News aggregator

Mick Morgan: do not be ordinary

Planet ALUG - Fri, 08/05/2015 - 09:10

The early results of yesterday’s poll are depressing beyond belief. It looks almost certain that the Tory party will have sufficient seats to form the next government.

I don’t often make party political points here (though my political leanings may sometimes be obvious) but I was reminded today of Neil Kinnock’s heart rending speech in Bridgend, Glamorgan, on Tuesday 7 June 1983, two days before the election in which Margaret Thatcher was returned as Prime Minister.

Kinnock said:

“If Margaret Thatcher wins on Thursday, I warn you not to be ordinary. I warn you not to be young. I warn you not to fall ill. I warn you not to get old.”

Those words resonate even more today than they did 32 years ago. I fear for the old, the poor, the disposessed, the weak, the young, the sick and yes, indeed, the ordinary people of this country. David Cameron and his cronies both inside and outside Government will now return to the task of dismantling all that is good and admirable about our society. A society should be judged on the way it treats its weakest and less able members. Cameron’s Tories are, at heart, brutal and uncaring. That frightens me.

Categories: LUG Community Blogs

Steve Kemp: On de-duplicating uploaded file-content.

Planet HantsLUG - Thu, 07/05/2015 - 01:00

This evening I've been mostly playing with removing duplicate content. I've had this idea for the past few days about object-storage, and obviously in that context if you can handle duplicate content cleanly that's a big win.

The naive implementation of object-storage involves splitting uploaded files into chunks, storing them separately, and writing database-entries such that you can reassemble the appropriate chunks when the object is retrieved.

If you store chunks on-disk, by the hash of their contents, then things are nice and simple.

The end result is that you might upload the file /etc/passwd, split that into four-byte chunks, and then hash each chunk using SHA256.

This leaves you with some database-entries, and a bunch of files on-disk:

/tmp/hashed/ef267892ee080862c96a8d2d05de62f48e20f0875f27379e7d58c73ea4455bf1 /tmp/hashed/a378977155fb42bb006496321cbe31f74cbda803c3f6ca590f30e76d1afad921 .. /tmp/hashed/3805b0245bc8375be7125ae228eef711552ac082ffb9bf8756e2964a2393a9de

In my toy-code I wrote out the data in 4-byte chunks, which is grossly ineffeciant. But the value of using such small pieces is that there is liable to be a lot of collisions, and that means we save-space. It is a trade-off.

So the main thing I was experimenting with was the size of the chunks. If you make them too small you lose I/O due to the overhead of writing out so many small files, but you gain because collisions are common.

The rough testing I did involved using chunks of 16, 32, 128, 255, 512, 1024, 2048, and 4096 bytes. As sizes went up the overhead shrank, but also so did the collisions.

Unless you could handle the case of users uploading a lot of files like /bin/ls which are going to collide 100% of the time with prior uploads using larger chunks just didn't win as much as I thought they would.

I wrote a toy server using Sinatra & Ruby, which handles the splitting/hashing/and stored block-IDs in SQLite. It's not so novel given that it took only an hour or so to write.

The downside of my approach is also immediately apparent. All the data must live on a single machine - so that reassmbly works in the simple fashion. That's possible, even with lots of content if you use GlusterFS, or similar, but it's probably not a great approach in general. If you have large capacity storage avilable locally then this might would well enough for storing backups, etc, but .. yeah.

Categories: LUG Community Blogs

Daniel Silverstone (Kinnison): Kimchi Trial 1 - Part 1

Planet ALUG - Mon, 04/05/2015 - 16:16

I have spent today making my first ever batch of Kimchi. I have been documenting it in photos as I go, but thought I'd write up what I did so that if anyone else fancies having a go too, we can compare results.

For a start, this recipe is nowhere near "traditional" because I don't have access to certain ingredients such as glutinous rice flour. I'm sure if I searched in many of the asian supermarkets around the city centre I could find it, but I'm lazy so I didn't even try.

I am not writing this up as a traditional recipe because I'm kinda making it up as I go along, with hints from various sources including the great and wonderful Maangchi whose YouTube channel I follow. Observant readers or followers of Maangchi will recognise the recipe as being close to her Easy Kimchi recipe, however since I'm useless, it won't be exact. If this batch turns out okay then I'll write it up as a proper recipe for you to follow.

