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Debian Bits: Help empower the Debian Outreach Program for Women

Planet HantsLUG - Thu, 16/10/2014 - 17:30

Debian is thrilled to participate in the 9th round of the GNOME FOSS Outreach Program. While OPW is similar to Google Summer of Code it has a winter session in addition to a summer session and is open to non-students.

Back at DebConf 14 several of us decided to volunteer because we want to increase diversity in Debian. Shortly thereafter the DPL announced Debian's participation in OPW 2014.

We have reached out to several corporate sponsors and are thrilled that so far Intel has agreed to fund an intern slot (in addition to the slot offered by the DPL)! While that makes two funded slots we have a third sponsor that has offered a challenge match: for each dollar donated by an individual to Debian the sponsor will donate another dollar for Debian OPW.

This is where we need your help! If we can raise $3,125 by October 22 that means we can mentor a third intern ($6,250). Please spread the word and donate today if you can at: http://debian.ch/opw2014/

If you'd like to participate as intern, the application deadline is the same (October 22nd). You can find out more on the Debian Wiki.

Categories: LUG Community Blogs

Steve Engledow (stilvoid): Things

Planet ALUG - Thu, 16/10/2014 - 00:05
Ogg(camp|tober|sford)

OggCamp was fantastic. If I can remember all the talks I went to I'll do a brief write up. The event certainly left me with a few little ideas for things to write and do.

Down with dynamic things!

One small example is that I've rewritten the build script for this blog. No more scripted generation of the final HTML; I just wget -m the development server and that's everything built. Then it's all just served up as static content through nginx. Simples and I don't know why I didn't think of just snapshotting it like that before.

Click

I've reached a point in my career now where I find myself wanting to create and present slide decks. WTF?

I'm still writing code fairly regularly but there's so much other stuff I spend my time doing that I'm not even sure I can account for. It still feels important.

Clock

I think I'm going to buy a Pebble to wean myself off the phone-checking habit that I've developed over the years.

Relatedly, I wrote this post on my phone. It wasn't nearly as painful as I'd expected.

Categories: LUG Community Blogs

Meeting at "The Moon Under Water"

Wolverhampton LUG News - Mon, 13/10/2014 - 10:26
Event-Date: Wednesday, 15 October, 2014 - 19:30 to 23:00Body: 53-55 Lichfield St Wolverhampton West Midlands WV1 1EQ Eat, Drink and talk Linux
Categories: LUG Community Blogs

Adam Trickett: Picasa Web: Overton Community Orchard Day

Planet HantsLUG - Sun, 12/10/2014 - 15:58
Date: 12 Oct 2014
Number of Photos in Album: 2

View Album

Categories: LUG Community Blogs

Andy Smith: Currently not possible

Planet HantsLUG - Sun, 12/10/2014 - 10:18

On Thursday 9th, after weeks of low-level frustration at having to press “close” on every login, I sent a complaint to Barclays asking them to stop asking me on every single login to switch to paperless statements with a dialog box that has only two options:

This morning they replied:

Please be advised that it is currently not possible for us to remove the switch to paperless statements advert.

So, uh, I suppose if you’re a web developer who thinks that it’s acceptable to ask a question on every login and not supply any means for the user to say, “stop asking me this question”, there is still a job for you in the banking industry. No one there will at any point tell you that this is awful user experience. They will probably just tell you, “good job”, from their jacuzzi full of cash that they got from charging people £5.80 a month to have a bank account, of which £0.30 is for posting a bank statement.

Meanwhile, on another part of their site, I attempt to tell them to send me letters by email not post, but the web site does not allow me to because it thinks I do not have an email address set. Even though the same screen shows my set email address which has been set for years.

After light mocking on Twitter they asked me to try using a different browser, before completely misunderstanding what I was talking about, at which point I gave up.

Categories: LUG Community Blogs

Andy Smith: Diversity at OggCamp comment

Planet HantsLUG - Fri, 10/10/2014 - 21:57

There’s an interesting post about diversity at a tech conference. It is itself a response to a number of tweets by an attendee, so you should read both those things, and probably all of the other comments first.

I’ve now tried twice to add a comment to this article, but each time my comment disappears into the ether. Mark tells me that he is not seeing the comments, i.e. they are not being held for moderation, so I just assume some bit of tech somewhere is failing. Yes, I do get the captcha challenge thing and do complete it successfully. Blog comment systems are awful aren’t they?

So anyway, here’s the most recent version of the comment I tried to add:

I originally wrote this comment on the evening of the 6th, but the blog appears to have eaten it, and I no longer have a copy of it so I’ll have to try to re-type it from memory. Also since then I note a number of other comments which are highly opposed to what I wrote, so you’ll have to take my word for it that this is genuine comment and not an attempt to cause strife.

