LUG Community Blogs

Steve Kemp: Amazon's Route53 API is nice.

Planet HantsLUG - Fri, 13/06/2014 - 16:03

It is unfortunate that some of the client libraries are inefficient, but I'm enjoying my exposure to Amazon's Route53 API.

(This is unrelated to the previous post(s) about operating a DNS service..)

For an idea of scale I host just over 170 zones at the moment.

For the first 25 zones Amazon would charge $0.50 a month, then $0.10 after that. Which would mean:

25 * $0.50 + 150 * $0.10 = $12.50

That seems reasonably .. reasonable.

Categories: LUG Community Blogs

Jono Bacon: FirefoxOS and Developing Markets

Planet WolvesLUG - Fri, 13/06/2014 - 00:40

It seems Mozilla is targeting emerging markets and developing nations with $25 cell phones. This is tremendous news, and an admirable focus for Mozilla, but it is not without risk.

Bringing simple, accessible technology to these markets can have a profound impact. As an example, in 2001, 134 million Nigerians shared 500,000 land-lines (as covered by Jack Ewing in Businessweek back in 2007). That year the government started encouraging wireless market competition and by 2007 Nigeria had 30 million cellular subscribers.

This generated market competition and better products, but more importantly, we have seen time and time again that access to technology such as cell phones improves education, provides opportunities for people to start small businesses, and in many cases is a contributing factor for bringing people out of poverty.

So, cell phones are having a profound impact in these nations, but the question is, will it work with FirefoxOS?

I am not sure.

In Mozilla’s defence, they have done an admirable job with FirefoxOS. They have built a powerful platform, based on open web technology, and they lined up a raft of carriers to launch with. They have a strong brand, an active and passionate community, and like so many other success stories, they already have a popular existing product (their browser) to get them into meetings and headlines.

Success though is judged by many different factors, and having a raft of carriers and products on the market is not enough. If they ship in volume but get high return rates, it could kill them, as is common for many new product launches.

What I don’t know is whether this volume/return-rate balance plays such a critical role in developing markets. I would imagine that return rates could be higher (such as someone who has never used a cell phone before taking it back because it is just too alien to them). On the other hand, I wonder if those consumers there are willing to put up with more quirks just to get access to the cell network and potentially the Internet.

What seems clear to me is that success here has little to do with the elegance or design of FirefoxOS (or any other product for that matter). It is instead about delivering incredibly dependable hardware. In developing nations people have less access to energy (for charging devices) and have to work harder to obtain it, and have lower access to support resources for how to use new technology. As such, it really needs to just work. This factor, I imagine, is going to be more outside of Mozilla’s hands.

So, in a nutshell, if the $25 phones fail to meet expectations, it may not be Mozilla’s fault. Likewise, if they are successful, it may not be to their credit.

Categories: LUG Community Blogs

Paul Tansom: Beginning irc

Planet HantsLUG - Thu, 12/06/2014 - 17:27

After some discussion last night at PHP Hants about the fact that irc is a great facilitator of support / discussion, but largely ignored because there is rarely enough information for a new user to get going I decided it may be worth putting together a howto type post so here goes…

What is irc?

First of all, what on earth is it? I’m tempted to describe it as Twitter done right years before Twitter even existed, but I’m a geek and I’ve been using irc for years. It has a long heritage, but unlike the ubiquitous email it hasn’t made the transition into mainstream use. In terms of usage it has similarities to things like Twitter and Instant Messaging. Let’s take a quick look at this.

Twitter allows you to broadcast messages, they get published and anyone who is subscribed to your feed can read what you say. Everything is pretty instant, and if somebody is watching the screen at the right time they can respond straight away. Instant Messaging on the other hand, is more of a direct conversation with a single person, or sometimes a group of people, but it too is pretty instantaneous – assuming, of course, that there’s someone reading what you’ve said. Both of these techonologies are pretty familiar to many. If you go to the appropriate website you are given the opportunity to sign up and either use a web based client or download one.

It is much the same for irc in terms of usage, although conversations are grouped into channels which generally focus on a particular topic rather than being generally broadcast (Twitter) or more specifically directed (Instant Messaging). The downside is that in most cases you don’t get a web page with clear instructions of how to sign up, download a client and find where the best place is to join the conversation.

