmail-de, trac-announcer, ttt, txaws, umbrello, wine-gecko-2.21, xboxdrv, xfonts-wqy, xserver-xorg-video-openchrome, yorick & yoshimi.

Categories: LUG Community Blogs

Chris Lamb: Free software activities in December 2015

Planet ALUG - Thu, 31/12/2015 - 11:05

Here is my monthly update covering a large part of what I have been doing in the free software world (previously):

Debian

My work in the Reproducible Builds project was also covered in more depth in Lunar's weekly reports (#31, #32, #33, #34).

LTS

This month I have been paid to work 12 hours on Debian Long Term Support (LTS). In that time I did the following:

  • Issued DLA 363-1 for libphp-phpmailer fixing a header injection vulnerability.
  • Issued DLA 365-1 for foomatic-filters correcting a shell injection vulnerability.
  • Issued DLA 369-1 for pygments fixing an issue shell injection vulnerability.
  • Issued DLA 374-1 for cacti to fix an SQL injection vulnerability.
  • Did some futher investigation of CVE-2011-5325 in busybox.
Uploads
  • python-django (1.9) — New upstream release.
  • redis (3.0.6) — New upstream stable release. I additionally backported this package to Debian stable.
  • redis (3.2~rc1) — Uploaded upstream's "testing/next" branch to experimental for testing.
  • gunicorn (19.4.1) — New upstream release.
FTP Team

As a Debian FTP assistant I ACCEPTed 45 packages: apt-show-source, dompurify.js, groonga, haskell-cryptol, initramfs-tools, iprange, jailer, jquery-slugify.js, jquery-ui-touch-punch.js, koji, lazy-object-proxy, libanyevent-termkey-perl, libjs-favico.js, liblwp-useragent-chicaching-perl, librdf-ns-curated-perl, libterm-termkey-perl, libvpx, lua-ansicolors, lwn4chrome, mimeo, node-isstream, onionbalance, osrm, profitbricks-sdk-python, pygeoif, pypi2deb, python-getdns, python-inflect, python-keyutils, python-nmea2, python-pika, qtip2.js, ruby-clockwork, ruby-innertube, ruby-joiner, ruby-middleware, ruby-pundit, ruby-rails-assets-jquery-nicescroll, ruby-rails-tokeninput, sqlacodegen, tails-installer, taskd, typeahead.js, udiskie & webcamoid and REJECTed 4.

Bugs filed Patches contributed

I also filed FTBFS bugs against acpid, android-platform-frameworks-base, antlr3, artemis, beignet, bisonc++, bobcat, bustle, cargo, checkbox-ng, code2html, cplay, datanommer.commands, dcmtkpp, debci, diffutils, diod, django-restricted-resource, docker-libkv, doomsday, dvdauthor, dwww, elasticsearch, elki, flask-script, freeipa, fso-frameworkd, funny-manpages, ggcov, ghc-mod, gmpc-plugins, gparted, gs-collections, guacamole-server, guncat, haskell-concrete-typerep, haskell-geniplate, haskell-nats, haskell-x509-util, hawtbuf, heimdal, htsjdk, inspircd, jboss-xnio, jenkins-winstone, jpeginfo, jruby-openssl, kaffeine, kdbg, ktp-accounts-kcm, kuser, libcommons-cli-java, libcommons-openpgp-java, libconfig-model-lcdproc-perl, libdata-faker-perl, libexplain, libgettext-commons-java, libgtk2-ex-printdialog-perl, libmoops-perl, libnet-frame-perl, libsendmail-milter-perl, libupnp, libuv, libvpx, liwc, m4, maven2, meep-mpich2, nagios-plugin-check-multi, natlog, netpipe, ocserv, ogre-1.8, orthanc-dicomweb, perspectives-extension, php-mail, php-pinba, phpseclib, pkg-haskell-tools, plastimatch, plexus-compiler, plexus-compiler-1.0, python-acme, python-crontab, python-cs, python-csscompressor, python-debian, python-distutils-extra, python-django-compressor, python-django-openstack-auth, python-django-tagging, python-pygit2, python-pyramid, python-pywcs, python-releases, python-shade, python-statsd, python-tasklib, python-tasklib, python-webm, python-websockets, regina-normal, rinetd, roboptim-core, rpm2html, rpm2html, ruby-factory-girl, ruby-fogbugz, ruby-i18n-inflector, ruby-loofah, ruby-protected-attributes, ruby-rack-contrib, ruby-rufus-scheduler, ruby-sanitize, ruby-sidetiq, ruby-sinatra, scsh-0.6, shogun, sleekxmpp, slugimage, spatial4j, sqwebmail-de, trac-announcer, ttt, txaws, umbrello, wine-gecko-2.21, xboxdrv, xfonts-wqy, xserver-xorg-video-openchrome, yorick & yoshimi.

Categories: LUG Community Blogs

Ubuntu Empathy Microsoft Skype For Business Lync 2013 Client

Planet SurreyLUG - Thu, 31/12/2015 - 10:23

I wrote recently regarding using Microsoft Skype for Business / Lync 2013 in Pidgin, this has worked really well for our Lubuntu 14.04 clients, running Pidgin. Having some time off work I decided to try and get this working also on my Ubuntu 14.04 laptop.