I started off with three Chinese Leaf cabbages which seemed to be about 1.5kg or so once I'd stripped the less nice outer leaves, cored and chopped them.

I then soaked and drained the cabbage in cold water...

...before sprinkling a total of one third of a cup of salt over the cabbage and mixing it to distribute the salt.

Then I returned to the cabbage every 30 minutes to re-mix it a total of three times. After the cabbage had been salted for perhaps 1h45m or so, I rinsed it out. Maangchi recommends washing the cabbage three times so that's what I did before setting it out to drain in a colander.

Maangchi then calls for the creation of a porridge made from sweet rice flour which it turns out is very glutinous. Since I lack the ability to get that flour easily I substituted cornflour which I hope will be okay and then continued as before. One cup of water, one third of a cup of cornflour was heated until it started to bubble and then one sixth of a cup of sugar was added. Stirred throughout, once it went translucent I turned the heat off and proceeded.

One half of a red onion, a good thumb (once peeled) of ginger, half a bulb of garlic and one third of a cup of fish sauce went into a mini-zizzer. I then diagonal-chopped about five spring onions, and one leek, before cutting a fair sized carrot into inch long pieces before halving and then thinly slicing it. Maangchi calls for julienned carrots but I am not that patient.

Into the cooled porridge I put two thirds of a cup of korean hot pepper flakes (I have the coarse, but a mix of coarse and fine would possibly be better), the zizzed onion/garlic/ginger/fish mix and the vegetables...

...before mixing that thoroughly with a spatula.

Next came the messy bit (I put latex gloves on, and thoroughly washed my gloved hands for this). Into my largest mixing bowl I put a handful of the drained cabbage into the bowl and a handful of the pepper mix. Thoroughly mixing this before adding another handful of cabbage and pepper mix I repeated until all the cabbage and hot pepper mixed vegetables are well combined. I really got your arms into it, squishing it around, separating the leek somewhat, etc.

As a final task, I scooped the kimchi into a clicklok type box, pressing it down firmly to try and remove all the air bubbles, before sealing it in for a jolly good fermenting effort. I will have to remove a little tonight for our dinner (beef strips marinated in onion, ginger and garlic, with kimchi on rice) but the rest will then sit to ferment for a bit. Expect a part-2 with the report from tonight's dinner and a part-3 with the results after fermentation.

As an aside, I got my hot pepper flakes from Sous Chef who, it turns out, also stock glutinous rice flour -- I may have to get some more from them in the future. (#notsponsored)

Categories: LUG Community Blogs

Steve Kemp: A weekend of migrations

Planet HantsLUG - Mon, 04/05/2015 - 01:00

This weekend has been all about migrations:

Host Migrations

I've migrated several more systems to the Jessie release of Debian GNU/Linux. No major surprises, and now I'm in a good state.

I have 18 hosts, and now 16 of them are running Jessie. One of them I won't touch for a while, and the other is a KVM-host which runs about 8 guests - so I won't upgraded that for a while (because I want to schedule the shutdown of the guests for the host-reboot).

Password Migrations

I've started migrating my passwords to pass, which is a simple shell wrapper around GPG. I generated a new password-managing key, and started migrating the passwords.

I dislike that account-names are stored in plaintext, but that seems known and unlikely to be fixed.

I've "solved" the problem by dividing all my accounts into "Those that I wish to disclose post-death" (i.e. "banking", "amazon", "facebook", etc, etc), and those that are "never to be shared". The former are migrating, the latter are not.

(Yeah I'm thinking about estates at the moment, near-death things have that effect!)

Categories: LUG Community Blogs

Steve Engledow (stilvoid): Corporalism?

Planet ALUG - Sun, 03/05/2015 - 22:29

I was playing shop the other day with my son as he'd recently been bought a new toy till with money and food and it was going fairly well until he got a little excited and started saying "I want more money". At this, I started telling him that he couldn't just get money for nothing and that he'd need to sell me something else from his shop. This made my wife uncomfortable and she asked me to stop as she didn't want him being indoctrinated with such capitalist ideas from so early an age.

So, what's the alternative? I'm certainly not convinced there's anything wrong with teaching my son the value of currency and trade but similarly, I sort of agree that I don't want him to grow up only aware of one way that the world can work.