I do not believe that OggCamp specifically has a problem and I agree with much of what Mark has written, particularly that the unconference format is not in fact used to excuse lack of diversity (though it can be, and doubtless will be, by someone). I do believe that OggCamp has tried quite hard to be welcoming to all, and in many ways has succeeded. There seems to be a slightly larger percentage of female attendees at OggCamp compared to other tech conferences I have been to. I feel strongly that there is a larger percentage of female speakers at OggCamp.

I do however believe the widespread observation that tech conferences and tech in general do have a problem with attracting people who aren’t white males. I do believe that any group organising a conference are obligated to try to fix this, which means that the organisers of OggCamp are.

Stating that there is no such problem and that everyone is welcome is not going to fix it. Clearly there is a problem here, there’s people reporting that there’s a problem and they don’t think you’re doing all that you could do to be welcoming. There’s a word for telling people who say they’re subject to an unwelcoming environment that they in fact are wrong about how they feel, and I’d really like for this not to go there.

However I do not think that many of the things that Mark has proposed will actually make any difference, as well-intentioned as they are. To help improve matters I think that OggCamp should do some things that Mark (and many others in these comments, apparently) will not like.

I am in favour of positive reinforcement / affirmative action / speaker quotas / whatever you want to refer to it as, as part of a diversity statement. Like, aspirational. To be regarded as a sort of “could do better” if it wasn’t achieved. I believe it has shown to be effective.

My first suggestion is to have some sort of diversity goal, perhaps one like, “ideally at least one largest-stage slot per day will be taken by a person who is not a white male”. If we assume one largest stage, two slots each on morning and afternoon, that’s four per day so that’s aiming for 25% main stage representation of speakers who aren’t white males. I believe the gender split alone (before we consider race or other marginalised attributes) in the tech industry is something like 80/20 so this doesn’t sound outrageous.

My second suggestion—and I feel this is possibly more important than the first—is to get more diversity in the group of people selecting the invited speakers. I think a bunch of white males (like myself) sitting about pontificating about diversity isn’t very much better than not doing anything at all. Put those decisions into the hands of the demographic we are trying to encourage.

So, I suggest asking zenaynay to speak at the next OggCamp, and I suggest asking zenaynay if they know any other people who aren’t white males who would like to speak at a future OggCamp.

I do not think that merely marketing OggCamp in more places will fix much. People that aren’t white males tend to be put off from speaking at events like OggCamp and the only way to change their minds is to directly contact them. More diverse speakers will lead to more diverse attendees.

In the same vein, there’s the code of conduct issue. We tend to believe that we are all really nice guys doing the best we can; we would never offend or upset anyone, we would never exclude anyone. The thing is, people who aren’t like us have a very different experience of the world. So just saying that we’re not like that isn’t really enough. Codes of conduct for conferences are a good idea for this reason. Many people who are not white males will not attend a conference that doesn’t have one, because they feel like there is no commitment there and they’re not welcome (or in many cases, safe).

Ashe Dryden compiled a useful page of tips for increasing diversity at tech conferences. If there is genuine desire to do this then I think you have to come up with a great counter-argument as to why it isn’t worth trying the things that Ashe Dryden has said have worked for others. Codes of conduct and diversity goals are in there. As is personally inviting speakers.

“We don’t have time to run a full CFP process” seems like one of the stronger counter-arguments to all of this, to which I think there are two answers:

  1. Don’t bother then; nothing changes.
  2. Try to find volunteers to do it for you; something may change.

Shanley Kane wrote a great collection of essays called Your Startup is Broken. Of course this is about startups (and a US-centric slant, too) not conferences, but it is a great read nontheless and touches upon all the sorts of issues that are relevant here. I really recommend it. It’s only $10.

Finally, I feel that many of the commentors are being a little too defensive. Try to take it as an indictment of the tech sector, not an indictment of OggCamp, and try to use it as feedback to improve things.

Categories: LUG Community Blogs

Wayne Stallwood (DrJeep): Hosting Update2

Planet ALUG - Thu, 09/10/2014 - 21:31
Well after a year the SD card on the Raspberry Pi has failed, I noticed /var was unhappy when I tried to apply the recent Bash updates. Attempts at repair only made things worse and I suspect there is some physical issue. I had minimised writes with logs in tmpfs and the frequently updated weather site sat in tmpfs too..logging to remote systems etc. So not quite sure what happened. Of course this is all very inconvenient when your kit lives in another country, so at some point I guess I will have to build a new SD card and ship it out...for now we are back on Amazon EC2...yay for the elastic cloud \o/
Categories: LUG Community Blogs

Chris Lamb: London—Paris—London 2014

Planet ALUG - Thu, 09/10/2014 - 17:19

I've wanted to ride to Paris for a few months now but was put off by the hassle of taking a bicycle on the Eurostar, as well having a somewhat philosophical and aesthetic objection to taking a bike on a train in the first place. After all, if one already is possession of a mode of transport...

