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Meeting at "The Moon Under Water"

Wolverhampton LUG News - Mon, 15/09/2014 - 15:16
Event-Date: Wednesday, 17 September, 2014 - 19:30 to 23:00Body: 53-55 Lichfield St Wolverhampton West Midlands WV1 1EQ Eat, Drink and talk Linux
Categories: LUG Community Blogs

Steve Kemp: Storing and distributing secrets.

Planet HantsLUG - Fri, 12/09/2014 - 21:10

I run a number of hosts, and they are controlled via a server automation tool I wrote called slaughter [Documentation].

The policies I use to control my hosts are public and I don't want to make them private because they server as good examples.

Because the roles are public I don't want to embed passwords in them, which means I need something to hold secrets securely. In my case secrets are things like plaintext-passwords. I want those secrets to be secure and unavailable from untrusted hosts.

The simplest solution I could think of was an IP-address based ACL and a simple webserver. A client requests something like:

  • http://secret.example.com/user-passwords

That returns a JSON object, if the requesting host is permitted to read the data. Otherwise it returns a HTTP 403 error.

The layout is very simple:

|-- secrets | |-- 206.190.139.148 | | `-- auth.json | |-- 127.0.0.1 | | `-- example.json | `-- 80.68.84.109 | `-- chat.json

Each piece of data is beneath a directory/symlink which controls the read-only access. If the request comes in from the suitable IP it is granted, if not it is denied.

For example a failing case:

skx@desktop ~ $ curl http://sss.steve.org.uk/chat missing/permission denied

A working case :

root@chat ~ # curl http://sss.steve.org.uk/chat { "steve": "haha", "bot": "notreally" }

(The JSON suffix is added automatically.)

It is hardly rocket-science, but I couldn't find anything else packaged neatly for this - only things like auth/secstore and factotum. So I'll share if it is useful.

Simple Secret Sharing, or Steve's secret storage.

Categories: LUG Community Blogs

Jonathan McDowell: Back from DebConf 14

Planet ALUG - Fri, 12/09/2014 - 15:03

I previously forgot to mention that I was planning to attend DebConf14, having missed DebConf13. This year the conference was held in Portland, OR. This is a city I've been to many times before, and enjoy, but I hadn't spent any time wandering around its city centre as a pedestrian. I have to say I really prefer DebConfs that are held in middle of city. It always seems a bit of a shame to travel some distance to somewhere new and spend all the time there in a conference venue. Plus these days I have the added lure of going out and playing Ingress in a new location. DebConf14 didn't disappoint in these respects; the location was super easy to get to from the airport via public transportation, all of the evening social events were within reasonable walking distance (I'll tend to default to walking when possible) and the talk venue/accommodation were close to each other and various eating + drinking options. Throw in the fact at Portland managed to produce some excellent weather (modulo my Ingress session on the last Saturday morning, when rained on me) and it's impossible to fault the physicalities of DebConf this year.

This year the conference format was a bit different; previous years have had a week long DebConf before the week of the conference itself. This year went for a 9 day talk schedule (Saturday -> Sunday) with various gaps of hacking time interspersed. I've found it hard to justify a full two weeks away in the past, so this setup worked a lot better from my viewpoint. Also I rarely go to DebConf with a predetermined list of things to do; the stuff I work on naturally falls out of talks I attend and informal discussions I have. Having hack time throughout the conference helped me avoid feeling I was having to trade off hacking vs talks.

Naturally enough a lot of my involvement at DebConf was around OpenPGP. Gunnar and I spent a fair bit of time getting Daniel up to speed with the keyring-maint team (Gunnar more than I, I'll confess). We finally set a hard timeframe for freeing Debian of older 1024 bit keys. I was introduced to the Gnuk, which is a particularly interesting piece of open specification hardware with a completely Free software stack on top if it that implements the OpenPGP smartcard spec. Currently it's limited to 2K keys but it's hoped that 4K support can be added (and I ended up spending a couple of hours after the closing talk hacking on the source and seeing how much needs to change for 4K support, aided by the very patient Niibe). These are the sort of things that really benefit from the face time that DebConf offers to the Debian project. I've said it before, but I think it's worth saying again: Debian is a bit like a huge telecommuting organization and it's my opinion that any such organization should try and ensure its members actually spend some time together on a regular basis. It improves the ability to work remotely a hell of a lot if you can actually put a face to the entity you're emailing / IRCing and have some sort of idea where they're coming from because you've spent some time with them, whether that's in talks or over dinner or just casual hallway chats.

For once I also found myself considering alternative employment while at DebConf and it was incredibly useful to be able to have various conversations with both old friends and people who were there with an eye on recruitment. Thanks to all those whose ears I bent about the subject (and more on the outcome in a future post). Thank you also to the many people involved with the organization of DebConf; I've been on the periphery a few times over the years and it's given me a glimpse into the amount of hard work all of the volunteers (be they global team, local organizing team, video team or just random volunteers) put into making DebConf one of my must-attend yearly conferences. If you're at all involved in Debian and haven't attended I strongly urge you to do so - I'll see you all next year at DebConf15 in Heidelberg!

Categories: LUG Community Blogs

Steve Kemp: A small email utility and other updates.

Planet HantsLUG - Thu, 11/09/2014 - 11:28

Last night I was looking for an image I knew a model had mailed me a few months ago, as we were talking about rescheduling a shoot at the weekend. I couldn't find it, even with my awesome mail client and filing system.

With some free time I figured I could write a little utility to dump all attachments from email folders, and find it that way.

It did cross my mind that there is the simple mail-utility for dumping headers, etc, called formail, which is distributed alongside procmail, but it doesn't handle attachments ..