Educate for what's practical in the world he's growing up in and risk indoctrination or play through other scenarios and risk him growing up not knowing how to deal with financial matters?

How would that even work? I'm not sure I know how to play socialist shop. Maybe my parents failed ;)

Categories: LUG Community Blogs

Adam Trickett: Bog Roll: Waist to height ratio

Planet HantsLUG - Sun, 03/05/2015 - 17:26

The waist to height and waist to hips ratios are apparently better future indicators of health issues than the media friendly BMI. They also have the advantage that the only thing you need is a tape measure - which is a lot cheaper than an accurate weight scale.

My weight continues to melt away but more importantly my waist has started to shrink. While my weight has come down at an even 750 g per week rate, until now my waist line hasn't changed much. This morning's weigh in showed the largest waist shrinkage so far. While I can now wear one size smaller trousers, I've still got a long way to go to get to a health ratio.

Categories: LUG Community Blogs

Steve Engledow (stilvoid): Why-fi?

Planet ALUG - Wed, 29/04/2015 - 21:30

I'm an arch linux user and I love it; there's no other distro for me. The things that arch gets criticism for are the exact same reasons I love it and they all more or less boil down to one thing: arch does not hold your hand.

It's been a while since an update in arch caused me any problems but it did today.

It seems there's an issue with the latest version of wpa_supplicant which renders it incompatible with the way wifi is setup at boot time. The problem was caught and resolved very quickly by package maintainers who simply rolled the wpa_supplicant package back. However, I was unlucky enough to have caught the intervening upgrade shortly before turning my laptop off. I came home this evening to find I had no wifi!

This wasn't a huge challenge but I haven't written a blog post for a while and someone might find this useful:

If your wifi doesn't start at boot...

And you're using a laptop with no ethernet port...

And you know an upgrade will solve your problem...

How do you get internet so you can upgrade?

Simples :)

  1. First, find the name of your wireless interface:

    iw dev

    Which will output something like:

    phy#0 Interface wlp2s0 ifindex 2 wdev 0x1 addr e8:b1:fc:6c:bf:b5 type managed channel 11 (2462 MHz), width: 20 MHz, center1: 2462 MHz

    Where wlp2s0 is the bit we're interested in.

  2. Now bring the interface up:

    ip link set wlp2s0 up
  3. Connect to the access point:

    iw dev wlp2s0 connect "AP name"
  4. Create a temporary configuration file for wpa_supplicant:

    wpa_passphrase "AP name" "password" > /tmp/wpa.config
  5. Run wpa_supplicant to authenticate with the access point:

    wpa_supplication -iwlp2s0 -c/tmp/wpa.config
  6. In another terminal (or you could have backgrounded the above), run dhcpcd to get an IP address from your router:

    dhcpcd wlp2s0
  7. Update and reboot or whatever :)

Categories: LUG Community Blogs

Meeting at "The Moon Under Water"

Wolverhampton LUG News - Mon, 27/04/2015 - 08:12
Event-Date: Wednesday, 29 April, 2015 - 19:30 to 23:00Body: 53-55 Lichfield St Wolverhampton West Midlands WV1 1EQ Eat, Drink and talk Linux
Categories: LUG Community Blogs

Steve Kemp: Validating puppet manifests via git hooks.

Planet HantsLUG - Mon, 27/04/2015 - 01:00

It looks like I'll be spending a lot of time working with puppet over the coming weeks.

I've setup some toy deployments on virtual machines, and have converted several of my own hosts to using it, rather than my own slaughter system.

When it comes to puppet some things are good, and some things are bad, as exected, and as any similar tool (even my own). At the moment I'm just aiming for consistency and making sure I can control all the systems - BSD, Debian GNU/Linux, Ubuntu, Microsoft Windows, etc.

Little changes are making me happy though - rather than using a local git pre-commit hook to validate puppet manifests I'm now doing that checking on the server-side via a git pre-receive hook.

Doing it on the server-side means that I can never forget to add the local hook and future-colleagues can similarly never make this mistake, and commit malformed puppetry.

It is almost a shame there isn't a decent collection of example git-hooks, for doing things like this puppet-validation. Maybe there is and I've missed it.