Getting started

There are two things you need to get going with irc, a client and somewhere to connect to. Let’s put that into a more familiar context.

The client is what you use to connect with; this can be an application – so as an example Outlook or Thunderbird would be a mail client, or IE, Firefox, Chrome or Safari are examples of clients for web pages – or it can be a web page that does the same thing – so if you go to twitter.com and login you are using the web page as your Twitter client. Somewhere to connect to can be compared to a web address, or if you’ve got close enough to the configuration of your email to see the details, your mail server address.

Let’s start with the ‘somewhere to connect to‘ bit. Freenode is one of the most popular irc servers, so let’s take a look. First we’ll see what we can find out from their website, http://freenode.net/.

There’s a lot of very daunting information there for somebody new to irc, so ignore most of it and follow the Webchat link on the left.

That’s all very well and good, but what do we put in there? I guess the screenshot above gives a clue, but if you actually visit the page the entry boxes will be blank. Well first off there’s the Nickname, this can be pretty much anything you like, no need to register it – stick to the basics of letters, numbers and some simple punctuation (if you want to), keep it short and so long as nobody else is already using it you should be fine; if it doesn’t work try another. Channels is the awkward one, how do you know what channels there are? If you’re lucky you’re looking into this because you’ve been told there’s a channel there and hopefully you’ve been given the channel name. For now let’s just use the PHP Hants channel, so that would be #phph in the Channels box. Now all you need to do is type in the captcha, ignore the tick boxes and click Connect and you are on the irc channel and ready to chat. Down the right you’ll see a list of who else is there, and in the main window there will be a bit of introductory information (e.g. topic for the channel) and depending on how busy it is anything from nothing to a fast scrolling screen of text.

If you’ve miss typed there’s a chance you’ll end up in a channel specially created for you because it didn’t exist; don’t worry, just quit and try again (I’ll explain that process shortly).

For now all you really need to worry about is typing in text an posting it, this is as simple as typing it into the entry box at the bottom of the page and pressing return. Be polite, be patient and you’ll be fine. There are plenty of commands that you can use to do things, but for now the only one you need to worry about is the one to leave, this is:

/quit

Type it in the entry box, press return and you’ve disconnected from the server. The next thing to look into is using a client program since this is far more flexible, but I’ll save that for another post.

Categories: LUG Community Blogs

Paul Tansom: Beginning irc

Planet ALUG - Thu, 12/06/2014 - 17:27

After some discussion last night at PHP Hants about the fact that irc is a great facilitator of support / discussion, but largely ignored because there is rarely enough information for a new user to get going I decided it may be worth putting together a howto type post so here goes…

What is irc?

First of all, what on earth is it? I’m tempted to describe it as Twitter done right years before Twitter even existed, but I’m a geek and I’ve been using irc for years. It has a long heritage, but unlike the ubiquitous email it hasn’t made the transition into mainstream use. In terms of usage it has similarities to things like Twitter and Instant Messaging. Let’s take a quick look at this.

Twitter allows you to broadcast messages, they get published and anyone who is subscribed to your feed can read what you say. Everything is pretty instant, and if somebody is watching the screen at the right time they can respond straight away. Instant Messaging on the other hand, is more of a direct conversation with a single person, or sometimes a group of people, but it too is pretty instantaneous – assuming, of course, that there’s someone reading what you’ve said. Both of these techonologies are pretty familiar to many. If you go to the appropriate website you are given the opportunity to sign up and either use a web based client or download one.

It is much the same for irc in terms of usage, although conversations are grouped into channels which generally focus on a particular topic rather than being generally broadcast (Twitter) or more specifically directed (Instant Messaging). The downside is that in most cases you don’t get a web page with clear instructions of how to sign up, download a client and find where the best place is to join the conversation.

Getting started

There are two things you need to get going with irc, a client and somewhere to connect to. Let’s put that into a more familiar context.