I was tempted to write a general purpose script to dump attachments, email header values, etc, etc but given the lack of time I merely solved my own problem.

I suspect there is room for a "mail utilities" package, similar to Joey's "moreutils" and my "sysadmin utils". However I note that there is a GNU Mailutils which does things differently than I'd expect - i.e. it contains a POP3 server.

Still if you want to dump attachments from emails, have GMIME installed, and want to filter by attachment-name, or MIME-type, you might look at my trivial attachment-dump program.

Related to that I spent some time last night updating my photography site, so the animals & pets section has updated images at least.

During the course of that I found a bug in my static-site generator, templer which stopped it from automatically populating image height/widths when called in a glob:

Title: Pets & Animals Images: file_glob( "*.jpg" ) --- This is the page body, it now has access to a variable called 'images' which is a HTML::Template loop-structure containing name/height/width/etc for each image in the current directory.

That should now be resolved, and life should once again be good.

Categories: LUG Community Blogs

Steve Kemp: kvm-hosting will be ceasing, soon.

Planet HantsLUG - Wed, 10/09/2014 - 17:27

Seven years ago I wanted to move on from the small virtual machine I had to a larger one. Looking at the the options available it seemed the best approach was to rent a big host, and divide it up into virtual machines myself.

Renting a machine with 8Gb of RAM and 500Gb of disk-space, then dividing that into eights would give a decent spec and assuming that I found enough users to pay for the other slots/shares it would be economically viable too.

After a few weeks I took the plunge, advertised here, and found users.

I had six users:

  • 1/8th for me.
  • 1/8th left empty/idle for the host machine.
  • 6/8th for other users.

There were some niggles, one user seemed to suffer from connectivity problems more than the others, but on the whole the experiment worked out well.

These days, thanks to BigV, Digital Ocean, and all the new-comers there is less need for this kind of thing so last December I announced that the service would cease - and gave all current users 1 year of free service to give them time to migrate away.

The service was due to terminate in December, but triggered by some upcoming downtime where our host would have been moved, in the back of a van, from Manchester to York, I've taken the decision to stop it early.

It was a fun experiment, it provided me with low cost hosting (subsidized by the other paying users), and provided some other people with hosting of their own that was setup nicely.

The only outstanding question is what to do with the domain-names? I could let them expire, I could try to sell them, or I could donate them to other people running hosting setups.

If anybody reading this has a use for kvm-hosting.org, kvm-hosting.net, or kvm-hosting.com, then do feel free to get in touch. No promises, obviously, but it'd be a shame for them to end up hosting adverts in a year or twos time..

Categories: LUG Community Blogs

Adam Trickett: Picasa Web: Summer Holiday 2014

Planet HantsLUG - Mon, 08/09/2014 - 08:00

Our summer holiday in Denmark

Location: Denmark
Date: 8 Sep 2014
Number of Photos in Album: 117

View Album

Categories: LUG Community Blogs

Jonathan McDowell: Breaking up with America

Planet ALUG - Sat, 06/09/2014 - 23:38

Back in January I changed jobs. This took me longer to decide to do than it should have. My US visa (an L-1B) was tied to the old job, and not transferable, so leaving the old job also meant leaving the US. That was hard to do; I'd had a mostly fun 3 and a half years in the SF Bay Area.

The new job had an office in Belfast, and HQ in the Bay Area. I went to work in Belfast, and got sent out to the US to meet coworkers and generally get up to speed. During that visit the company applied for an H-1B visa for me. This would have let me return to the US in October 2014 and start working in the US office; up until that point I'd have continued to work from Belfast. Unfortunately there were 172,500 applications for 85,000 available visas and mine was not selected for processing.

I'm disappointed by this. I've enjoyed my time in the US. I had a green card application in process, but after nearly 2 years it still hadn't completed the initial hurdle of the labor certification stage (a combination of a number of factors, human, organizational and governmental). However the effort of returning to live here seems too great for the benefits gained. I can work for a US company with a non-US office and return on an L-1B after a year. And once again have to leave should I grow out of the job, or the job change in some way that doesn't suit me, or the company hit problems and have to lay me off. Or I can try again for an H-1B next year, aiming for an October 2015 return, and hope that this time my application gets selected for processing.

Neither really appeals. Both involve putting things on hold in the hope longer terms pans out as I hope. And to be honest I'm bored of that. I've loved living in America, but I ended up spending at least 6 months longer in the job I left in January than I'd have done if I'd been freely able to change employer without having to change continent. So it seems the time has come to accept that America and I must part ways, sad as that is. Which is why I'm currently sitting in SFO waiting for a flight back to Belfast and for the first time in 5 years not having any idea when I might be back in the US.

Categories: LUG Community Blogs

Steve Engledow (stilvoid): Lessons learned

Planet ALUG - Fri, 05/09/2014 - 09:51
  • Apparently I am unable to summarise.

  • When going on holiday somewhere, research things we might do once there rather than rely on local knowledge.

  • I am mildly allergic to raw tomatoes and need to stop bloody eating them.

  • Fork out for the TomTom map wherever we go. My aged TomTom One is still far better than anything I've found on Android so far.

    • Google Maps does not do navigation in Turkey.

    • Not all road signs in Turkey are reliable. Some rely on local knowledge.

  • Whatever the heat, keep feet covered at night; the mosquitos love them. Ouch.

  • Lost luggage will only turn up after you've given up hope and have bought replacements for the important stuff.

  • Turkey has inherited several things from French immigrants of yore. Notably, quite a bit of vocabulary and their driving style.

Categories: LUG Community Blogs
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