LUG Community Blogs

Meeting at "The Moon Under Water"

Wolverhampton LUG News - Mon, 03/08/2015 - 08:38
Event-Date: Wednesday, 5 August, 2015 - 19:30 to 23:00Body: 53-55 Lichfield St Wolverhampton West Midlands WV1 1EQ Eat, Drink and talk Linux
Categories: LUG Community Blogs

Mick Morgan: get your porn here

Planet ALUG - Thu, 30/07/2015 - 16:20

Dear Dave is at it again. Sometimes I worry about our PM’s priorities. Not content with his earlier insistence that UK ISPs must introduce “family friendly (read “porn”) filters”, our man in No 10 now wants to “see age restrictions put into place or these (i.e. “porn”) websites will face being shut down”.

El Reg today runs a nice article about Dave’s latest delusion. That article begins:

Prime Minister David Cameron has declared himself “determined to introduce age verification mechanisms to restrict under 18s’ access to pornographic websites” and he is “prepared to legislate to do so if the industry fails to self-regulate.”

It continues in classic El Reg style:

The government will hold a consultation in the autumn, meaning it will be standing on the proverbial street corner and soliciting views on how to stop 17-year-olds running a web search for the phrase “tits”.

and further notes that Baroness Shields (who is apparently our “Minister for internet safety and security”) said:

“Whilst great progress has been made, we remain acutely aware of the risks and dangers that young people face online. This is why we are committed to taking action to protect children from harmful content. Companies delivering adult content in the UK must take steps to make sure these sites are behind age verification controls.”

To which two members of the El Reg commentariat respond:

I give it 5 minutes after the “blockade” is put in place before someone puts a blog post up explaining how to bypass said blockade.

and

Re: 5 minutes

“I give it 5 minutes after the “blockade” is put in place before someone puts a blog post up explaining how to bypass said blockade.”

I can do that now & don’t need a blog.

Q: Are you over 18?

A: Yes

Someone, somewhere, in Government must be able to explain to this bunch of idiots how the internet works. Short of actually pulling the plug on the entire net, any attempt to block access to porn is doomed to failure. China has a well documented and massive censorship mechanism in place (the Great Firewall) in order to control what its populace can watch or read or listen to. That mechanism fails to prevent determined access to censored material. If a Marxist State cannot effectively block free access to the ‘net, then Dear Dave has no chance.

Unless of course he knows that, wants to fail, and plans his own Great Firewall in “reluctant” response.

Categories: LUG Community Blogs

Steve Kemp: The differences in Finland start at home.

Planet HantsLUG - Thu, 30/07/2015 - 10:09

So we're in Finland, and the differences start out immediately.

We're renting a flat, in building ten, on a street. You'd think "10 Streetname" was a single building, but no. It is a pair of buildings: 10A, and 10B.

Both of the buildings have 12 flats in them, with 10A having 1-12, and 10B having 13-24.

There's a keypad at the main entrance, which I assumed was to let you press a button and talk to the people inside "Hello I'm the postmaster", but no. There is no intercom system, instead you type in a magic number and the door opens.

The magic number? Sounds like you want to keep that secret, since it lets people into the common-area? No. Everybody has it. The postman, the cleaners, the DHL delivery man, and all the ex-tenants. We invited somebody over recently and gave it out in advance so that they could knock on our flat-door.

Talking of cleaners: In the UK I lived in a flat and once a fortnight somebody would come and sweep the stair-well, since we didn't ever agree to do it ourselves. Here somebody turns up every day, be it to cut the grass, polish the hand-rail, clean the glass on the front-door, or mop the floors of the common area. Sounds awesome. But they cut the grass, right outside our window, at 7:30AM. On the dot. (Or use a leaf-blower, or something equally noisy.)

All this communal-care is paid for by the building-association, of which all flat-owners own shares. Sounds like something we see in England, or even like Americas idea of a Home-Owners-Association. (In Scotland you own your own flat, you don't own shares of an entity which owns the complete building. I guess there are pros and cons to both approaches.)

Moving onwards other things are often the same, but the differences when you spot them are odd. I'm struggling to think of them right now, somebody woke me up by cutting our grass for the second time this week (!)

