News aggregator

Meeting at "The Moon Under Water"

Wolverhampton LUG News - Mon, 24/11/2014 - 13:45
Event-Date: Wednesday, 26 November, 2014 - 19:30 to 23:00Body: 53-55 Lichfield St Wolverhampton West Midlands WV1 1EQ Eat, Drink and talk Linux
Categories: LUG Community Blogs

Steve Kemp: Lumail 2.x ?

Planet HantsLUG - Sat, 22/11/2014 - 21:39

I've continued to ponder the idea of reimplementing the console mail-client I wrote, lumail, using a more object-based codebase.

For one thing having loosely coupled code would allow testing things in isolation, which is clearly a good thing.

I've written some proof of concept code which will allow the following Lua to be evaluated:

-- Open the maildir. users = Maildir.new( "/home/skx/Maildir/.debian.user" ) -- Count the messages. print( "There are " .. users:count() .. " messages in the maildir " .. users:path() ) -- -- Now we want to get all the messages and output their paths. -- for k,v in ipairs( users:messages()) do -- -- Here we could do something like: -- -- if ( string.find( v:headers["subject"], "troll", 1, true ) ) then v:delete() end -- -- Instead play-nice and just show the path. print( k .. " -> " .. v:path() ) end

This is all a bit ugly, but I've butchered some code together that works, and tried to solicit feedback from lumail users.

I'd write more but I'm tired, and intending to drink whisky and have an early night. Today I mostly replaced pipes in my attic. (Is it "attic", or is it "loft"? I keep alternating!) Fingers crossed this will mean a dry kitchen in the morning.

Categories: LUG Community Blogs

Steve Kemp: An experiment in (re)building Debian

Planet HantsLUG - Thu, 20/11/2014 - 13:28

I've rebuilt many Debian packages over the years, largely to fix bugs which affected me, or to add features which didn't make the cut in various releases. For example I made a package of fabric available for Wheezy, since it wasn't in the release. (Happily in that case a wheezy-backport became available. Similar cases involved repackaging gtk-gnutella when the protocol changed and the official package in the lenny release no longer worked.)

I generally release a lot of my own software as Debian packages, although I'll admit I've started switching to publishing Perl-based projects on CPAN instead - from which they can be debianized via dh-make-perl.

One thing I've not done for many years is a mass-rebuild of Debian packages. I did that once upon a time when I was trying to push for the stack-smashing-protection inclusion all the way back in 2006.

Having had a few interesting emails this past week I decided to do the job for real. I picked a random server of mine, rsync.io, which stores backups, and decided to rebuild it using "my own" packages.

The host has about 300 packages installed upon it:

root@rsync ~ # dpkg --list | grep ^ii | wc -l 294

I got the source to every package, patched the changelog to bump the version, and rebuild every package from source. That took about three hours.

Every package has a "skx1" suffix now, and all the build-dependencies were also determined by magic and rebuilt:

root@rsync ~ # dpkg --list | grep ^ii | awk '{ print $2 " " $3}'| head -n 4 acpi 1.6-1skx1 acpi-support-base 0.140-5+deb7u3skx1 acpid 1:2.0.16-1+deb7u1skx1 adduser 3.113+nmu3skx1

The process was pretty quick once I started getting more and more of the packages built. The only shortcut was not explicitly updating the dependencies to rely upon my updages. For example bash has a Debian control file that contains:

Depends: base-files (>= 2.1.12), debianutils (>= 2.15)

That should have been updated to say:

Depends: base-files (>= 2.1.12skx1), debianutils (>= 2.15skx1)

However I didn't do that, because I suspect if I did want to do this decently, and I wanted to share the source-trees, and the generated packages, the way to go would not be messing about with Debian versions instead I'd create a new Debian release "alpha-apple", "beta-bananna", "crunchy-carrot", "dying-dragonfruit", "easy-elderberry", or similar.

