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Steve Engledow (stilvoid): btw

Planet ALUG - Fri, 31/01/2014 - 10:30

I discovered my new favourite fact about my new favourite language recently. I suppose it should be obvious but I hadn't though about it in explicitly these terms.

Given:

char* myStringArray[] = {"Hello", "Goodbye", "Tomatoes"}; int index = 2;

then the following will print Tomatoes:

printf("%s\n", myStringArray[index]);

and so (this is the bit I hadn't fully realised) will this:

printf("%s\n", index[myStringArray]);

Good times :)

Categories: LUG Community Blogs

Jono Bacon: New Bad Voltage Episode and Competition

Planet WolvesLUG - Fri, 31/01/2014 - 07:11

Bad Voltage Season 1 Episode 8 ‘We Don’t Need Roads’ is available now.

In this show Jeremy Garcia, Stuart Langridge, Bryan Lunduke, and myself present an hour of talk about leafblowers, dust-resistant paper, fruitflies, and:

  • Back to the Future II, the 1989 film, predicted a raft of technology for 2015. With only a year to go, is anything they suggested even close to achieveable?
  • We speak to Matthew Garrett, notable Linux kernel hacker and commenter on security, UEFI, and hardware about the NSA in your firmware, why computers are more compelling than fruitflies, and his work at Nebula on providing trust to the cloud
  • Guns. As a followup to our previous discussion about 3d-printing of guns, we talk about the issue of whether guns are a good idea, the arguments for and against gun control, and how this differs internationally
  • The second half of our predictions for 2014: Bryan and Stuart give theirs

Go and listen or download the show now and share your feedback on the forum.

Today we also launched our first competition, the Bad Voltage Selfie Competition where you can win a free bundle of O’Reilly books if you are the winner or runner up. To find out more head over here and join in the fun!

Categories: LUG Community Blogs

Steve Engledow (stilvoid): Stuff what I done

Planet ALUG - Thu, 30/01/2014 - 22:18

The diet is still going fairly well apart from a lapse yesterday owing to work-sponsored lunchtime pizza for a workshop session with JG and an evening meal out for Dad's birthday.

Roasted broccoli is the best thing ever.

I finally switched over to using mutt for my primary mail client after pondering doing so for ages. With some pretty minimal setup, I've already got more featureful (and considerably less annoying) than any other client. I honestly (actually) don't understand why people are so put off by terminal applications.

Roasted carrots are the second best thing ever.

I've learned a lot about C. For reasons I don't fully understand, I've been reading about C and coding things in my spare time. It's definitely my new favourite language.

Lamb chops are a close third.

Categories: LUG Community Blogs

Alan Pope: January 2014 Core Apps Final Hack Day – Weather and Terminal

Planet HantsLUG - Thu, 30/01/2014 - 14:05

See also Hack Day One – Reminders and Music, Day Two – Calendar and RSS Reader, Day Three – File Manager and Calculator and Day Four – Clock and Doc Viewer.

The Final Day of the January 2014 Core Apps Hack Days brings focus to Weather and Terminal but as I keep saying we welcome contributions to any app on any day of the week!

In order to get started we’ve come up with some suggestions for new developers.

First off get your development environment setup as documented at http://developer.ubuntu.com/apps/create/get-the-sdk/ which you can do either natively on Ubuntu 13.10 or 14.04 or in a Virtual Machine if you prefer.
If you have a Nexus device, you could either replace the legacy OS with Ubuntu using either of these guides – https://wiki.ubuntu.com/Touch/Install or https://wiki.ubuntu.com/Touch/DualBootInstallation.

Next up take a look at some of these suggestions based on your area of interest and skill level.

We welcome translations for all our Core Apps. If that’s if interest you can find everything you need at https://translations.launchpad.net/ubuntu-weather-app and https://translations.launchpad.net/ubuntu-terminal-app.

If you find bugs in the apps you can look for existing bugs to confirm or fix at https://bugs.launchpad.net/ubuntu-weather-app/+bugs and https://bugs.launchpad.net/ubuntu-terminal-app/+bugs, or file new bugs at https://bugs.launchpad.net/ubuntu-weather-app/+filebug and https://bugs.launchpad.net/ubuntu-terminal-app/+filebug

You may find some bugs which have yet to be confirmed or triaged, we’d love your help there too.