Anyway I'm registered now with the Finnish government, and have a citizen-number, which will be useful, I've got an appointment booked to register with the police - which is something I had to do as a foreigner within the first three months - and today I've got an appointment with a local bank so that I can have a euro-bank-account.

Happily I did find a gym to join, the owner came over one Sunday to give me a tiny-tour, and then gave me a list of other gyms to try if his wasn't good enough - which was a nice touch - I joined a couple of days later, his gym is awesome.

(I'm getting paid in UK-pounds, to a UK-bank, so right now I'm getting local money by transferring to my wifes account here, but I want to do that to my own, and open a shared account for paying for rent, electricity, internet, water, & etc).

My flat back home is still not rented, because the nice property management company lost my keys. Yeah you can't make that up can you? With a bit of luck the second set of keys I mailed them will arrive soon and the damn thing can be occupied, while I'm not relying on that income I do wish to have it.

Categories: LUG Community Blogs

Mick Morgan: domain privacy?

Planet ALUG - Tue, 28/07/2015 - 20:01

Over the past few months or so I have bought myself a bunch of new domain names (I collect ’em….). On some of those names I have chosen the option of “domain privacy” so that the whois record for the domain in question will show limited information to the world at large. I don’t often do this, for a couple of reasons. Firstly, I usually don’t much care whether or not the world at large knows that I own and manage a particular domain (I have over a dozen of these). Secondly, the privacy provided is largely illusory anyway. Law Enforcement Agencies, determined companies with pushy lawyers and network level adversaries will always be able to link any domain with the real owner should they so choose. In fact, faced with a simple DMCA request, some ISPs have in the past simply rolled over and exposed their customer’s details.

But, I get spam to all the email addresses I advertise in my whois records, and I also expose other personal details required by ICANN rules. I don’t much like that, but I put up with it as a necessary evil. However, for one or two of the new domains I don’t want the world and his dog attributing the name directly to me – at least not without some effort anyway.

Because the whois record must contain contact details, domain privacy systems tend to mask the genuine registrant email address with a proxy address of the form “some-random-alphanumeric-string@dummy.domain” which simply redirects to the genuine registrant email address. Here is one obvious flaw in the process because a network level adversary can simply post an email to the proxy address and then watch where it goes (so domain privacy is pointless if your adversary is GCHQ or NSA – but then if they are your adversaries you have a bigger problem than just maintaining privacy on your domain).

Interestingly, I have received multiple emails to each of the proxy addresses listed for my “private” domains purporting to come from marketing companies offering me the chance to sign up to various special offers. Each of those emails also offers me the chance to “unsubscribe” from their marketing list if I am not interested in their wares.

I’ll leave the task of spotting the obvious flaw in that as an exercise for the class.

Categories: LUG Community Blogs

Alan Pope: Easily port mobile HTML5 games to Ubuntu Phone

Planet HantsLUG - Tue, 28/07/2015 - 13:36

Article also available in Spanish at http://thinkonbytes.blogspot.co.uk/2015/07/migrar-facilmente-juegos-moviles-en.html thanks to Marcos Costales.

I really like playing games on my phone & tablet and wanted some more games to play on Ubuntu. With a little work it turns out it’s really pretty easy to ‘port’ games over to Ubuntu phone. I put the word ‘port’ in quotes simply because in some cases it’s not a tremendous amount of effort, so calling it a ‘port’ might make people think it’s more work than it is.

Update: A few people have asked why someone would want to even do this, and why not just bookmark a game in the browser. Sorry if that’s not clear. With this method the game is entirely cached offline on the customer phone. Having fully offline games is desirable in many situations including when travelling or in a location with spotty Internet access. Not all games are fully offline of course, this method wouldn’t help with a large on-line multi-player game like Clash of Clans for example. It would be great for many other titles though. This method also makes use of application confinement on Ubuntu so the app/game cannot access anything outside of the game data directory.

I worked with sturmflut from the Ubuntu Insiders on this over a few evenings and weekends. He wrote it up in his post Panda Madness.

We had some fun porting a few games and I wanted to share what we did so others can do the same. We created a simple template on github which can be used as a starting point, but I wanted to explain the process and the issues I had, so others can port apps/games.