The client is what you use to connect with; this can be an application – so as an example Outlook or Thunderbird would be a mail client, or IE, Firefox, Chrome or Safari are examples of clients for web pages – or it can be a web page that does the same thing – so if you go to twitter.com and login you are using the web page as your Twitter client. Somewhere to connect to can be compared to a web address, or if you’ve got close enough to the configuration of your email to see the details, your mail server address.

Let’s start with the ‘somewhere to connect to‘ bit. Freenode is one of the most popular irc servers, so let’s take a look. First we’ll see what we can find out from their website, http://freenode.net/.

There’s a lot of very daunting information there for somebody new to irc, so ignore most of it and follow the Webchat link on the left.

That’s all very well and good, but what do we put in there? I guess the screenshot above gives a clue, but if you actually visit the page the entry boxes will be blank. Well first off there’s the Nickname, this can be pretty much anything you like, no need to register it – stick to the basics of letters, numbers and some simple punctuation (if you want to), keep it short and so long as nobody else is already using it you should be fine; if it doesn’t work try another. Channels is the awkward one, how do you know what channels there are? If you’re lucky you’re looking into this because you’ve been told there’s a channel there and hopefully you’ve been given the channel name. For now let’s just use the PHP Hants channel, so that would be #phph in the Channels box. Now all you need to do is type in the captcha, ignore the tick boxes and click Connect and you are on the irc channel and ready to chat. Down the right you’ll see a list of who else is there, and in the main window there will be a bit of introductory information (e.g. topic for the channel) and depending on how busy it is anything from nothing to a fast scrolling screen of text.

If you’ve miss typed there’s a chance you’ll end up in a channel specially created for you because it didn’t exist; don’t worry, just quit and try again (I’ll explain that process shortly).

For now all you really need to worry about is typing in text an posting it, this is as simple as typing it into the entry box at the bottom of the page and pressing return. Be polite, be patient and you’ll be fine. There are plenty of commands that you can use to do things, but for now the only one you need to worry about is the one to leave, this is:

/quit

Type it in the entry box, press return and you’ve disconnected from the server. The next thing to look into is using a client program since this is far more flexible, but I’ll save that for another post.

Categories: LUG Community Blogs

Debian Bits: Introducing the Debian Continuous Integration project

Planet HantsLUG - Wed, 11/06/2014 - 23:01

Debian is a big system. At the time of writing, the unstable distribution has more than 20,000 source packages, building more then 40,000 binary packages on the amd64 architecture. The number of inter-dependencies between binary packages is mind-boggling: the entire dependency graph for the amd64 architecture contains a little more than 375,000 edges. If you want to expand the phrase "package A depends on package B", there are more than 375,000 pairs of packages A and B that can be used.

Every one of these dependencies is a potential source of problems. A library changes the semantics of a function call, and then programs using that library that assumed the previous semantics can start to malfunction. A new version of your favorite programming language comes out, and a program written in it no longer works. The number of ways in which things can go wrong goes on and on.

With an ecosystem as big as Debian, it is just impossible to stop these problems from happening. What we can do is trying to detect when they happen, and fix them as soon as possible.

The Debian Continuous Integration project was created to address exactly this problem. It will continuously run test suites for source packages when any of their dependencies is updated, as well as when a new version of the package itself is uploaded to the unstable distribution. If any problems that can be detected by running an automated test suite arise, package maintainers can be notified in a matter of hours.

Antonio Terceiro has posted on his blog an introduction to the project with a more detailed description of the project, its evolution since January 2014 when it was first introduced, an explanation of how the system works, and how maintainers can enable test suites for their packages. You might also want to check the documentation directly.

Categories: LUG Community Blogs

Jono Bacon: Community Management Training at OSCON, LinuxCon North America, and LinuxCon Europe

Planet WolvesLUG - Wed, 11/06/2014 - 18:55

I am a firm believer in building strong and empowered communities. We are in an age of a community management renaissance in which we are defining repeatable best practice that can be applied many different types of communities, whether internal to companies, external to volunteers, or a mix of both.

I have been working to further this growth in community management via my books, The Art of Community and Dealing With Disrespect, the Community Leadership Summit, the Community Leadership Forum, and delivering training to our next generation of community managers and leaders.