You’ll find out-standing merge proposals on launchpad at https://code.launchpad.net/ubuntu-weather-app/+activereviews and https://code.launchpad.net/ubuntu-terminal-app/+activereviews.

If you’d like to take on a task then we have some work items in the blueprints which you can assign to yourself and get cracking on at https://blueprints.launchpad.net/ubuntu-phone-commons/+spec/coreapps-1404-weather-dev and https://blueprints.launchpad.net/ubuntu-phone-commons/+spec/coreapps-1404-terminal-dev

You can find out more about the Core Apps Hack Days at the links at the top, and you’ll find all of us hanging out on #ubuntu-app-devel on freenode.

Categories: LUG Community Blogs

Aq: Fantasy League Planet Ubuntu?

Planet WolvesLUG - Thu, 30/01/2014 - 11:15

Mike Hall proposes “UbBloPoMo”, an initiative to get everyone on Planet Ubuntu posting every day about something. While I think his heart’s in the right place, I’m not sure that that’s the right way to go, especially since his thing sounds like it’s named after a disease of the rectum or something. So in thinking about it I thought… why not throw a little bit of fun in there?

The idea (which I have not built, to be clear) is: Fantasy League Planet Ubuntu. You go to the website, sign in with Ubuntu One, and get presented with a list of all Planet Ubuntu participants and some free money 1. Each Planet Ubuntu participant has a price, based on how often and with what quality they post… and you have to spend your money to buy a team of ten. Then, every time one of your team posts to the Planet, you get some points, based on the quality and frequency of their posting. The winner is the one with the most points at the end of the month, or at the end of every month. If it takes off, maybe we can get Canonical to throw in a t-shirt for the monthly winner or a voucher or something.

Sounds like it’d be fun, to me

Now for the detail and anticipation of complaints:

it’s way too easy to game the metrics

Disagree. It’d need a little thought, but it’s not hard to conceive of the scoring algorithm for new posts. A post existing at all scores some points; being longer scores more; the points drop off with more subsequent posts on a given day. That’s enough to stop people turning Planet Ubuntu into a linkblog or Twitter while still encouraging posting. Remember, the underlying goal here is to have more people writing more things and thus having our community be more vibrant. Sure, there’s nothing in theory stopping someone writing a bot to just post huge lorem-ipsum posts, but firstly it’s hard to imagine that anyone who’s already a valued member of the Ubuntu community 2 stooping that low to win a game, and secondly they’re polluting their own blog by doing it, so it hurts them more than it hurts us!

There’s endless scope here for extra stuff, too; does a link from one post to another add extra score? Do pictures improve the score? Etc. Iterate forever.

gamification is bad

Well… I certainly agree that some people think so, although I personally do not. And this would need a little thinking about; obviously if you don’t wanna play you don’t have to, but there’s a risk of being hassled by people to post more because you’re on their team. I suspect that having a way for a poster to request that they cannot be picked for a team is the obvious way out, but we ought to be better at social pressure than that; don’t hassle people.

so how would you build it?

Two components: an RSS aggregator, and the website. Choose your favourite RSS aggregator (spycyroll? planetvenus? whichever). Then, hourly, scrape the list of feeds from Planet Ubuntu 3 and hit each feed. For new posts, give them a score with the scoring algorithm. Your RSS aggregator needs to keep around the post metadata, but can throw away the post content because it’s not actually producing any output. Then credit each relevant team owner with the score for this new post. (Note: do not fetch this stuff on the fly. You need the aggregator running in the background, which means a cron job or something similar, not something embedded into PHP in the page.)

The website is pretty trivial: Ubuntu One sign in, simple database with one table containing (username, score, reason, blogowner, posturl) rows which look like

username score reason blogowner posturl sil 5 Michael Hall posted ‘UbBloPoMo’ mhall119 http://mhall119.com/…problem/ sil 2 Birthday bonus null null

and a page displaying your score, the reasons you got it, and how you’re doing compared to everyone else. If this site had a million million users then you’d want to do a bunch of clever denormalisation and use a nosql database or whatever, but it’s not going to… so just one mysql table will be fine, and get someone’s total with SELECT SUM(SCORE) FROM TABLE WHERE USERNAME='sil'.

so if it’s that easy why haven’t you built it?

Two reasons. The first and least important is shortness of time; it’s probably only a day or two to build, but I don’t have a spare day or two this week. The second, and more important, is that if it’s a good idea then we want to encourage lots of people to get involved, which is about motivating the community, and there are people out there who are better at that than I am. Hint.