If you have any questions feel free to leave me a comment, or if you’d rather talk privately you can get in contact in other ways.

Proof of concept

To prove that we could easily port existing games, we licensed a couple of games from Code Canyon. This is a marketplace where developers can license their games either for other developers to learn from, build upon or redistribute as-is. I started with a little game called Don’t Crash which is an HTML5 game written using Construct 2. I could have licensed other games, and other marketplaces are also available, but this seemed like a good low-cost way for me to test out this process.

Side note: Construct 2 by Scirra is a popular, powerful, point-and-click Windows-only tool for developing cross-platform HTML5 apps and games. It’s used by a lot of indie game developers to create games for desktop browsers and mobile devices alike. In development is Construct 3 which aims to be backwards compatible, and available on Linux too.

Before I licensed Don’t Crash I checked it worked satisfactorily on Ubuntu phone using the live preview feature on Code Canyon. I was happy it worked, so I paid and received a download containing the ‘source’ Construct 2 files.

If you’re a developer with your own game, then you can of course skip the above step, because you’ve already got the code to port.

Porting to Ubuntu

The absolute minimum needed to port a game is a few text files and the directory containing the game code. Sometimes a couple of tweaks are needed for things like permissions and lock rotation, but mostly it Just Works(TM).

I’m using an Ubuntu machine for all the packaging and testing, but in this instance I needed a Windows machine to export out the game runtime using Construct 2. Your requirements may vary, but for Ubuntu if you don’t have one, you could install it in a VM like VMWare or VirtualBox, then add the SDK tools as detailed at developer.ubuntu.com.

This is the entire contents of the directory, with the game itself in the www/ folder.

alan@deep-thought:~/phablet/code/popey/licensed/html5_dontcrash⟫ ls -l total 52 -rw-rw-r-- 1 alan alan 171 Jul 25 00:51 app.desktop -rw-rw-r-- 1 alan alan 167 Jun 9 17:19 app.json -rw-rw-r-- 1 alan alan 32826 May 19 19:01 icon.png -rw-rw-r-- 1 alan alan 366 Jul 25 00:51 manifest.json drwxrwxr-x 4 alan alan 4096 Jul 24 23:55 www Creating the metadata Manifest

This contains the basic details about your app like name, description, author, contact email and so on. Here’s mine (called manifest.json) from the latest version of Don’t Crash. Most of it should be fairly self-explanitory. You can simply replace each of the fields with your app details.

{ "description": "Don't Crash!", "framework": "ubuntu-sdk-14.10-html", "hooks": { "dontcrash": { "apparmor": "app.json", "desktop": "app.desktop" } }, "maintainer": "Alan Pope ", "name": "dontcrash.popey", "title": "Don't Crash!", "version": "0.22" }

Note: “popey” is my developer namespace in the store, you’ll need to specify your namespace which you configure in your account page on the developer portal.

Security profile

Named app.json, this details what permissions my app needs in order to run:-

{ "template": "ubuntu-webapp", "policy_groups": [ "networking", "audio", "video", "webview" ], "policy_version": 1.2 } Desktop file

This defines how the app is launched, what the icon filename is, and some other details:-

[Desktop Entry] Name=Don't Crash Comment=Avoid the other cars Exec=webapp-container $@ www/index.html Terminal=false Type=Application X-Ubuntu-Touch=true Icon=./icon.png

Again, change the Name and Comment fields, and you’re mostly done here.

Building a click package

With those files created, and an icon.png thrown in, I can now build my click package for uploading to the store. Here’s that process in its entirety:-

alan@deep-thought:~/phablet/code/popey/licensed⟫ click build html5_dontcrash/ Now executing: click-review ./dontcrash.popey_0.22_all.click ./dontcrash.popey_0.22_all.click: pass Successfully built package in './dontcrash.popey_0.22_all.click'.

Which on my laptop took about a second.

Note the “pass” is output from the click-review tool which sanity checks click packages immediately after building, to make sure there’s no errors likely to cause it to be rejected from the store.

Testing on an Ubuntu device

Testing the click package on a device is pretty easy. It’s just a case of copying the click package over from my Ubuntu machine via a USB cable using adb, then installing it.

adb push dontcrash.popey_0.22_all.click /tmp adb shell pkcon install-local --allow-untrusted /tmp/dontcrash.popey_0.22_all.click

Switch to the app scope and pull down to refresh, tap the icon and play the game.

