LUG Community Blogs

New Challenges and Adventure Awaits

Planet SurreyLUG - Mon, 03/11/2014 - 21:31
Today is a good day! Decisions were made, some decisions are hard to make that require over thinking and analysing and others are a lot easier as you know they are just right! This one was easy to make! Today I accepted a new role and a new challenge. I am looking forward to starting […]
Categories: LUG Community Blogs

Ubuntu Scopes Contest Wishlist

Planet SurreyLUG - Mon, 03/11/2014 - 09:44

We’re running a Scope Development Competition with prizes including a laptop, tablets, and a bunch of cool Ubuntu swag. Check the above link for details.

I’m one of the judges, so I’m not allowed to enter which is both good and bad news. Good because then you won’t see my terrible coding quality, but bad because I would really love one of these sweet Dell XPS laptops!

I do have things I’d like to see made as scopes, and some ideas for making ones that I might do in the future when time permits, and I thought I’d share them. As a judge I’m not saying “make this scope and I’ll vote for your entry” of course, I simply figured I can give people some ideas, if they’re stuck. We do have a set of criteria (see link above) for rating the scopes that are submitted, and those will be used for judging. None of those criteria are “whether it was on the list on popey’s blog”. These are just ideas to get people thinking about what might be possible / useful with a scope.

Surfacing my data

One of the goals of scopes is to enable users to easily and quickly get access to their data. That could be local data on the device or remote data in a silo somewhere online. Typically on other platforms you’d need a dedicated app to get at that data. To access your Spotify playlist you need the Spotify app, to access your LinkedIn data you need the LinkedIn app and so on. Many of the sites and services where my data is held is accessible via an API of some kind. I’d love to see scopes created to surface that data directly to my face when I want it.

Manage Spotify Playlist

I use and love Spotify. One problem I have is that I don’t often add new music to my playlists. I don’t use or value the search function in the app, or the social connected features (I don’t have my Spotify hooked up to Facebook, and don’t have any friends on Facebook anyway). I tend to add new music when I’m having a real life verbal conversation with people, or when listening to the radio.

So what I would like is some quick and easy way to add tracks to my playlist, which I can subsequently play later when I’m not in the pub / driving / listening to the radio during breakfast. This could possibly sign in to Spotify using my credentials, allow me to search for tracks and then use the API to add tracks to playlist

Amazon Wishlist

My family tell me I’m really hard to buy presents for, especially at this time of year. I disagree as I have an Amazon wishlist containing over a hundred items at all price points When I visit family they may ask what’s on my wishlist to find out what I’m most interested in.

I’d like to be able to pull out my phone, and with a couple of swipes show them my wishlist. It would also be useful if it had the ability to ‘share’ the wishlist URL over some method (email is one, SMS might be another) so they get their own copy to peruse later.

I’d also like to be able to add things to the wishlist easily. Often when I’m out I think “That’s cool, would love one of those” and that could be achieved with a simple search function, then add to my wishlist.

Location Specific Satellites Overhead

I (and my kids) like to watch the International Space Station go over. Perhaps I enjoy it more than the kids who are made to stand outside in the cold, but whatever. When I travel it would be nice to have a scope which I can turn to during twilight hours to see when the ISS (or indeed other satellites) are passing overhead. This information appears to be publicly available via well documented APIs.

Upcoming TV Programmes

I frequently forget that my favourite TV programmes are on, or available to stream. It would be awesome to pull together data from somewhere like Trakt and show me which of my most loved programmes are going to be broadcast soon, on what local TV channel.

Events Nearby

When I travel I like to know if there’s any music, social or tech events on locally that I might be interested in going to. There’s quite a few sites where people post their events including Songkick, Meetup and Eventbrite (among many others I’m sure) which have a local event look-up API. One of the cool things about scopes is you can aggregate content from multiple scopes together. So there could be a scope for each of the above mentioned sites, plus a general “Local Events” scope which pulls data from all of those together. Going to one scope and refreshing when I arrive in a new location would be a great quick way to find out what’s on locally.