I think this would be rather fun. It’s also ongoing fun with no ongoing time investment; once it’s built, it runs itself and continues being fun

And if it works, one can imagine as a sequel Fantasy League Ubuntu Developer — one point for a merge, two for a bug filed…?

Notes:

  1. note: not actual money. Of course.
  2. they’re on the Planet, right? So they’ve already passed that hurdle
  3. it would be nice if the Planet exported its list of participant feeds in machine-readable form; it must already have that list, so pointing a URL at it would be useful. Note that you can’t just fetch Planet Ubuntu’s own RSS feed, because you can’t unambiguously tell from that feed who wrote each post, unless you use their name as a unique key which is not a great idea
Categories: LUG Community Blogs

Aq: Fantasy League Planet Ubuntu?

Planet WolvesLUG - Thu, 30/01/2014 - 11:15

Mike Hall proposes “UbBloPoMo”, an initiative to get everyone on Planet Ubuntu posting every day about something. While I think his heart’s in the right place, I’m not sure that that’s the right way to go, especially since his thing sounds like it’s named after a disease of the rectum or something. So in thinking about it I thought… why not throw a little bit of fun in there?

The idea (which I have not built, to be clear) is: Fantasy League Planet Ubuntu. You go to the website, sign in with Ubuntu One, and get presented with a list of all Planet Ubuntu participants and some free money1. Each Planet Ubuntu participant has a price, based on how often and with what quality they post… and you have to spend your money to buy a team of ten. Then, every time one of your team posts to the Planet, you get some points, based on the quality and frequency of their posting. The winner is the one with the most points at the end of the month, or at the end of every month. If it takes off, maybe we can get Canonical to throw in a t-shirt for the monthly winner or a voucher or something.

Sounds like it’d be fun, to me :-)

Now for the detail and anticipation of complaints:

it’s way too easy to game the metrics

Disagree. It’d need a little thought, but it’s not hard to conceive of the scoring algorithm for new posts. A post existing at all scores some points; being longer scores more; the points drop off with more subsequent posts on a given day. That’s enough to stop people turning Planet Ubuntu into a linkblog or Twitter while still encouraging posting. Remember, the underlying goal here is to have more people writing more things and thus having our community be more vibrant. Sure, there’s nothing in theory stopping someone writing a bot to just post huge lorem-ipsum posts, but firstly it’s hard to imagine that anyone who’s already a valued member of the Ubuntu community2 stooping that low to win a game, and secondly they’re polluting their own blog by doing it, so it hurts them more than it hurts us!

There’s endless scope here for extra stuff, too; does a link from one post to another add extra score? Do pictures improve the score? Etc. Iterate forever.

gamification is bad

Well… I certainly agree that some people think so, although I personally do not. And this would need a little thinking about; obviously if you don’t wanna play you don’t have to, but there’s a risk of being hassled by people to post more because you’re on their team. I suspect that having a way for a poster to request that they cannot be picked for a team is the obvious way out, but we ought to be better at social pressure than that; don’t hassle people.

so how would you build it?

Two components: an RSS aggregator, and the website. Choose your favourite RSS aggregator (spycyroll? planetvenus? whichever). Then, hourly, scrape the list of feeds from Planet Ubuntu3 and hit each feed. For new posts, give them a score with the scoring algorithm. Your RSS aggregator needs to keep around the post metadata, but can throw away the post content because it’s not actually producing any output. Then credit each relevant team owner with the score for this new post. (Note: do not fetch this stuff on the fly. You need the aggregator running in the background, which means a cron job or something similar, not something embedded into PHP in the page.)

The website is pretty trivial: Ubuntu One sign in, simple database with one table containing (username, score, reason, blogowner, posturl) rows which look like

username score reason blogowner posturl sil 5 Michael Hall posted ‘UbBloPoMo’ mhall119 http://mhall119.com/…problem/ sil 2 Birthday bonus null null

and a page displaying your score, the reasons you got it, and how you’re doing compared to everyone else. If this site had a million million users then you’d want to do a bunch of clever denormalisation and use a nosql database or whatever, but it’s not going to… so just one mysql table will be fine, and get someone’s total with SELECT SUM(SCORE) FROM TABLE WHERE USERNAME='sil'.

so if it’s that easy why haven’t you built it?