Success!

Tweaking the app

At this point for some of the games I noticed some issues which I’ll highlight here in case others also have them:-

Local loading of files

Construct 2 moans that “Exported games won’t work until you upload them. (When running on the file:/// protocol, browsers block many features from working for security reasons.” in a javascript popup and the game doesn’t start. I just removed that chunk of js which does the check from the index.html and the game works fine in our browser.

Device orientation

With the most recent Over The Air (OTA) update of Ubuntu we enabled device orientation everywhere which means some games can rotate and become unplayable. We can lock games to be portrait or landscape in the desktop file (created above) by simply adding this line:-

X-Ubuntu-Supported-Orientations=portrait

Obviously changing “portrait” to “landscape” if your game is horizontally played. For Don’t Crash I didn’t do this because the developer had coded orientation detection in the game, and tells the player to rotate the device when it’s the wrong way round.

Twitter links

Some games we ported have Twitter links in the game so players can tweet their score. Unfortunately the mobile web version of Twitter doesn’t support intents so you can’t have a link which contains the content “Check out my score in Don’t Crash” embedded in it for example. So I just removed the Twitter links for now.

Cookies

Our browser doesn’t support locally served cookies. Some games use this. For Heroine Dusk I ported from cookies to Local Storage which worked fine.

Uploading to the store

Uploading click packages to the Ubuntu store is fast and easy. Simply visit myapps.developer.ubuntu.com/dev/click-apps/, sign up/in, click “New Application” and follow the upload steps.

That’s it! I look forward to seeing some more games in the store soon. Patches also welcome to the template on github.

Categories: LUG Community Blogs

Adam Trickett: Bog Roll: GCN/Hannah Grant Energy Bars

Planet HantsLUG - Sat, 25/07/2015 - 12:58

Today I tried to make some GCN/Hannah Grant energy bars. I fist had to convert from silly cups into sensible units*, and we were missing pumpkin seeds but we had everything else.

  • 4 ripe bananas - about 340 g. Blended to a fine mush
  • 200 g rolled oats
  • 100 g dried fruit - we used rains
  • 60 g linseed/flax seeds - our were golden
  • 60 g sunflower seeds - ours were kernels only
  • 60 g almonds - chopped
  • 60 g pecans - chopped, we also had some cashews in this mix
  • cinnamon - I substituted nutmeg as my better half doesn't like cinnamon
  • salt - skipped as I'm on a low salt diet

Mix together, spread in a baking tray - ours wasn't deep enough, it should be 2 - 3 cm thick and bake on 170°C for 20 to 25 minutes until golden brown. Allow to cool for 10 minutes before cutting into energy bar shaped pieces. Store in an airtight container in the fridge.

Before baking it looks a bit like a home made lard & seed cake for garden birds, which in may respects it is, albeit with a lot less fat and lot more expensive ingredients!

Mine is now cooling and we'll try this it afternoon!

How do you measure a cup full of banana? Weights are far easier to use.

Categories: LUG Community Blogs

Steve Kemp: We're in Finland now.

Planet HantsLUG - Sat, 25/07/2015 - 03:00

So we've recently spent our first week together in Helsinki, Finland.

Mostly this has been stress-free, but there are always oddities about living in new places, and moving to Europe didn't minimize them.

For the moment I'll gloss over the differences and instead document the computer problem I had. Our previous shared-desktop system had a pair of drives configured using software RAID. I pulled one of the drives to use in a smaller-cased system (smaller so it was easier to ship).

Only one drive of a pair being present make mdadm scream, via email, once per day, with reports of failure.

The output of cat /proc/mdstat looked like this:

md2 : active raid1 sdb6[0] [LVM-storage-area] 1903576896 blocks super 1.2 2 near-copies [2/1] [_U] md1 : active raid10 sdb5[1] [/root] 48794112 blocks super 1.2 2 near-copies [2/1] [_U] md0 : active raid1 sdb1[0] [/boot] 975296 blocks super 1.2 2 near-copies [2/1] [_U]

See the "_" there? That's the missing drive. I couldn't remove the drive as it wasn't present on-disk, so this failed:

mdadm --fail /dev/md0 /dev/sda1 mdadm --remove /dev/md0 /dev/sda1 # repeat for md1, md2.