Last year I ran my first community management training course, and it was very positively received. I am delighted to announce that I will be running an updated training course at three events over the coming months.

OSCON

On Sunday 20th July 2014 I will be presenting the course at the OSCON conference in Portland, Oregon. This is a tutorial, so you will need to purchase a tutorial ticket to attend. Attendance is limited, so be sure to get to the class early on the day to reserve a seat!

Find Out More

LinuxCon North America and Europe

I am delighted to bring my training to the excellent LinuxCon events in both North America and Europe.

Firstly, on Fri 22nd August 2014 I will be presenting the course at LinuxCon North America in Chicago, Illinois and then on Thurs Oct 16th 2014 I will deliver the training at LinuxCon Europe in Düsseldorf, Germany.

Tickets are $300 for the day’s training. This is a steal; I usually charge $2500+/day when delivering the training as part of a consultancy arrangement. Thanks to the Linux Foundation for making this available at an affordable rate.

Space is limited, so go and register ASAP:

What Is Covered

So what is in the training course?

My goal with each training day is to discuss how to build and grow a community, including building collaborative workflows, defining a governance structure, planning, marketing, and evaluating effectiveness. The day is packed with Q&A, discussion, and I encourage my students to raise questions, challenge me, and explore ways of optimizing their communities. This is not a sit-down-and-listen-to-a-teacher-drone on kind of session; it is interactive and designed to spark discussion.

The day is mapped out like this:

  • 9.00am – Welcome and introductions
  • 9.30am – The core mechanics of community
  • 10.00am – Planning your community
  • 10.30am – Building a strategic plan
  • 11.00am – Building collaborative workflow
  • 12.00pm – Governance: Part I
  • 12.30pm – Lunch
  • 1.30pm – Governance: Part II
  • 2.00pm – Marketing, advocacy, promotion, and social
  • 3.00pm – Measuring your community
  • 3.30pm – Tracking, measuring community management
  • 4.30pm – Burnout and conflict resolution
  • 5.00pm – Finish

I will warn you; it is an exhausting day, but ultimately rewarding. It covers a lot of ground in a short period of time, and then you can follow with further discussion of these and other topics on our Community Leadership discussion forum.

I hope to see you there!

Categories: LUG Community Blogs

Dick Turpin: Old Tom

Planet WolvesLUG - Thu, 05/06/2014 - 12:58
So most of you will have heard my complaints about the difficulty in simply being able to order fish and chips from the chip shop? Well it would seem there are many other opportunities out there to eat up your lunch hour when trying to buy something.

A well known UK car accessory outlet.

Me: "Hi there can I have a Tom Tom Start 25 UK & ROF @ £99.99 please?"
Assistant: "Do you want the maps for life?"
Me: "Oh Christ, here we go! No thank you."
Assistant: "Do you want the European maps?"
Me: [Sobbing gently] "Could I just have the Tom Tom I asked for please?"
Assistant: "OK I'll go and fetch one."
Categories: LUG Community Blogs

David Goodwin: Automated twitter compilation up to 04 June 2014

Planet WolvesLUG - Wed, 04/06/2014 - 12:41

Arbitrary tweets made by TheGingerDog up to 04 June 2014

Categories: LUG Community Blogs

David Goodwin: Automated twitter compilation up to 01 June 2014

Planet WolvesLUG - Sun, 01/06/2014 - 06:00

Arbitrary tweets made by TheGingerDog up to 01 June 2014

  • RT Apologies but the #psychic fayre at Finstall Park has been cancelled due to unforeseen circumstances. 2014/05/31
  • RT 2 great PHP conferences this autumn in the UK: #Symfony_Live & #PHPNW14. Wonder if I either will let me do a talk 2014/05/30
  • RT As we await the Apple iWatch, don’t forget that in 1984 Seiko made an iWatch — of sorts. And boy it was awesome.