Two reasons. The first and least important is shortness of time; it’s probably only a day or two to build, but I don’t have a spare day or two this week. The second, and more important, is that if it’s a good idea then we want to encourage lots of people to get involved, which is about motivating the community, and there are people out there who are better at that than I am. Hint.

I think this would be rather fun. It’s also ongoing fun with no ongoing time investment; once it’s built, it runs itself and continues being fun :)

And if it works, one can imagine as a sequel Fantasy League Ubuntu Developer — one point for a merge, two for a bug filed…?

  1. note: not actual money. Of course.
  2. they’re on the Planet, right? So they’ve already passed that hurdle
  3. it would be nice if the Planet exported its list of participant feeds in machine-readable form; it must already have that list, so pointing a URL at it would be useful. Note that you can’t just fetch Planet Ubuntu’s own RSS feed, because you can’t unambiguously tell from that feed who wrote each post, unless you use their name as a unique key which is not a great idea
Categories: LUG Community Blogs

Peter Cannon: Lorem Ipsum

Planet WolvesLUG - Thu, 30/01/2014 - 10:26

John Lewis: “Lorem Ipsum may be more professional but it’s also way more poncey!”

Categories: LUG Community Blogs

Jono Bacon: Happy Birthday, Aq

Planet WolvesLUG - Thu, 30/01/2014 - 05:16

Today (well technically the 30th) Stuart ‘Aq’ Langridge enters yet another decrepit year on his prolonged marathon of bothering us all. Not long now and he will be fully fossilized. I am not sure what an angry ginger fossil looks like, but I am pretty sure it is hilarious.

I first met Aq in 1999 at the Linux User Group I formed in Wolverhampton. Since then we have been the best of friends. We have weathered changing companies, moving countries, setting up businesses, various relationships, trying to sell houses, and spent approximately a third of our lives trying to outfox each other in debates (of which many of you may have overheard on Bad Voltage, LugRadio, and Shot Of Jaq).

At every step of the way in my life Aq has been there. He has been a friend in the truest sense of the word; he has motivated me, inspired me, told me when I am being an idiot, and kept me focused on the most important things in life. When I moved to California I was really genuinely worried we would drift apart as friends, but I am delighted that we are as close as we have ever been.

As such, I for one am thankful that approximately 125 years ago he was born on this day.

Tonight I expect to read tweets as he celebrates, complaining about terrible music and the overly frothy head on his pint, while hypothesizing on yet another computer to buy that isn’t a Thinkpad. Oh, and liking ridiculous yellow sports cars. And thinking Fear Of The Dark is Iron Maiden’s best album. Irrespective, it is a worthy celebration.

Thanks, comrade, for everything.

Categories: LUG Community Blogs

Aq: But these posts go to eleven

Planet WolvesLUG - Thu, 30/01/2014 - 01:29

To add to what I said last year, this post is actually the eleventh 1 time I’ve celebrated my continued survival for another year. Yep, it’s January 30th, the anniversary of the last Beatles gig, Hitler’s investiture as Chancellor of Germany, the naming of San Francisco, the involuntary decapitation of Charles the First, and… me being born.

Choose for yourself which is the most auspicious.

Apparently the number of my years this year was sacred to the Norse; it shows up a lot in their mythology, and the Hardrada clan crest had this many ravens and arrows on it. Which is pretty cool. The Langridge crest only has six black rectangles on it, although I only know this from deeply suspect internet genealogy sites, all of whom seem to be working off the same deeply suspect database designed to sell PDFs to hopeful Americans. Still, the family motto is medio tutissimus ibis, which means “you will go most safely in a middle course”. Since the middle course is the main meal, rather than starter or dessert, I’m happy with that. I’ve safely consumed a large number of dinners; it’s nice to know that I’m endorsed in doing so in Latin.

This year’s number is also a pretty common gun calibre 2, which is ironic considering that today will also see the release of the next episode of Bad Voltage, a podcast containing more than your daily recommended dose of me, Jeremy Garcia, Jono Bacon, and Bryan Lunduke, and which in this episode has a discussion about guns and whether they are a good idea. As a full-time professional resident of England, I think this: they are not a good idea. My co-presenters disagree, wrongly.

Still, it’s been an interesting year, this one. Left Canonical, gone into business for myself as Kryogenix Consulting 3 and thus far been reasonably successful, and I’ve just bought a new computer and am waiting impatiently for it to be delivered, about ten days from now. I think that’s an adequate birthday present to myself, yes it is, especially since I also threw in a monstrous 29″ 2560×1440 monitor. Ho, yus! I shall have more resolution than five New Year’s parties.