Similarly removing all "detached" drives failed, so the only thing to do was to mess around re-creating the arrays with a single drive:

lvchange -a n shelob-vol mdadm --stop /dev/md2 mdadm --create /dev/md2 --level=1 --raid-devices=1 /dev/sdb6 --force ..

I did that on the LVM-storage area, and the /boot partition, but "/" is still to be updated. I'll use knoppix/similar to do it next week. That'll give me a "RAID" system which won't alert every day.

Thanks to the joys of re-creation the UUIDs of the devices changed, so /etc/mdadm/mdadm.conf needed updating. I realized that too late, when grub failed to show the menu, because it didn't find it's own UUID. Handy recipe for the future:

set prefix=(md/0)/grub/ insmod linux linux (md/0)/vmlinuz-3.16.0-0.bpo.4-amd64 root=/dev/md1 initrd (md/0)//boot/initrd.img-3.16.0-0.bpo.4-amd64 boot
Categories: LUG Community Blogs

Jonathan McDowell: Recovering a DGN3500 via JTAG

Planet ALUG - Tue, 21/07/2015 - 11:34

Back in 2010 when I needed an ADSL2 router in the US I bought a Netgear DGN3500. It did what I wanted out of the box and being based on a MIPS AR9 (ARX100) it seemed likely OpenWRT support might happen. Long story short I managed to overwrite u-boot (the bootloader) while flashing a test image I’d built. I ended up buying a new router (same model) to get my internet connection back ASAP and never getting around to fully fixing the broken one. Until yesterday. Below is how I fixed it; both for my own future reference and in case it’s of use any any other unfortunate soul.

The device has clear points for serial and JTAG and it was easy enough (even with my basic soldering skills) to put a proper header on. The tricky bit is that the flash is connected via SPI, so it’s not just a matter of attaching JTAG, doing a scan and reflashing from the JTAG tool. I ended up doing RAM initialisation, then copying a RAM copy of u-boot in and then using that to reflash. There may well have been a better way, but this worked for me. For reference the failure mode I saw was an infinitely repeating:

ROM VER: 1.1.3 CFG 05

My JTAG device is a Bus Pirate v3b which is much better than the parallel port JTAG device I built the first time I wanted to do something similar. I put the latest firmware (6.1) on it.

All of this was done from my laptop, which runs Debian testing (stretch). I used the OpenOCD 0.9.0-1+b1 package from there.

Daniel Schwierzeck has some OpenOCD scripts which include a target definition for the ARX100. I added a board definition for the DGN3500 (I’ve also send Daniel a patch to add this to his repo).

I tied all of this together with an openocd.cfg that contained:

source [find interface/buspirate.cfg] buspirate_port /dev/ttyUSB1 buspirate_vreg 0 buspirate_mode normal buspirate_pullup 0 reset_config trst_only source [find openocd-scripts/target/arx100.cfg] source [find openocd-scripts/board/dgn3500.cfg] gdb_flash_program enable gdb_memory_map enable gdb_breakpoint_override hard

I was then able to power on the router and type dgn3500_ramboot into the OpenOCD session. This fetched my RAM copy of u-boot from dgn3500_ram/u-boot.bin, copied it into the router’s memory and started it running. From there I had a u-boot environment with access to the flash commands and was able to restore the original Netgear image (and once I was sure that was working ok I subsequently upgraded to the Barrier Breaker OpenWRT image).

Categories: LUG Community Blogs

Andy Smith: systemd on Debian, reading the persistent system logs as a user

Planet HantsLUG - Mon, 20/07/2015 - 11:48

All the documentation and guides I found say that to enable a persistent journal on Debian you just need to create /var/log/journal. It is true that once you create that directory you will get a persistent journal.

All the documentation and guides I found say that as long as you are in group adm (or sometimes they say group systemd-journal) it is possible to see all system logs by just typing journalctl, without having to run it as root. Having simply done mkdir /var/log/journal I can tell you that is not the case. All you will see is logs relating to your user.