Some of the above may be impractical or not possible due to API limitations or other technical issues, they’re just some ideas I had when thinking about what I would like to see on my phone. I’m sure others can come up with great ideas too! Let your imagination run wild!

Good luck to all those entering the contest!

Categories: LUG Community Blogs

Alan Pope: Ubuntu Scopes Contest Wishlist

Planet HantsLUG - Mon, 03/11/2014 - 09:44

We’re running a Scope Development Competition with prizes including a laptop, tablets, and a bunch of cool Ubuntu swag. Check the above link for details.

I’m one of the judges, so I’m not allowed to enter which is both good and bad news. Good because then you won’t see my terrible coding quality, but bad because I would really love one of these sweet Dell XPS laptops!

I do have things I’d like to see made as scopes, and some ideas for making ones that I might do in the future when time permits, and I thought I’d share them. As a judge I’m not saying “make this scope and I’ll vote for your entry” of course, I simply figured I can give people some ideas, if they’re stuck. We do have a set of criteria (see link above) for rating the scopes that are submitted, and those will be used for judging. None of those criteria are “whether it was on the list on popey’s blog”. These are just ideas to get people thinking about what might be possible / useful with a scope.

Surfacing my data

One of the goals of scopes is to enable users to easily and quickly get access to their data. That could be local data on the device or remote data in a silo somewhere online. Typically on other platforms you’d need a dedicated app to get at that data. To access your Spotify playlist you need the Spotify app, to access your LinkedIn data you need the LinkedIn app and so on. Many of the sites and services where my data is held is accessible via an API of some kind. I’d love to see scopes created to surface that data directly to my face when I want it.

Manage Spotify Playlist

I use and love Spotify. One problem I have is that I don’t often add new music to my playlists. I don’t use or value the search function in the app, or the social connected features (I don’t have my Spotify hooked up to Facebook, and don’t have any friends on Facebook anyway). I tend to add new music when I’m having a real life verbal conversation with people, or when listening to the radio.

So what I would like is some quick and easy way to add tracks to my playlist, which I can subsequently play later when I’m not in the pub / driving / listening to the radio during breakfast. This could possibly sign in to Spotify using my credentials, allow me to search for tracks and then use the API to add tracks to playlist

Amazon Wishlist

My family tell me I’m really hard to buy presents for, especially at this time of year. I disagree as I have an Amazon wishlist containing over a hundred items at all price points When I visit family they may ask what’s on my wishlist to find out what I’m most interested in.

I’d like to be able to pull out my phone, and with a couple of swipes show them my wishlist. It would also be useful if it had the ability to ‘share’ the wishlist URL over some method (email is one, SMS might be another) so they get their own copy to peruse later.

I’d also like to be able to add things to the wishlist easily. Often when I’m out I think “That’s cool, would love one of those” and that could be achieved with a simple search function, then add to my wishlist.

Location Specific Satellites Overhead

I (and my kids) like to watch the International Space Station go over. Perhaps I enjoy it more than the kids who are made to stand outside in the cold, but whatever. When I travel it would be nice to have a scope which I can turn to during twilight hours to see when the ISS (or indeed other satellites) are passing overhead. This information appears to be publicly available via well documented APIs.

Upcoming TV Programmes

I frequently forget that my favourite TV programmes are on, or available to stream. It would be awesome to pull together data from somewhere like Trakt and show me which of my most loved programmes are going to be broadcast soon, on what local TV channel.

Events Nearby

When I travel I like to know if there’s any music, social or tech events on locally that I might be interested in going to. There’s quite a few sites where people post their events including Songkick, Meetup and Eventbrite (among many others I’m sure) which have a local event look-up API. One of the cool things about scopes is you can aggregate content from multiple scopes together. So there could be a scope for each of the above mentioned sites, plus a general “Local Events” scope which pulls data from all of those together. Going to one scope and refreshing when I arrive in a new location would be a great quick way to find out what’s on locally.