It only crossed my mind because I've had to write several of these recently - a hook to rebuild a static website when the repository has a new markdown file pushed to it, a hook to validate syntax when pushes are attempted, and another hook to deny updates if the C-code fails to compile.

Categories: LUG Community Blogs

Debian Bits: Debian 8.0 Jessie has been released!

Planet HantsLUG - Sun, 26/04/2015 - 02:15

There's a new sheriff in town. And her name is Jessie. We're happy to announce the release of Debian 8.0, codenamed Jessie.

Want to install it? Choose your favourite installation media among Blu-ray Discs, DVDs, CDs and USB sticks. Then read the installation manual. For cloud users Debian also offers pre-built OpenStack images ready to use.

Already a happy Debian user and you only want to upgrade? You are just an apt-get dist-upgrade away from Jessie! Find how, reading the installation guide and the release notes.

Do you want to celebrate the release? Share the banner from this blog in your blog or your website!

Categories: LUG Community Blogs

Adam Trickett: Bog Roll: My Body Mass Index

Planet HantsLUG - Mon, 20/04/2015 - 20:07

About a decade ago I decided to lose some weight. I've always been overweight for my height - or undertall for my weight. I managed to reduce my weight slowly over a number of months by removing snacks & junk, and basic portion control. Combined with more exercise I managed to shed a quite a few kilos.

My diet and exercise regime has largely remained constant, I don't each too much junk and have plenty of fresh fruit and vegetables in my diet and in summer bike quite a bit. However overtime more snacks sneaked in, and portions started to grow again. While I wasn't as heavy as I was a decade ago, I was definetly heavier than I should be.

While I'm still highly dubious of the Body Mass Index (BMI), it being based on flawed maths, I clearly need to target a much lower weight than the last time I reduce my mass. The BMI suggests about 75 kg for my height (1.7 m), and at the moment I'm 83.5 kg and falling by a target rate of about 100 g per day. If I stay on track that's about 26 weeks on my current diet before I tweak it to level off.

So far I've stuck a pretty even rate of about 111 g per day, and I've only had one period of food cravings, after a bike ride on an empty stomach - which was to be expected - and was satisfied with an some fruit and a drink of water.

I've also managed to drop a trouser size, going from 91.5 cm being tight, through being loose, to 86.5 cm being wearable if a little tight after a meal. According to the height to waist theory - which has better science behind it than the BMI - I should aim to wear 81.5 cm trousers and they should be loose.

Categories: LUG Community Blogs

Steve Kemp: skx-www upgraded to jessie

Planet HantsLUG - Sat, 18/04/2015 - 01:00

Today I upgraded my main web-host to the Jessie release of Debian GNU/Linux.

I performed the upgraded by changing wheezy to jessie in the sources.list file, then ran:

apt-get update apt-get dist-upgrade

For some reason this didn't upgrade my kernel, which remained the 3.2.x version. That failed to boot, due to some udev/systemd issues (lots of "waiting for job: udev /dev/vda", etc, etc). To fix this I logged into my KVM-host, chrooted into the disk image (which I mounted via the use of kpartx), and installed the 3.16.x kernel, before rebooting into that.

All my websites seemed to be OK, but I made some changes regardless. (This was mostly for "neatness", using Debian packages instead of gems, and installing the attic package rather than keeping the source-install I'd made to /opt/attic.)

The only surprise was the significant upgrade of the Net::DNS perl-module. Nothing that a few minutes work didn't fix.

Now that I've upgraded the SSL-issue I had with redirections is no longer present. So it was a worthwhile thing to do.

Categories: LUG Community Blogs

Meeting at "The Oddfellows"

Wolverhampton LUG News - Fri, 17/04/2015 - 08:04
Event-Date: Wednesday, 15 April, 2015 - 19:30 to 23:00Body: http://www.oddfellowshallpub.co.uk Compton Wolverhampton West Midlands WV6 8AA Eat, Drink and talk Linux
Categories: LUG Community Blogs

Steve Kemp: Subject - Verb Agreement

Planet HantsLUG - Tue, 14/04/2015 - 01:00

There's pretty much no way that I can describe the act of cutting a live, 240V mains-voltage, wire in half with a pair of scissors which doesn't make me look like an idiot.

Yet yesterday evening that is exactly what I did.

There were mitigating circumstances, but trying to explain them would make little sense unless you could see the scene.