The missing piece of info is contained in /usr/share/doc/systemd/README.Debian:


Enabling persistent logging in journald
=======================================

To enable persistent logging, create /var/log/journal and set up proper permissions:

install -d -g systemd-journal /var/log/journal
setfacl -R -nm g:adm:rx,d:g:adm:rx /var/log/journal

-- Tollef Fog Heen , Wed, 12 Oct 2011 08:43:50 +0200

Without the above you will not have permission to read the /var/log/journal//system.journal file, and the ACL is necessary for journal files created in the future to also be readable.

Categories: LUG Community Blogs

Meeting at "The Moon Under Water"

Wolverhampton LUG News - Sun, 19/07/2015 - 21:48
Event-Date: Wednesday, 22 July, 2015 - 19:30 to 23:00Body: 53-55 Lichfield St Wolverhampton West Midlands WV1 1EQ Eat, Drink and talk Linux
Categories: LUG Community Blogs

Adam Trickett: Bog Roll: Hybrid Diet

Planet HantsLUG - Sun, 19/07/2015 - 21:06

I'm sticking to my calorie restricted diet. Once I get to the correct target weight or waist size I'll stick to the diet but increase the calories to match my burn rate so I stay put at the right size.

My diet is a combination of three highly regarded diets: the DASH; the portfolio and the Mediterranean diet. They are basically the same for over ~75% of their components and ideas, so they are easy to combine. All three are good for reducing blood pressure, reducing serum LDL and if used in a calorie restricted manner then good for reducing body mass.

The all share the following obvious components: lots of fresh fruit and vegetables every day (5 portions of each); high fibre un-refined cereals; plenty of nuts and pulses; low levels of fat & sugar and not much processed food.

The DASH diet keeps the salt levels low or ultra low. Lower than the national RDA and either aligned with the WHO upper limit in the basic version, or lower still in the ultra low salt version. Caffeine and alcohol are also moderated to lower than normal levels.

The portfolio diet adds more plant protein in the form of soya and other legumes. It also adds know "cholesterol" absorbing foods to the diet like beta-glucans from wholemeal oats, sterols from fortified dairy products and soya instead of some diary products.

Finally from the Mediterranean diet there is oily fish, e.g. mackerel and sardines instead of beef.

I'm now less than 75 kg, and starting to fit into medium sized men's clothing rather than large which is too lose and XL which fits like a tent. About 10 kg to go if you assume BMI, and about 1 trouser size if you accept waist:height ratio.

Categories: LUG Community Blogs

Debian Bits: Debian Perl Sprint 2015

Planet HantsLUG - Mon, 13/07/2015 - 20:00

The Debian Perl team had its first sprint in May and it was a success: 7 members met in Barcelona the weekend from May 22nd to May 24th to kick off the development around perl for Stretch and to work on QA tasks across the more than 3000 packages that the team maintains.

Even though the participants enjoyed the beautiful weather and the food very much, a good amount of work was also done:

  • 53 bugs were filed or worked on, 31 uploads were accepted.
  • The current practice of patch management (quilt) was discussed and possible alternatives were shown (git-debcherry and git-dpm).
  • Improvements were made in the Debian Perl Tools (dpt) and discussed how to get track of upstream git history and tags.
  • Team's policies, documentation and recurring tasks were reviewed and updated.
  • Perl 5.22 release was prepared and src:perl plans for Stretch were discussed.
  • autopkgtest whitelists were reviewed, new packages added, and IRC notificacions by KGB were discussed.
  • Outstanding migrations were reviewed.
  • Reproducibility issues with POD_MAN_DATE were commented.

The full report was posted to the relevant Debian mailing lists.

The participants would like to thank the Computer Architecture Department of the Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya for hosting us, and all donors to the Debian project who helped to cover a large part of our expenses.

Categories: LUG Community Blogs

Chris Lamb: Where's the principled opposition to the "WhatsApp ban"?

Planet ALUG - Fri, 10/07/2015 - 19:23

The Independent reports that David Cameron wishes to ban the instant messaging application WhatsApp due its use of end-to-end encryption.