The problem is that Ubuntu uses Empathy by default, rather than Pidgin, but I found that the steps were virtually identical (cut and pasted from my earlier post):

Download and Dependencies
  1. Install build tools if you don't already have them:

    sudo apt-get install build-essential

  2. Install checkinstall if you don't already have it:

    sudo apt-get install checkinstall

  3. Download source files.

  4. Extract source:

    tar -xvvzf pidgin-sipe-1.20.1.tar.gz

  5. Change into source directory:

    cd pidgin-sipe-1.20.1

  6. Read carefully the README file in the source directory.

  7. Install dependencies listed in the README:

    # apt-get install libpurple-dev libtool intltool pkg-config libglib2.0-dev libxml2-dev libnss3-dev libssl-dev libkrb5-dev libnice-dev libgstreamer0.10-dev

These dependencies may change over time, and your particular requirements may be different from mine, so please read the README and that information should take precedence.

Compile and Install

Lastly, as an ordinary user, you should now be able to compile. If it fails at any stage, simply read the error and install the missed dependency.

$ ./configure --prefix=/usr $ make $ sudo checkinstall

I found checkinstall was pre-populated with sensible settings, and I was able to continue without making any changes. Once complete a Debian package will have been created in the current directory, but it will have already been installed for you.

Add Account in Empathy

Still in a terminal type:

$ empathy-accounts

Then simply click the + button to add an account, select the Account Type "sipe", enter your email address in the Account field and click Log-in. Then highlight the newly created account and Edit Connection Preferences, opening up the Advanced section. I completed the following:

  • Login: enter your Skype for Business email address
  • Password
  • Server: leave blank
  • Transport: auto
  • User agent: UCCAPI/15.0.4420.1017 OC/15.0.4420.1017
  • Authentication: auto

And that really was all that there was to it.

Categories: LUG Community Blogs

Debian Bits: Debian mourns the passing of Ian Murdock

Planet HantsLUG - Wed, 30/12/2015 - 19:15

With a heavy heart Debian mourns the passing of Ian Murdock, stalwart proponent of Free Open Source Software, Father, Son, and the 'ian' in Debian.

Ian started the Debian project in August of 1993, releasing the first versions of Debian later that same year. Debian would go on to become the world's Universal Operating System, running on everything from embedded devices to the space station.

Ian's sharp focus was on creating a Distribution and community culture that did the right thing, be it ethically, or technically. Releases went out when they were ready, and the project's staunch stance on Software Freedom are the gold standards in the Free and Open Source world.

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Categories: LUG Community Blogs

Steve Kemp: I joined the internet of things.

Planet HantsLUG - Wed, 30/12/2015 - 07:03

In my old flat I had a couple of simple radio-controlled switches, which allowed me to toggle power to a pair of standing lamps - one at each side of the bed. This was very lazy, but also really handy and I've always been curious about automation..

When it comes to automation there seems to be three main flavours:

X10

The original standard, with stuff produced by many vendors and good Linux support.

X10 supports two ways of sending/receiving commands - over the electrical wiring, and over RF.

Z-Wave

This is the newcomer, which despite that seems to be well-supported and extensible. It allows "measurements" to be sent/received in addition to the broadcast of events like "switch on", and "switch off".

Other systems - often lighting-centric

There are toy-things like the previously noted power-controlling things, there are also stand-alone devices from people like Philips with their philips hue system, but given how Philips recently crippled their devices to disable third-party bulbs I've no desire to use them.

One company caught my eye though, Osram make a smart lightbulb and mini-hub to work with it.

So I bought one of the osram lightify systems, consisting of a magic box and a pair of lightbulbs. The box connects to your wifi, and gets an IP address. The IP address is then used by the application on your mobile phone (i.e. the magic box does the magic, not the bulbs). The phone application can be used to trigger "on", "off", "dim", "brighter", and the various colour-changing commands, as you would expect.

You absolutely must use the phone-based application to do the setup, but after that the whole point was that I could automate things. I wanted to be able to setup my desktop computer to schedule events, and started hacking.

I've written a simple Perl module to let me discover bulbs, and turn them off and on. No doubt it'll be on CPAN in the near future, once I can pick a suitable name for it:

$ ol --bridge=192.168.10.136 --list hall MAC:8418260000d9c70c RGBW:255,255,255,255 STATE:On kitchen MAC:8418260000cb433b RGBW:255,255,255,255 STATE:On $ ol --bridge=192.168.10.136 --off=kitchen $ ol --bridge=192.168.10.136 --list hall MAC:8418260000d9c70c RGBW:255,255,255,255 STATE:On kitchen MAC:8418260000cb433b RGBW:255,255,255,255 STATE:Off

The only niggle was the fiddly pairing, and the lack of any decent documentation. The code I wrote was loosely based on the python project python-lightify written by Mikael Magnusson. Also worth noting that the bridge/magic-box only exposes a single port so you can find the device on your VLAN by nmapping for port 4000:

$ nmap -v 192.168.10.0/24 -p 4000

The device doesn't seem to allow any network setup at all - it only uses DHCP. So you might want to make sure it gets assigned a stable IP.

Anyway I'm going to bed. When I do so I'll turn the lights off with my mobile phone. Neat.

In the future I will look at more complex automation, and I think Z-wave is the way I'll go. Right now I'm in a rented flat so replacing wall-switches, etc, is something I can't do. But the systems I've looked at seem neat, and this current setup will keep me amused for several months!

Categories: LUG Community Blogs
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