In conclusion: Importing Debian packages into git, much like Ubuntu did with bzr, is a fun project, and it doesn't take much to mass-rebuild if you're not making huge changes. Whether it is worth doing is an entirely different question of course.

Categories: LUG Community Blogs

Scopes Contest Mid-way Roundup

Planet SurreyLUG - Wed, 19/11/2014 - 12:03

I recently blogged about my Ubuntu Scopes Contest Wishlist after we kicked off the Scopes Development Competition where Ubuntu Phone Scope developers can be in with a chance of winning cool devices and swag. See the above links for more details.

As a judge on that contest I’ve been keeping an eye out for interesting scopes that are under development for the competition. As we’re at the half way point in the contest I thought I’d mention a few. Of course me mentioning them here doesn’t mean they’re favourites or winners, I’m just raising awareness of the competition and hopefully helping to inspire more people to get involved.

Developers have until 3rd December to complete their entry to be in with a chance of winning a laptop, tablet and other cool stuff. We’ll accept new scopes in the Ubuntu Click Store at any time though

Robert Schroll is working on a GMail scope giving fast access to email.

Bogdan Cuza is developing a Mixcloud scope making it easy to search for cool songs and remixes.

Sam Segers has a Google Places scope making it easy to find local businesses.

Michael Weimann has been working on a Nearby Scope and has been blogging about his progress.

Dan has also been blogging about the Cinema Scope.

Finally Riccardo Padovani has been posting screenshots of his Duck Duck Go Scope which is already in the click store.

I’m sure there there are other scopes I’ve missed. Feel free to link to them in the comments. It’s incredibly exciting for me to see early adopter developers embracing our fast-moving platform to realise their ideas.

Good luck to everyone entering the contest.

Categories: LUG Community Blogs

Alan Pope: Scopes Contest Mid-way Roundup

Planet HantsLUG - Wed, 19/11/2014 - 12:03

I recently blogged about my Ubuntu Scopes Contest Wishlist after we kicked off the Scopes Development Competition where Ubuntu Phone Scope developers can be in with a chance of winning cool devices and swag. See the above links for more details.

As a judge on that contest I’ve been keeping an eye out for interesting scopes that are under development for the competition. As we’re at the half way point in the contest I thought I’d mention a few. Of course me mentioning them here doesn’t mean they’re favourites or winners, I’m just raising awareness of the competition and hopefully helping to inspire more people to get involved.

Developers have until 3rd December to complete their entry to be in with a chance of winning a laptop, tablet and other cool stuff. We’ll accept new scopes in the Ubuntu Click Store at any time though

Robert Schroll is working on a GMail scope giving fast access to email.

Bogdan Cuza is developing a Mixcloud scope making it easy to search for cool songs and remixes.

Sam Segers has a Google Places scope making it easy to find local businesses.

Michael Weimann has been working on a Nearby Scope and has been blogging about his progress.

Dan has also been blogging about the Cinema Scope.

Finally Riccardo Padovani has been posting screenshots of his Duck Duck Go Scope which is already in the click store.

I’m sure there there are other scopes I’ve missed. Feel free to link to them in the comments. It’s incredibly exciting for me to see early adopter developers embracing our fast-moving platform to realise their ideas.

Good luck to everyone entering the contest.

Categories: LUG Community Blogs

Andy Smith: Paranoid, Init

Planet HantsLUG - Tue, 18/11/2014 - 11:00

Having marvelled at the er… unique nature of MikeeUSA’s Systemd Blues: Took our thing (Wooo) blues homage to the perils of using systemd, I decided what the world actually needs is something from the metal genre.

So, here’s the lyrics to Paranoid, Init.

Default soon on Debian
This doesn’t help me with my mind
People think I’m insane
Because I am trolling all the time

All day long I fight Red Hat
And uphold UNIX philosophy
Think I’ll lose my mind
If I can’t use sysvinit on jessie

Can you help me
Terrorise pid 1?
Oh yeah!