That we might merely be pawns in manoeuvring for some future political compromise (or merely susceptible to cheap clickbait) should be cause for some concern, but what should worry us more is that if it takes scare stories about WhatsApp for our culture to awaken on the issues of privacy and civil liberties, then the central argument against surveillance was lost a long time ago.

However, the situation worsens once you analyse the disapproval in more detail. One is immediately struck by a predominant narrative of technical considerations; a ban would be "unworkable" or "impractical". A robust defence of personal liberty or a warning about the insidious nature of chilling effects? Perhaps a prescient John Locke quote to underscore the case? No. An encryption ban would "cause security problems."

The argument proceeds in a tediously predictable fashion: it was already difficult to keep track whether one should ipso facto be in favour of measures that benefit the economy, but we are suddenly co-opted as technocrats to consider the "damage" it could to do the recovery or the impact on a now-victimised financial sector. The «coup-de-grâce» finally appeals to our already inflated self-regard and narcissism: someone could "steal your identity."

Perhaps even more disappointing is the reaction from more technically-minded circles who, frankly, should know better. Here, they give the outward impression of metaphorically stockpiling copies of the GnuPG source code in their bunkers, perhaps believing the shallow techno-utopianist worldview that all social and cultural problems can probably be solved with Twitter and a JavaScript intepreter.

The tragedy here is that I suspect that this isn't what the vast majority of people really believe. Given a hypothetical ban that could, somehow, bypass all of the stated concerns, I'm pretty upbeat and confident that most people would remain uncomfortable with it on some level.

So what, exactly, does it take for us to oppose this kind of intervention on enduring principled grounds instead of transient and circumventable practical ones? Is the problem just a lack of vocabulary to discuss these issues on a social scale? A lack of courage?

Whilst it's certainly easier to dissect illiberal measures on technical merit than to make an impassioned case for abstract freedoms, every time we gleefully cackle "it won't work" we are, in essence, conceding the central argument to the authoritarian and the censorious. If one is right but for the wrong reasons, were we even right to begin with?

Categories: LUG Community Blogs

Meeting at "The Moon Under Water"

Wolverhampton LUG News - Mon, 06/07/2015 - 20:54
Event-Date: Wednesday, 8 July, 2015 - 19:30 to 23:00Body: 53-55 Lichfield St Wolverhampton West Midlands WV1 1EQ Eat, Drink and talk Linux
Categories: LUG Community Blogs

Surrey LUG Summer BBQ 11 July 2015

Surrey LUG - Sat, 04/07/2015 - 23:07
Start: 2015-07-11 00:01 End: 2015-07-11 00:01 BBQ

Yes, it's summer time, get ready for almost raw i/o, or slightly cooked!

Categories: LUG Community Blogs

Adam Trickett: Bog Roll: Body Mass

Planet HantsLUG - Thu, 02/07/2015 - 22:20

It's now been a few weeks since I've been on my new diet. Since April I've lost a further ~6 kg, currently weighing in at around 77 kg. Other than my trip to Guernsey which appear to have added 1 kg (all the raspberries and tomatoes...) instead of a 440 g loss, taking me about 1.5 kg off track. I've stopped using a weekly weigh-in, opting for a 7-day moving average which is less volatile and probably more meaningful.

My diet is basically what I had when I was too heavy but slightly tweaked:

  • Five servings of fruit per day
  • Five servings of vegetables per day
  • Five servings of nuts and/or beans per week
  • One serving of protein per day, lean or oily fish or vegetable based
  • Plenty of fibre, from the food rather than added as a supplement

I've had to exclude:

  • Salt - need to keep to the WHO limit, not the much higher UK limit
  • Caffeine - I don't drink coffee but I can only have very little or no tea, which I do like
  • Added sugars - no added sugars on/to anything
  • Added fat, especially saturated, trans-fats and Palm fat
  • Alcohol - it's got too much energy in it and there isn't space for it in the budget
  • No substitute foods, e.g. fat-free fat or synthetic sweeteners

The up shot is that with the limit on sugars, fats and salt most processed foods are now off limits, and will probably remain that way for ever. The occasion item is okay but it really has to be only occasionally.

The main addition to my diet are the nuts, I'm not really a fan of them, but they apparently are good for LDL/HDL ratio and blood pressure. I've also added some xylitol based mints as they are minty (I have a sweet tooth) and apparently there is good evidence that they contribute to reducing dental decay.