One for the maths junkies: take the sum of the squares of the first three primes. That’s how old I am in years. 4

Things seem to be hotting up here in 2014. I might even be moving house soon (what?!?). It’s still a fun time to be alive. Happy birthday to me.

Notes:

  1. I did <em><a>…</a></em> there. Should the <em> be inside the <a>? I am never sure
  2. not Dirty Harry’s one, though. I am not that old. Yet.
  3. Retain my services! For consultancy and custom development on Ubuntu and the web and mobile web. See kryogenix.org
  4. remember: 1 is not prime. This is by definition, in order that the decomposition of a number into prime factors is unique. Otherwise the prime decomposition of, say, 21 might be 7×3 or 7×3×1 or 7×3×1×1 and imagine what that would do to the RSA algorithm, eh?
Categories: LUG Community Blogs

Aq: But these posts go to eleven

Planet WolvesLUG - Thu, 30/01/2014 - 01:29

To add to what I said last year, this post is actually the eleventh there. Should the be inside the ? I am never sure/ref[] year. Yep, it’s January 30th, the anniversary of the last Beatles gig, Hitler’s investiture as Chancellor of Germany, the naming of San Francisco, the involuntary decapitation of Charles the First, and… me being born."> there. Should the be inside the ? I am never sure/ref[] year. Yep, it’s January 30th, the anniversary of the last Beatles gig, Hitler’s investiture as Chancellor of Germany, the naming of San Francisco, the involuntary decapitation of Charles the First, and… me being born."> there. Should the be inside the ? I am never sure/ref[] year. Yep, it’s January 30th, the anniversary of the last Beatles gig, Hitler’s investiture as Chancellor of Germany, the naming of San Francisco, the involuntary decapitation of Charles the First, and… me being born."> there. Should the be inside the ? I am never sure/ref[] year. Yep, it’s January 30th, the anniversary of the last Beatles gig, Hitler’s investiture as Chancellor of Germany, the naming of San Francisco, the involuntary decapitation of Charles the First, and… me being born." href="#sf-but-these-posts-go-to-eleven-1" class="simple-footnote">1

Choose for yourself which is the most auspicious.

Apparently the number of my years this year was sacred to the Norse; it shows up a lot in their mythology, and the Hardrada clan crest had this many ravens and arrows on it. Which is pretty cool. The Langridge crest only has six black rectangles on it, although I only know this from deeply suspect internet genealogy sites, all of whom seem to be working off the same deeply suspect database designed to sell PDFs to hopeful Americans. Still, the family motto is medio tutissimus ibis, which means “you will go most safely in a middle course”. Since the middle course is the main meal, rather than starter or dessert, I’m happy with that. I’ve safely consumed a large number of dinners; it’s nice to know that I’m endorsed in doing so in Latin.

This year’s number is also a pretty common gun calibre2, which is ironic considering that today will also see the release of the next episode of Bad Voltage, a podcast containing more than your daily recommended dose of me, Jeremy Garcia, Jono Bacon, and Bryan Lunduke, and which in this episode has a discussion about guns and whether they are a good idea. As a full-time professional resident of England, I think this: they are not a good idea. My co-presenters disagree, wrongly.

Still, it’s been an interesting year, this one. Left Canonical, gone into business for myself as Kryogenix Consulting3 and thus far been reasonably successful, and I’ve just bought a new computer and am waiting impatiently for it to be delivered, about ten days from now. I think that’s an adequate birthday present to myself, yes it is, especially since I also threw in a monstrous 29” 2560x1440 monitor. Ho, yus! I shall have more resolution than five New Year’s parties.

One for the maths junkies: take the sum of the squares of the first three primes. That’s how old I am in years.4

Things seem to be hotting up here in 2014. I might even be moving house soon (what?!?). It’s still a fun time to be alive. Happy birthday to me.