In conclusion: I'm alive, although I almost wasn't.

My scissors? They have a hole in them.

Categories: LUG Community Blogs

London Linux/podcaster meet up – Thursday Feb 26th at the Mulberry Bush pub near Waterloo station from 6pm

Greater London LUG News - Wed, 11/02/2015 - 21:58
In celebration of Scott’s visit to the UK, we have decided to organise a meet up. Confirmed attendees so far are Scott Newlon (mintCast), me (mintCast/Linux Luddites), jesse (Linux Luddites) and Matthew Copperwaite (The Dick Turpin Road Show).

The plan is to have a relaxed and informal evening of drinks and conversation. We’ve reserved a booth with a table that should be perfect in a really nice pub on the South Bank, a few minutes from Waterloo Station. Everyone is welcome so please spread the word!

Directions to the Mulberry Bush:

Leave Waterloo via the original main entrance in order to head towards the South Bank. The main entrance is found by turning left after coming through any of the ticket barriers, and is at the far end of the concourse beyond platform 18, on the right next to the lost luggage. Head through the glass doors and down the stone steps, if you find yourself on a bridge you’ve gone the wrong way, come back and look on your left for the glass doors.

Once down the steps head to your left, cross some zebra crossings and generally follow what is likely to be the main crowd towards the traffic lights to cross York Road. The aim is to stroll along Sutton Walk, the pedestrian walkway under the blue lattice bridge, towards the South Bank. Once under the bridge continue straight towards the Royal Festival Hall and you will shortly reach a T-junction with Belvedere road before you actually get to the hall.

Turn right and walk along that road – this is the home straight, except it’s the longest section of the trip! I’m afraid this part isn’t much to look at, you’ll pass the National Theatre, IBM and ITV and just when you think you’ve gone wrong, the Mulberry Bush will appear on your right hand side.


To find the booth that we have reserved, walk to the end of the bar and look to your left.

Hopefully see you there!
Categories: LUG News

Meet Up Thursday 29th January 2015 Ye Olde Cock Tavern from 6.30pm: Pre-FOSDEM Drinks

Greater London LUG News - Thu, 15/01/2015 - 13:36
After a bit of a break and after much interested we've put together a drink/meet up. It is right before FOSDEM so hoping we can get a few people from out-of-town too who might be down to head off on the EuroStar. So do let others know if they're travelling this way.

Feel free to bring laptops and gadgets to show off or get help with, but mainly bring yourself to meet other people with similar interests to your own.

We have booked an area of the ground floor and you should be able to find us pretty easily but we will have a plushy tux just in case.

Ye Olde Cock Tavern
22 Fleet Street
London
EC4Y 1AA

29th Jan 2015
From 6.30pm
Categories: LUG News

David Goodwin: Automated twitter compilation up to 16 June 2014

Planet WolvesLUG - Mon, 16/06/2014 - 16:22

Arbitrary tweets made by TheGingerDog up to 16 June 2014

2014/06/15

  • RT Proud my 8yo girl failed this worksheet. Wish she had failed it even “worse.” #GenderBias
  • 2012/11/03

  • RT #PHP devs. Please satisfy my curiosity and let me know about the frameworks you’ve used recently. Ta. https://twtpoll.com/gw7zecvn991qaxj (plz RT) 2014/06/15
  • RT Best banner at the World Cup so far
  • 2014/06/14

  • RT RT if you believe in freedom & democracy. #Falklands #LiberationDay
  • 2014/06/14

  • RT WordFriday: crosspathy
  • Attempt to pass homeopathy off as credible by combining it with empirically valid medicine.

    https://www.facebook.com/WordFriday/posts/637531733001454

    2014/06/13
  • And back home. Zzzz. Bromsgrove 2014/06/12
  • And now. Time to catch a plane. #snackTime Cyprus 2014/06/11
  • Thankfully I don’t use tweetdeck. Cyprus 2014/06/11
  • RT “US invasion and occupation cost Washington close to a trillion dollars ” – www.theguardian.com/world/2014/jun/11/mosul-isis-gunmen-middle-east-states enough to address climate change… #iraq 2014/06/11
  • RT #Iraq army capitulates to Isis militants in four cities – www.theguardian.com/world/2014/jun/11/mosul-isis-gunmen-middle-east-states what a disaster…well done, Bush and Blair… 2014/06/11
  • RT Twitter worms are so 2011. 2014/06/11
  • RT Tweetdeck XSS flaw leaves users vulnerable to account hijacking bit.ly/1lcEUK8 2014/06/11
  • RT HOW MUCH PIZZA AND COKE DO I HAVE TO FEED YOU NERDS BEFORE YOU SHUT UP ABOUT 80 HOUR WEEKS 2014/03/26
  • RT If one searches for CityLink on Google right now, you get this rather marvellously off message cartoon.
  • 2014/06/10