I've also swapped some of my yoghurt to yoghurt with plant sterols in or yoghurt based on soya rather than milk. Both are proven to reduce your LDL levels in the blood, which is probably a good idea - though possibly not enough to make a clinically significant outcome.

Categories: LUG Community Blogs

Steve Kemp: My new fitness challenge

Planet HantsLUG - Thu, 02/07/2015 - 09:18

So recently I posted on twitter about a sudden gain in strength:

I have conquered pull-ups! On Saturday night I could do 1.5. Today I could do 11! (Chinups were always easy.) #fitness

— Steve Kemp (@Stolen_Souls) June 15, 2015

To put that more into context I should give a few more details. In the past I've been using an assisted pull-up machine, which offers a counterweight to make such things easier.

When I started the exercise I assumed I couldn't do it for real, so I used the machine and set it on 150lb. Over a few weeks I got as far as being able to use it with only 80lb. (Which means I was lifting my entire body-weight minus 80lb. With the assisted-pullup machine smaller numbers are best!)

One evening I was walking to the cinema with my wife and told her I thought I'd be getting close to doing one real pull-up soon, which sounds a little silly, but I guess is pretty common for random men who are 40 as I almost am. As it happens there were some climbing equipment nearby so I said "Here see how close I am", and I proceeded to do 1.5 pullups. (The second one was bad, and didn't count, as I got 90% of the way "up".)

Having had that success I knew I could do "almost two", and I set a goal for the next gym visit: 3 x 3-pullups. I did that. Then I did two more for fun on the way out (couldn't quite manage a complete set.)

So that's the story of how I went from doing 1.5 pullus to doing 11 in less than a week. These days I can easily do 3x3, but struggle with more. It'll come, slowly.

So pull-up vs. chin-up? This just relates to which way you place your hands: palm facing you (chin-up) and palm way from you (pull-up).

Some technical details here but chinups are easier, and more bicep-centric.

Anyway too much writing. My next challenge is the one-armed pushup. However long it takes, and I think it will take a while, that's what I'm working toward.

Categories: LUG Community Blogs

Adam Trickett: Picasa Web: Guernsey 2015

Planet HantsLUG - Thu, 02/07/2015 - 08:00

Long weekend in Guernsey.

Location: Guernsey
Date: 2 Jul 2015
Number of Photos in Album: 82

View Album

Categories: LUG Community Blogs

Daniel Silverstone (Kinnison): Be careful what you ask for

Planet ALUG - Wed, 01/07/2015 - 14:28
Date: Wed, 01 Jul 2015 06:13:16 -0000 From: 123-reg <noreply@123-reg.co.uk> To: dsilvers@digital-scurf.org Subject: Tell us what you think for your chance to win X-Mailer: MIME::Lite 3.027 (F2.74; T1.28; A2.04; B3.13; Q3.13) Tell us what you think of 123-reg! <!-- .style1 {color: #1996d8} -->

Well 123-reg mostly I think you don't know how to do email.

Categories: LUG Community Blogs

Adam Trickett: Bog Roll: Guernsey Walking Holiday 2015 (Day 3+4)

Planet HantsLUG - Mon, 29/06/2015 - 23:55

Yesterday was our last full day on Guernsey as we return to the UK this afternoon. The forecast was good for the morning and not so good in the afternoon, so we decided to walk to the northern tip while it was nice and if needed take the bus back. More beaches and fewer crags on this section of coastline than the southside.

The afternoon wasn't so nice, but it also wasn't too bad so we were still able to walk back to our hotel without getting cold or wet. We have now walked all the eastern seaboard of Guernsey from the southern most point (I think) to it's northern most.

Today is our last day in Guernsey, and we have had a lovely break - I think we will come back but with our bikes and for more than just a flying visit.

As the ferry back to Blighty was in the afternoon, we had several hours to explore the castle that guards the port. It was a few quid to get in, but very interesting with several museums and lots to look at. We had a very nice lunch in the sun at the back of the castle in relative peace, with no pigeons, seagulls or tourists bothering us.

Back to work tomorrow!

Categories: LUG Community Blogs
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