2014/05/30

  • RT One of the best #PHP conferences in the world is back for 2014, and is looking for sponsors. conference.phpnw.org.uk/phpnw14/sponsors/sponsorship-packages/ 2014/05/30
  • The coop parking enforcer is out and going to be quite rich today it seems. Bromsgrove 2014/05/30
  • Sainsburys at Hundred House (Stourbridge road, Bromsgrove)? Alcohol licence application notice.
  • Bromsgrove 2014/05/29

  • New Hair ! #goodHairDay #selfie
  • Bromsgrove 2014/05/29

  • Haha. It appears my evil plan involving a weakened beer bottle and a car boot worked ! #brotherlylove Bromsgrove 2014/05/26
  • Whoops! Didn’t vote ukip. #noukip West Midlands, United Kingdom 2014/05/22
  • .@moreteadoctor the children have been shouting “‘ERE SHEILA!” for 10 mins in this playground. You have a lot to answer for. #memoryLivesOn Bromsgrove 2014/05/22
  • RT #WhyImVotingUkip DISGRACE!!!! This is one of meny!1!
  • 2014/05/20

  • RT #WhyImVotingUkip Because the weather’s really starting to pick up, and I don’t want it ruined by gays. 2014/05/21
  • RT Because if the gays obtain control over the weather it might start raining men, and they will probably be Romanian #WhyImVotingUkip 2014/05/21
  • RT #WhyImVotingUkip Because these immigrants can’t speak proper English! Oh wait a minute…
  • 2014/05/21

  • RT #WhyImVotingUkip because my university is being overrun by Librarians and we need to send them back to Libraria 2014/05/21
  • RT Worrying signs that the girl will be a javascript programmer. “Sometimes, Daddy, 5 and 5 makes 55 and sometimes it makes 10.” 2014/05/17
  • RT eBay hacked. They say that stolen user passwords were encrypted, ask users to change passwords anyway. https://blog.ebay.com/ebay-inc-ask-ebay-users-change-passwords/ 2014/05/21
  • At school early for once. No doubt they’ll be late out today. #schoolrun West Midlands, United Kingdom 2014/05/21
  • RT Virgin Media #facebooknews
  • 2014/05/21

  • RT Tried as I might, I could not get this damn thing to work. Seen at airport.
  • 2014/05/20

  • Somewhat surprised that a government information site (ratings.food.gov.uk) has been offline for ~6 days. #fail #hygiene Bromsgrove 2014/05/20
  • RT Just finished my second listen-through of ‘Harvey’ by Phil Rossi. I still love the story. You can listen free here: podiobooks.com/title/harvey/ 2014/05/19
  • RT Computer timings in perspective:
  • 2014/05/17

  • Lawn mowed. Decking had a second coat of brown stuff. 25% of study painted. No children drowned. Forest explored. Den made. #today Bromsgrove 2014/05/18
  • TIL – don’t mess with massive lizards. #Godzilla2014 Birmingham 2014/05/17
  • Godzilla o’clock. 2014/05/17
  • “Couldn’t think of an image for this slide”… Thanks. @jukesie #port80
  • Newport 2014/05/16

  • RT Amazingly clever, and somewhat manipulative talk by @roy on neuro-marketing in user experience. #mindblown #Port80
  • 2014/05/16

  • “Don’t worry it’s only marketers collecting our personal information … ” #port80 (thanks @kwe)
  • Newport 2014/05/16

  • RT Watching someone try to get through a spam captcha using voice commands is painful! Cc/ @kimberleytew #port80 2014/05/16
  • RT Next up at @Port80Events is @roy talking about the human brain & what makes people click
  • 2014/05/16

  • Cool brain anatomy lesson with @roy at #port80 … Hopefully we won’t be fighting bears to design websites … #betterSafeThanSorry Newport 2014/05/16
  • Now: @nathan_ford “Mastering the dark art of fluid layout.” — if only I could learn everything about it in a 45min talk #port80 #webdesign Newport 2014/05/16
  • RT Recommended reading from @hereinthehiveElement Queries, From the Feet Up
    www.backalleycoder.com/2014/04/18/element-queries-from-the-feet-up/
    #port80 2014/05/16
  • Thank you @hereinthehive #port80 Newport 2014/05/16
  • Css Breakpoints. Responsive & fluid design. Progressive enhancement. Device type. Reusability. Modularity.
    patternlab.io #port80 Newport 2014/05/16
  • “Failure is only the opportunity to begin again intelligently.”
    “Do it again …like a baby” … #port80 Newport 2014/05/16
  • Power pose time!
    Thanks @denisejacobs #port80 Newport 2014/05/16
  • RT Letter of the week, from May 10 issue of @TheEconomist.
  • 2014/05/15