  1. I did <em><a>…</a></em> there. Should the <em> be inside the <a>? I am never sure/ref[] year. Yep, it’s January 30th, the anniversary of the last Beatles gig, Hitler’s investiture as Chancellor of Germany, the naming of San Francisco, the involuntary decapitation of Charles the First, and… me being born.
  2. not Dirty Harry’s one, though. I am not that old. Yet.
  3. Retain my services! For consultancy and custom development on Ubuntu and the web and mobile web. See kryogenix.org
  4. remember: 1 is not prime. This is by definition, in order that the decomposition of a number into prime factors is unique. Otherwise the prime decomposition of, say, 21 might be 7×3 or 7×3×1 or 7×3×1×1 and imagine what that would do to the RSA algorithm, eh?
Categories: LUG Community Blogs

Peter Cannon: Linux equivalents to Windows

Planet WolvesLUG - Wed, 29/01/2014 - 16:56

Linux equivalents to Windows One of the biggest difficulties in migrating from Windows to Linux is the lack of knowledge about comparable software. This is a list of Linux equivalents / replacements.

Categories: LUG Community Blogs

Peter Cannon: Linux Incompatibility List

Planet WolvesLUG - Wed, 29/01/2014 - 16:55

Leenooks – Linux Incompatibility List A list of hardware that is Linux compatible.

Categories: LUG Community Blogs

Peter Cannon: Hot Scripts

Planet WolvesLUG - Wed, 29/01/2014 - 16:52

Hot Scripts Hot Scripts is a comprehensive Web directory of more than 41,000 web development and programming-related resources.

Categories: LUG Community Blogs

Peter Cannon: Computer Stupidities

Planet WolvesLUG - Wed, 29/01/2014 - 16:51

Computer Stupidities The following is a large collection of stories and anecdotes about clueless computer users.

Categories: LUG Community Blogs

Peter Cannon: Best Windows Software

Planet WolvesLUG - Wed, 29/01/2014 - 16:48

Best Windows Software is a simple list of the best ‘Free’ applications available for Windows.

Categories: LUG Community Blogs

Peter Cannon: Firefox TV

Planet WolvesLUG - Wed, 29/01/2014 - 16:25

“I see Firefox as a Media Presentation Company to be honest rather than just a browser developer.” EP67 Let me lick your custard. #tdtrs

Categories: LUG Community Blogs

Alan Pope: January 2014 Core Apps Hack Day Four – Clock and Doc Viewer

Planet HantsLUG - Wed, 29/01/2014 - 11:35

See also Hack Day One – Reminders and Music, Day Two – Calendar and RSS Reader and Hack Day Three – File Manager and Calculator.

Day Four of the January 2014 Core Apps Hack Days brings focus to Clock and Doc Viewer but as I keep saying we welcome contributions to any app on any day of the week!

The Doc Viewer app is currently not in the image, so no screenshots there.

In order to get started we’ve come up with some suggestions for new developers.

First off get your development environment setup as documented at http://developer.ubuntu.com/apps/create/get-the-sdk/ which you can do either natively on Ubuntu 13.10 or 14.04 or in a Virtual Machine if you prefer.
If you have a Nexus device, you could either replace the legacy OS with Ubuntu using either of these guides – https://wiki.ubuntu.com/Touch/Install or https://wiki.ubuntu.com/Touch/DualBootInstallation.

Next up take a look at some of these suggestions based on your area of interest and skill level.

We welcome translations for all our Core Apps. If that’s if interest you can find everything you need at https://translations.launchpad.net/ubuntu-clock-app and https://translations.launchpad.net/ubuntu-docviewer-app.

If you find bugs in the apps you can look for existing bugs to confirm or fix at https://bugs.launchpad.net/ubuntu-clock-app/+bugs and https://bugs.launchpad.net/ubuntu-docviewer-app/+bugs, or file new bugs at https://bugs.launchpad.net/ubuntu-clock-app/+filebug and https://bugs.launchpad.net/ubuntu-docviewer-app/+filebug

You may find some bugs which have yet to be confirmed or triaged, we’d love your help there too.

You’ll find out-standing merge proposals on launchpad at https://code.launchpad.net/ubuntu-clock-app/+activereviews and https://code.launchpad.net/ubuntu-docviewer-app/+activereviews.

If you’d like to take on a task then we have some work items in the blueprints which you can assign to yourself and get cracking on at https://blueprints.launchpad.net/ubuntu-phone-commons/+spec/coreapps-1404-clock-dev and https://blueprints.launchpad.net/ubuntu-phone-commons/+spec/coreapps-1404-docviewer-dev

You can find out more about the Core Apps Hack Days at the links at the top, and you’ll find all of us hanging out on #ubuntu-app-devel on freenode.

Categories: LUG Community Blogs
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