  • This morning we saw some Roman ruins and a Byzantine castle (mosaics etc)
  • Cyprus 2014/06/10

  • Oh Jesus. It’s raining men ! Cyprus 2014/06/08
  • It’s fun to stay at the YMCA …. You can get yourself clean. You can have a good meal …. Cyprus 2014/06/08
  • Wedding time.
  • Cyprus 2014/06/08

  • RT
  • 2014/06/07

  • The sun lounger things have already been stolen.
  • Cyprus 2014/06/08

  • It is dark early here. #landed Cyprus 2014/06/07
  • Our trusty steed for the next few hours.
  • Solihull 2014/06/07

  • RT Did… Did MongoDB just kill itself because it couldn’t rotate its log file? It did! It fucking did! 2014/06/07
  • Trying to scan this qr code causes my phone to reboot. #nexus4 #android #bug
  • Solihull 2014/06/07

  • Great weather this morning.
  • We woke to continual thunder.

    I think it is time to leave the country.

    Solihull 2014/06/07

  • Airport grammar fall. #bhx
  • Solihull 2014/06/07

  • RT HTTP/1.1 just got a major update. – Evert Pot feedproxy.google.com/~r/bijsterespoor/~3/padm6aekKhA/http-11-updated 2014/06/07
  • RT I love cycling, but it does really piss me off when cyclists cruise through red lights with an arrogance & nonchalance that boils the blood! 2014/06/06
  • RT Burnout.io – Help build a resource for the IT community to combat burnout: buff.ly/S1nWmk 2014/06/06
  • It has arrived ! (@TheMikeBennett‘s awesome book).
  • Bromsgrove 2014/06/06

  • RT But for the sacrifice of many, we may not have been born free. Think of that today if nothing else. #DDay70 #DDay #LestWeForget East, United Kingdom 2014/06/06
  • RT At turned midnight 6/6/2014 my biggest worry is getting home tomorrow. 70 yrs ago many didn’t, I doubt my day will be as life changing #DDay East, United Kingdom 2014/06/06
  • Categories: LUG Community Blogs

    Jono Bacon: FirefoxOS and Developing Markets

    Planet WolvesLUG - Fri, 13/06/2014 - 00:40

    It seems Mozilla is targeting emerging markets and developing nations with $25 cell phones. This is tremendous news, and an admirable focus for Mozilla, but it is not without risk.

    Bringing simple, accessible technology to these markets can have a profound impact. As an example, in 2001, 134 million Nigerians shared 500,000 land-lines (as covered by Jack Ewing in Businessweek back in 2007). That year the government started encouraging wireless market competition and by 2007 Nigeria had 30 million cellular subscribers.

    This generated market competition and better products, but more importantly, we have seen time and time again that access to technology such as cell phones improves education, provides opportunities for people to start small businesses, and in many cases is a contributing factor for bringing people out of poverty.

    So, cell phones are having a profound impact in these nations, but the question is, will it work with FirefoxOS?

    I am not sure.

    In Mozilla’s defence, they have done an admirable job with FirefoxOS. They have built a powerful platform, based on open web technology, and they lined up a raft of carriers to launch with. They have a strong brand, an active and passionate community, and like so many other success stories, they already have a popular existing product (their browser) to get them into meetings and headlines.

    Success though is judged by many different factors, and having a raft of carriers and products on the market is not enough. If they ship in volume but get high return rates, it could kill them, as is common for many new product launches.

    What I don’t know is whether this volume/return-rate balance plays such a critical role in developing markets. I would imagine that return rates could be higher (such as someone who has never used a cell phone before taking it back because it is just too alien to them). On the other hand, I wonder if those consumers there are willing to put up with more quirks just to get access to the cell network and potentially the Internet.