  • It looks like the parking attendants are fining people today who are parking incorrectly outside coop. #bromsgrove Bromsgrove 2014/05/15
  • Yesterday I mowed the lawn (1st time for me), stained the decking and fitted a new light. Today may be tame in comparison. Bromsgrove 2014/05/15
  • throw new TooHotForAJumperException(“missing the rain ?”); Bromsgrove 2014/05/15
  • RT Bloody Polish: coming over here and teaching us proper English. Vote Ukip, and stop this outrage via @georgephilipb
  • 2014/05/12

  • RT “@mental_floss: U.S. banned the sale of lawn darts in 1988. Parents were urged to “destroy them immediately.”” – meanwhile assault rifles.. 2014/05/13
  • The woman driving k80 anm would do well to look before crossing mini roundabouts. #ifOnlyInsurersCheckedTwitter #driving Bromsgrove 2014/05/13
  • RT How to use friendship.js
  • 2014/05/13

  • Real life HITMAN youtu.be/hKEjM9gF4UQ via @YouTube (it was an awesome film) 2014/05/13
  • RT artificial intelligence, technology of the future — always has been, always will be. #DualismTheBook 2014/05/13
  • The early bird is tired. #airport #taxi #conscript Bromsgrove 2014/05/13
  • RT OK. I give up. Just put the apostrophes where you like Dorothy Perkins.
  • 2014/05/09

  • Drawing Eyebrows On Babies – The Best Of www.anorak.co.uk/397145/strange-but-true/drawing-eyebrows-on-babies-the-best-of.html/ via @TheAnorak 2014/05/12
  • RT 10 Great Reasons to vote #UKIP. I don’t know who made it – so I referenced it from official #UKIP websites
  • 2014/05/05

  • Achievement unlocked : Plumbing 102.
    Fixed leaking stop tap gland.
    Fixed leaking hot water joint. #relieved #EasyFix Bromsgrove 2014/05/11
  • Rowan ran 5km today in his first fun run. He was very happy to have a medal.
  • Bromsgrove 2014/05/11

  • RT Wow. Such elePHPants. Much PHP.
  • 2014/05/06

  • With my psychic powers I predict there will be more painting taking place soon. Bromsgrove 2014/05/11
  • I can’t see the tires on this light. Tier perhaps?
  • Bromsgrove 2014/05/10

  • RT UK surveillance oversight in action (yes, this is a real exchange):
  • 2014/05/09

  • Bromsgrove has a fair this week.
  • Bromsgrove 2014/05/08

  • RT when someone says “giving 110%” this is what they mean i.imgur.com/uFDRzSN.gif 2014/05/06
  • RT A wood near Bromsgrove yesterday. The colour & scent were amazing! @WoodlandTrust
  • 2014/05/06

  • Now to see if the house has flooded while I’ve been out. #noPuddleYet Bromsgrove 2014/05/06
  • There’s nothing like chasing another runner (and beating them) to make you speed up and push yourself that bit more. #sweatingLikeAPig Bromsgrove 2014/05/06
  • Arrangements sorted for @Port80Events … May 16th. Newport. All the cool kids will be there (and me). #port80 #webdesign Bromsgrove 2014/05/06
  • RT They were planning an attack on an EDL demo with guns, knives, and an improvised explosive (pictured) #WMCTU
  • 2014/05/06

  • And now …. to run. Run like the wind. Bromsgrove 2014/05/06
  • Achievement unlocked: Plumbing 101 – outside tap replacement. #WorkingHose #BewareCat
  • Bromsgrove 2014/05/06

  • RT Gotten quite a few photo requests for this underdoge: @dogecoin @Josh_Wise @PPR98. #VeryDega #SuchWow #NASCAR
  • 2014/05/04

  • RT Check out the product placement on this…
  • 2014/05/04

  • RT How very very true — who the slave and who the master? (via @elvis717)
  • 2014/05/04