My itinerary was straightforward:

Friday 12h00
London → Newhaven
Friday 23h00
Newhaven → Dieppe (ferry)
Saturday 04h00
Dieppe → Paris
Saturday 23h00
(Sleep)
Sunday 07h00
Paris → Dieppe
Sunday 18h00
Dieppe → Newhaven (ferry)
Sunday 21h00
Newhaven → Peacehaven
Sunday 23h00
(Sleep)
Monday 07h00
Peacehaven → London
Packing list
  • Ferry ticket (unnecessary in the end)
  • Passport
  • Credit card
  • USB A male → mini A male (charges phone, battery pack & front light)
  • USB A male → mini B male (for charging or connecting to Edge 800)
  • USB mini A male → OTG A female (for Edge 800 uploads via phone)
  • Waterproof pocket
  • Sleeping mask for ferry (probably unnecessary)
  • Battery pack

Not pictured:

  • Castelli Gabba Windstopper short-sleeve jersey
  • Castelli Velocissimo bib shorts
  • Castelli Nanoflex arm warmers
  • Castelli Squadra rain jacket
  • Garmin Edge 800
  • Phone
  • Front light: Lezyne Macro Drive
  • Rear lights: Knog Gekko (on bike), Knog Frog (on helmet)
  • Inner tubes (X2), Lezyne multitool, tire levers, hand pump

Day 1: London → Newhaven

Tower Bridge.

Many attempt to go from Tower Bridge → Eiffel Tower (or Marble Arch → Arc de Triomphe) in less than 24 hours. This would have been quite easy if I had left a couple of hours later.

Fanny's Farm Shop, Merstham, Surrey.

Plumpton, East Sussex.

West Pier, Newhaven.

Leaving Newhaven on the 23h00 ferry.


Day 2: Dieppe → Paris

Beauvoir-en-Lyons, Haute-Normandie.

Sérifontaine, Picardie.

La tour Eiffel, Paris.

Champ de Mars, Paris.

Pont de Grenelle, Paris.


Day 3: Paris → Dieppe

Cormeilles-en-Vexin, Île-de-France.

Gisors, Haute-Normandie.

Paris-Brest, Gisors, Haute-Normandie.

Wikipedia: This pastry was created in 1910 to commemorate the Paris–Brest bicycle race begun in 1891. Its circular shape is representative of a wheel. It became popular with riders on the Paris–Brest cycle race, partly because of its energizing high caloric value, and is now found in pâtisseries all over France.

Gournay-en-Bray, Haute-Normandie.

Début de l'Avenue Verte, Forges-les-Eaux, Haute-Normandie.

Mesnières-en-Bray, Haute-Normandie.

Dieppe, Haute-Normandie.

«La Mancha».


Day 4: Peacehaven → London

Peacehaven, East Sussex.

Highbrook, West Sussex.

London weather.


Summary
Distance
588.17 km
Pedal turns
~105,795

My only non-obvious tips would be to buy a disposable blanket in the Newhaven Co-Op to help you sleep on the ferry. In addition, as the food on the ferry is good enough you only need to get to the terminal one hour before departure, avoiding time on your feet in unpicturesque Newhaven.

In terms of equipment, I would bring another light for the 4AM start on «L'Avenue Verte» if only as a backup and I would have checked I could arrive at my Parisian Airbnb earlier in the day - I had to hang around for five hours in the heat before I could have a shower, properly relax, etc.

I had been warned not to rely on being able to obtain enough water en route on Sunday but whilst most shops were indeed shut I saw a bustling tabac or boulangerie at least once every 20km so one would never be truly stuck.

Route-wise, the surburbs of London and Paris are both equally dismal and unmotivating and there is about 50km of rather uninspiring and exposed riding on the D915.

However, «L'Avenue Verte» is fantastic even in the pitch-black and the entire trip was worth it simply for the silent and beautiful Normandy sunrise. I will be back.

Categories: LUG Community Blogs

Steve Kemp: Writing your own e-books is useful

Planet HantsLUG - Wed, 08/10/2014 - 19:03

Before our recent trip to Poland I took the time to create my own e-book, containing the names/addresses of people to whom we wanted to send postcards.

Authoring ebooks is simple, and this was a useful use. (Ordinarily I'd have my contacts on my phone, but I deliberately left it at home ..)

I did mean to copy and paste some notes from wikipedia about transport, tourist destinations, etc, into a brief guide. But I forgot.

In other news the toy virtual machine I hacked together got a decent series of updates, allowing you to embed it and add your own custom opcode(s) easily. That was neat, and fell out naturely from the switch to using function-pointers for the opcode implementation.

Categories: LUG Community Blogs
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