    What seems clear to me is that success here has little to do with the elegance or design of FirefoxOS (or any other product for that matter). It is instead about delivering incredibly dependable hardware. In developing nations people have less access to energy (for charging devices) and have to work harder to obtain it, and have lower access to support resources for how to use new technology. As such, it really needs to just work. This factor, I imagine, is going to be more outside of Mozilla’s hands.

    So, in a nutshell, if the $25 phones fail to meet expectations, it may not be Mozilla’s fault. Likewise, if they are successful, it may not be to their credit.

    Categories: LUG Community Blogs

    Jono Bacon: Community Management Training at OSCON, LinuxCon North America, and LinuxCon Europe

    Planet WolvesLUG - Wed, 11/06/2014 - 18:55

    I am a firm believer in building strong and empowered communities. We are in an age of a community management renaissance in which we are defining repeatable best practice that can be applied many different types of communities, whether internal to companies, external to volunteers, or a mix of both.

    I have been working to further this growth in community management via my books, The Art of Community and Dealing With Disrespect, the Community Leadership Summit, the Community Leadership Forum, and delivering training to our next generation of community managers and leaders.

    Last year I ran my first community management training course, and it was very positively received. I am delighted to announce that I will be running an updated training course at three events over the coming months.

    OSCON

    On Sunday 20th July 2014 I will be presenting the course at the OSCON conference in Portland, Oregon. This is a tutorial, so you will need to purchase a tutorial ticket to attend. Attendance is limited, so be sure to get to the class early on the day to reserve a seat!

    Find Out More

    LinuxCon North America and Europe

    I am delighted to bring my training to the excellent LinuxCon events in both North America and Europe.

    Firstly, on Fri 22nd August 2014 I will be presenting the course at LinuxCon North America in Chicago, Illinois and then on Thurs Oct 16th 2014 I will deliver the training at LinuxCon Europe in Düsseldorf, Germany.

    Tickets are $300 for the day’s training. This is a steal; I usually charge $2500+/day when delivering the training as part of a consultancy arrangement. Thanks to the Linux Foundation for making this available at an affordable rate.

    Space is limited, so go and register ASAP:

    What Is Covered

    So what is in the training course?

    My goal with each training day is to discuss how to build and grow a community, including building collaborative workflows, defining a governance structure, planning, marketing, and evaluating effectiveness. The day is packed with Q&A, discussion, and I encourage my students to raise questions, challenge me, and explore ways of optimizing their communities. This is not a sit-down-and-listen-to-a-teacher-drone on kind of session; it is interactive and designed to spark discussion.

    The day is mapped out like this:

    • 9.00am – Welcome and introductions
    • 9.30am – The core mechanics of community
    • 10.00am – Planning your community
    • 10.30am – Building a strategic plan
    • 11.00am – Building collaborative workflow
    • 12.00pm – Governance: Part I
    • 12.30pm – Lunch
    • 1.30pm – Governance: Part II
    • 2.00pm – Marketing, advocacy, promotion, and social
    • 3.00pm – Measuring your community
    • 3.30pm – Tracking, measuring community management
    • 4.30pm – Burnout and conflict resolution
    • 5.00pm – Finish

    I will warn you; it is an exhausting day, but ultimately rewarding. It covers a lot of ground in a short period of time, and then you can follow with further discussion of these and other topics on our Community Leadership discussion forum.

    I hope to see you there!

    Categories: LUG Community Blogs

    Dick Turpin: Old Tom

    Planet WolvesLUG - Thu, 05/06/2014 - 12:58
    So most of you will have heard my complaints about the difficulty in simply being able to order fish and chips from the chip shop? Well it would seem there are many other opportunities out there to eat up your lunch hour when trying to buy something.

    A well known UK car accessory outlet.

    Me: "Hi there can I have a Tom Tom Start 25 UK & ROF @ £99.99 please?"
    Assistant: "Do you want the maps for life?"
    Me: "Oh Christ, here we go! No thank you."
    Assistant: "Do you want the European maps?"
    Me: [Sobbing gently] "Could I just have the Tom Tom I asked for please?"
    Assistant: "OK I'll go and fetch one."
    Categories: LUG Community Blogs
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