Some of the above may be impractical or not possible due to API limitations or other technical issues, they’re just some ideas I had when thinking about what I would like to see on my phone. I’m sure others can come up with great ideas too! Let your imagination run wild!

Good luck to all those entering the contest!

Categories: LUG Community Blogs

Chris Lamb: Generating gradiented fade images using ImageMagick

Planet ALUG - Mon, 03/11/2014 - 08:42

Whilst gradienting images is certainly possible with CSS, current browser support means that it can still make sense to do it yourself, especially if front-end performance is a concern.

However, to avoid manual work in Gimp or Photoshop, you can use ImageMagick to generate them for you:

$ wget --quiet -Obackground.jpg http://i.imgur.com/WCjlJ.jpg $ convert background.jpg \ -alpha set -channel A \ -sparse-color Barycentric '%w,%[fx:h-300] opaque %w,%h transparent' \ -background '#ffcc32' -flatten \ background-gradiented.jpg

300 here refers to the height or "speed" of the gradient and the target colour is specified by with -background.

Before:

After:

Categories: LUG Community Blogs

Surrey LUG Bring-A-Box 8th Nov 2014, Lion Brewery

Surrey LUG - Sun, 02/11/2014 - 23:19
Start: 2014-11-08 11:00 End: 2014-11-08 17:00

We have regular sessions on the second Saturday of each month. Bring a 'box', bring a notebook, bring anything that might run Linux, or just bring yourself and enjoy socialising/learning/teaching or simply chilling out!

This month's meeting is at the Lion Brewery Pub in Ash, Surrey.

New members are very welcome. We're not a cliquey bunch, so you won't feel out of place! Usually between 15 and 30 people come along.

Categories: LUG Community Blogs

Steve Kemp: IPv6 only server

Planet HantsLUG - Sun, 02/11/2014 - 10:54

I enjoy the tilde.club site/community, and since I've just setup an IPv6-only host I was looking to do something similar.

Unfortunately my (working) code to clone github repositories into per-user directories fails - because github isn't accessible over IPv6.

That's a shame.

Oddly enough chromium, the browser packaged for wheezy, doesn't want to display IPv6-only websites either. For example this site fail to load http://ipv6.steve.org.uk/.

In the meantime I've got a server setup which is only accessible over IPv6 and I'm a little smug. (http://ipv6.website/).

(Yes it is true that I've used all the IPv4 addreses allocated to my VLAN. That's just a coincidence. Ssh!)

Categories: LUG Community Blogs

Chris Lamb: Are you building an internet fridge?

Planet ALUG - Thu, 30/10/2014 - 18:00

Mikkel Rasmussen:

If you look at the idea of "The Kitchen of Tomorrow" as IKEA thought about it is the core idea is that cooking is slavery.

It's the idea that technology can free us from making food. It can do it for us. It can recognise who we are, we don't have to be tied to the kitchen all day, we don't have to think about it.

Now if you're an anthropologist, they would tell you that cooking is perhaps one of the most complicated things you can think about when it comes to the human condition. If you think about your own cooking habits they probably come from your childhood, the nation you're from, the region you're from. It takes a lot of skill to cook. It's not so easy.

And actually, it's quite fun to cook. there's also a lot of improvisation. I don't know if you ever tried to come home to a fridge and you just look into the fridge: oh, there's a carrot and some milk and some white wine and you figure it out. That's what cooking is like – it's a very human thing to do.

The physical version of your smart recipe site?


Therefore, if you think about it, having anything that automates this for you or decides for you or improvises for you is actually not doing anything to help you with what you want to do, which is that it's nice to cook.

More generally, if you make technology—for example—that has at its core the idea that cooking is slavery and that idea is wrong, then your technology will fail. Not because of the technology, but because it simply gets people wrong.

This happens all the time. You cannot swing a cat these days without hitting one of those refrigerator companies that make smart fridges. I don't know you've ever seen them, like a "intelligent fridge". There's so many of them that there is actually a website called "Fuck your internet fridge" by a guy who tracks failed prototypes on intelligent fridges.