Tried to show the committee
That things were wrong with this design
They can’t see Poettering’s plan in this
They must be blind

Some sick joke I could just cry
GNOME needs logind API
QR codes gave me a feel
Then binary logs just broke the deal

And so as you hear these words
Telling you now of my state
Can’t log off and enjoy life
I’ve another sock puppet to create

Categories: LUG Community Blogs

Chris Lamb: Calculating the number of pedal turns on a bike ride

Planet ALUG - Mon, 17/11/2014 - 09:34

If you have a cadence sensor on your bike such as the Garmin GSC-10, you can approximate the number of pedal turns you made on the bike ride using the following script (requires GPSBabel):

#!/bin/sh STYLE="$(mktemp)" cat >${STYLE} <<EOF FIELD_DELIMITER COMMA RECORD_DELIMITER NEWLINE OFIELD CADENCE,"","%d" EOF exec gpsbabel -i garmin_fit -f "${1}" -o xcsv,style=${STYLE} -F- | awk '{x += $1} END {print int(x / 60)}'

... then call with:

$ sh cadence.sh ~/path/to/2014-11-16-14-46-05.fit 24344

Unfortunately the Garmin .fit format doesn't store the actual number of pedal turns, only the average for each particular second. However, it should be reasonably accurate given that one keeps a reasonably steady cadence.

As a bonus, using a small amount of shell plumbing you can then sum an entire year's worth of riding like so:

$ for X in ~/path/to/2014-*.fit; do sh cadence.sh ${X}; done | awk '{x += $1} END { print x }' 749943
Categories: LUG Community Blogs

David Goodwin: Automated twitter compilation up to 16 June 2014

Planet WolvesLUG - Mon, 16/06/2014 - 15:22

Arbitrary tweets made by TheGingerDog up to 16 June 2014

2014/06/15

  • RT Proud my 8yo girl failed this worksheet. Wish she had failed it even “worse.” #GenderBias
  • 2012/11/03

  • RT #PHP devs. Please satisfy my curiosity and let me know about the frameworks you’ve used recently. Ta. https://twtpoll.com/gw7zecvn991qaxj (plz RT) 2014/06/15
  • RT Best banner at the World Cup so far
  • 2014/06/14

  • RT RT if you believe in freedom & democracy. #Falklands #LiberationDay
  • 2014/06/14

  • RT WordFriday: crosspathy
  • Attempt to pass homeopathy off as credible by combining it with empirically valid medicine.

    https://www.facebook.com/WordFriday/posts/637531733001454

    2014/06/13
  • And back home. Zzzz. Bromsgrove 2014/06/12
  • And now. Time to catch a plane. #snackTime Cyprus 2014/06/11
  • Thankfully I don’t use tweetdeck. Cyprus 2014/06/11
  • RT “US invasion and occupation cost Washington close to a trillion dollars ” – www.theguardian.com/world/2014/jun/11/mosul-isis-gunmen-middle-east-states enough to address climate change… #iraq 2014/06/11
  • RT #Iraq army capitulates to Isis militants in four cities – www.theguardian.com/world/2014/jun/11/mosul-isis-gunmen-middle-east-states what a disaster…well done, Bush and Blair… 2014/06/11
  • RT Twitter worms are so 2011. 2014/06/11
  • RT Tweetdeck XSS flaw leaves users vulnerable to account hijacking bit.ly/1lcEUK8 2014/06/11
  • RT HOW MUCH PIZZA AND COKE DO I HAVE TO FEED YOU NERDS BEFORE YOU SHUT UP ABOUT 80 HOUR WEEKS 2014/03/26
  • RT If one searches for CityLink on Google right now, you get this rather marvellously off message cartoon.
  • 2014/06/10

  • This morning we saw some Roman ruins and a Byzantine castle (mosaics etc)
  • Cyprus 2014/06/10

  • Oh Jesus. It’s raining men ! Cyprus 2014/06/08
  • It’s fun to stay at the YMCA …. You can get yourself clean. You can have a good meal …. Cyprus 2014/06/08
  • Wedding time.
  • Cyprus 2014/06/08