  • RT Learning how to map disease breakout areas using #OpenStreetMap at @ukodi with @msf_uk 2014/05/03
  • RT Hey @ITISLENNYHENRY. You’ve got to to see this. Genius via @beaubodor #YouKip
  • 2014/05/03

  • Unimpressed by The Amazing Spiderman 2 (not worth paying for). Divergent seemed better. Bromsgrove 2014/05/04
  • This is good Bombay mix like stuff. (Farari Chevra).
  • Bromsgrove 2014/05/04

  • Yum yum. Tasty chocolates from Brussels. (Van Dender)
  • Bromsgrove 2014/05/04

  • RT “£130?! For one night?! I paid less for her. NO F*CKING WAY!” Shouts the drunk guy, with a hooker, at Premier Inn reception. Oh dear oh dear 2014/05/03
  • My house has been invaded by lots of noisy women. Time to plan my escape to the cinema or something …. Bromsgrove 2014/05/03
  • RT 2048 for Atari 2600:
    2048 for Commodore 64
  • 2014/05/03

  • RT Everyone has to work.
    That’s what family farms do.
  • 2014/05/03

    Categories: LUG Community Blogs

    Dick Turpin: Four coaches.

    Planet WolvesLUG - Sat, 31/05/2014 - 18:15
    I am living proof of those people who say "You know if I wrote a book about it nobody would believe it!"

    So I went to visit my daddy today in Birmingham QE hospital. I caught the train to Birmingham and had to change for University station. I spied a guy in blue offering platform information at Birmingham and made my way towards him. Mr Blue coat (I have no idea what they're called?) was just about to help a very smartly dressed guy who looked to be in his early twenties.

    Passenger: "Can you tell me where to go for the 13.20 to blah blah blah?" (I forget where now)
    Mr Blue: "Platform 7 sir."
    Passenger: "Platform 7? You sure?"
    Mr Blue: "Yes sir, platform 7"
    Passenger: "It says four coaches?"
    Mr Blue: "That's right sir."
    Passenger: "So there's no tracks at platform 7 then?"
    Mr Blue: "I'm Sorry?"
    Passenger: "I've never heard of coaches stopping at platforms before?"
    Mr Blue: "The train is made up of four coaches sir."

    Me and Mr Blue pissed ourselves silly once he was out of reasonable earshot.
    Categories: LUG Community Blogs

    Jono Bacon: Last Day Today

    Planet WolvesLUG - Thu, 29/05/2014 - 16:34

    Recently I announced I am stepping down as Ubuntu Community Manager at Canonical and moving to XPRIZE as Senior Director of Community. Today is my last day at Canonical.

    I just want to say how touched I have been by the response. The comments, social media posts, emails, and calls from you have been so kind and supportive. You are all good people, and I am going to miss every single one of you.

    The reason why I have devoted my life to understanding communities is that I believe communities bring out the best in people, and all of you are a perfect example of that. I cannot express just how much I appreciate it.

    Over the course of the next few weeks my replacement will be sourced and announced. and in the interim my team (Daniel Holbach, Michael Hall, David Planella, Nicholas Skaggs, Alan Pope) will take over my duties. Everything has been transitioned over, and remember, the weekly Q&As will continue at 6pm UTC every Tuesday on Ubuntu On Air with my team filling in for me. As ever, any and all Ubuntu questions are welcome!

    Of course, I will still be around. I am going to continue to be a member of the Ubuntu community and an avid Ubuntu user, tester, and supporter. I will continue to be on IRC, you can email me at jono@jonobacon.org, I will continue to do Bad Voltage, and I have a busy schedule at the Community Leadership Summit, OSCON, and more. I am also going to continue to have my own Q&A session every week where you can ask questions about my perspectives on Ubuntu, Canonical, community management, XPRIZE, and more; I will announce this soon.

    Ubuntu has a tremendous future ahead of it, built on the hard work and passion of a global community. We are only just getting started with a new era of Ubuntu convergence and cloud orchestration and while I will miss being there in an official capacity, I am just thankful that I can continue to be along for the ride in the very community I played a part in building.

    I now have a few weeks off and then my new adventure begins. Stay tuned.

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