Why? Because the idea is wrong. Not the technology, but the idea about who we are - that we do not want the kitchen to be automated for us.

We want to cook. We want Japanese knives. We want complicated cooking. And so what we are saying here is not that technology is wrong as such. It's just you need to base it—especially when you are innovating really big ideas—on something that's a true human insight. And cooking as slavery is not a true human insight and therefore the prototypes will fail.

(I hereby nominate "internet fridge" as the term to describe products or ideas that—whilst technologically sound—is based on fundamentally flawed anthropology.)

Hearing "I hate X" and thinking that simply removing X will provide real value to your users is short-sighted, especially when you don't really understand why humans are doing X in the first place.

Categories: LUG Community Blogs

Steve Kemp: A brief introduction to freebsd

Planet HantsLUG - Wed, 29/10/2014 - 18:37

I've spent the past thirty minutes installing FreeBSD as a KVM guest. This mostly involved fetching the ISO (I chose the latest stable release 10.0), and accepting all the defaults. A pleasant experience.

As I'm running KVM inside screen I wanted to see the boot prompt, etc, via the serial console, which took two distinct steps:

  • Enabling the serial console - which lets boot stuff show up
  • Enabling a login prompt on the serial console in case I screw up the networking.

To configure boot messages to display via the serial console, issue the following command as the superuser:

# echo 'console="comconsole"' >> /boot/loader.conf

To get a login: prompt you'll want to edit /etc/ttys and change "off" to "on" and "dialup" to "vt100" for the ttyu0 entry. Once you've done that reload init via:

# kill -HUP 1

Enable remote root logins, if you're brave, or disable PAM and password authentication if you're sensible:

vi /etc/ssh/sshd_config /etc/rc.d/sshd restart

Configure the system to allow binary package-installation - to be honest I was hazy on why this was required, but I ran the two command and it all worked out:

pkg pkg2ng

Now you may install a package via a simple command such as:

pkg add screen

Removing packages you no longer want is as simple as using the delete option:

pkg delete curl

You can see installed packages via "pkg info", and there are more options to be found via "pkg help". In the future you can apply updates via:

pkg update && pkg upgrade

Finally I've installed 10.0-RELEASE which can be upgraded in the future via "freebsd-update" - This seems to boil down to "freebsd-update fetch" and "freebsd-update install" but I'm hazy on that just yet. For the moment you can see your installed version via:

uname -a ; freebsd-version

Expect my future CPAN releases, etc, to be tested on FreeBSD too now :)

Categories: LUG Community Blogs

Steve Engledow (stilvoid): When all the things went wrong

Planet ALUG - Mon, 27/10/2014 - 23:34

The last few weeks have seen several bits of technology fail that affect my everyday life.

It started with the locks on my car beginning to seize up. To begin with, they were just a bit stiff, then one of them stopped working altogether. Then they all stopped working with any regularity. I took the car to a garage who told me it's a common problem with this exact model and charged me £100 to replace the driver's side lock. Apparently, a full set would cost around £600.

So now I'm left with two car keys; one to get in, and one for the ignition.

Second, I somehow left the cable for my bicycle light charger hanging out of the car door on a journey. When I arrived, I found it looking quite mangled.

Thirdly, last night when my wife came home, she and I both turned our keys in the lock at the same time from different sides of the front door (without realising). This somehow broke the damn lock. Now the key doesn't turn all the way and the door can be locked but the key must remain in it.

So now we have to leave by the back door.

Fourth, while at rehearsal tonight with my band, my keyboard started playing up; it complains that the battery is low whilst running off mains power. Thinking maybe the adapter was playing up, I tried another with the same result.

Bleh.

Categories: LUG Community Blogs

Meeting at "The Moon Under Water"

Wolverhampton LUG News - Mon, 27/10/2014 - 09:57
Event-Date: Wednesday, 29 October, 2014 - 19:30 to 23:00Body: 53-55 Lichfield St Wolverhampton West Midlands WV1 1EQ Eat, Drink and talk Linux
Categories: LUG Community Blogs
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