  • RT
  • 2014/06/07

  • The sun lounger things have already been stolen.
  • Cyprus 2014/06/08

  • It is dark early here. #landed Cyprus 2014/06/07
  • Our trusty steed for the next few hours.
  • Solihull 2014/06/07

  • RT Did… Did MongoDB just kill itself because it couldn’t rotate its log file? It did! It fucking did! 2014/06/07
  • Trying to scan this qr code causes my phone to reboot. #nexus4 #android #bug
  • Solihull 2014/06/07

  • Great weather this morning.
  • We woke to continual thunder.

    I think it is time to leave the country.

    Solihull 2014/06/07

  • Airport grammar fall. #bhx
  • Solihull 2014/06/07

  • RT HTTP/1.1 just got a major update. – Evert Pot feedproxy.google.com/~r/bijsterespoor/~3/padm6aekKhA/http-11-updated 2014/06/07
  • RT I love cycling, but it does really piss me off when cyclists cruise through red lights with an arrogance & nonchalance that boils the blood! 2014/06/06
  • RT Burnout.io – Help build a resource for the IT community to combat burnout: buff.ly/S1nWmk 2014/06/06
  • It has arrived ! (@TheMikeBennett‘s awesome book).
  • Bromsgrove 2014/06/06

  • RT But for the sacrifice of many, we may not have been born free. Think of that today if nothing else. #DDay70 #DDay #LestWeForget East, United Kingdom 2014/06/06
  • RT At turned midnight 6/6/2014 my biggest worry is getting home tomorrow. 70 yrs ago many didn’t, I doubt my day will be as life changing #DDay East, United Kingdom 2014/06/06
  • Categories: LUG Community Blogs

    Jono Bacon: FirefoxOS and Developing Markets

    Planet WolvesLUG - Thu, 12/06/2014 - 23:40

    It seems Mozilla is targeting emerging markets and developing nations with $25 cell phones. This is tremendous news, and an admirable focus for Mozilla, but it is not without risk.

    Bringing simple, accessible technology to these markets can have a profound impact. As an example, in 2001, 134 million Nigerians shared 500,000 land-lines (as covered by Jack Ewing in Businessweek back in 2007). That year the government started encouraging wireless market competition and by 2007 Nigeria had 30 million cellular subscribers.

    This generated market competition and better products, but more importantly, we have seen time and time again that access to technology such as cell phones improves education, provides opportunities for people to start small businesses, and in many cases is a contributing factor for bringing people out of poverty.

    So, cell phones are having a profound impact in these nations, but the question is, will it work with FirefoxOS?

    I am not sure.

    In Mozilla’s defence, they have done an admirable job with FirefoxOS. They have built a powerful platform, based on open web technology, and they lined up a raft of carriers to launch with. They have a strong brand, an active and passionate community, and like so many other success stories, they already have a popular existing product (their browser) to get them into meetings and headlines.

    Success though is judged by many different factors, and having a raft of carriers and products on the market is not enough. If they ship in volume but get high return rates, it could kill them, as is common for many new product launches.

    What I don’t know is whether this volume/return-rate balance plays such a critical role in developing markets. I would imagine that return rates could be higher (such as someone who has never used a cell phone before taking it back because it is just too alien to them). On the other hand, I wonder if those consumers there are willing to put up with more quirks just to get access to the cell network and potentially the Internet.

    What seems clear to me is that success here has little to do with the elegance or design of FirefoxOS (or any other product for that matter). It is instead about delivering incredibly dependable hardware. In developing nations people have less access to energy (for charging devices) and have to work harder to obtain it, and have lower access to support resources for how to use new technology. As such, it really needs to just work. This factor, I imagine, is going to be more outside of Mozilla’s hands.

    So, in a nutshell, if the $25 phones fail to meet expectations, it may not be Mozilla’s fault. Likewise, if they are successful, it may not be to their credit.

    Categories: LUG Community Blogs
    Syndicate content