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Alan Pope: XDA Developer Conference 2014

Wed, 01/10/2014 - 10:09

The XDA Developer community had its second conference last weekend, this time in Manchester, UK. We were asked to sponsor the event and were happy to do so. I went along with Daniel Holbach from the Community Team and Ondrej Kubik from the Phone Delivery Team at Canonical.

This was my first non-Ubuntu conference for a while, so it was interesting for me to meet people from so many different projects. As well as us representing Ubuntu Phone, there were guys from the Jolla project showing off SailfishOS and their handset and ports. Asa Dotzler was also there to represent Mozilla & FirefoxOS.

Daniel did a small Ubuntu app development workshop which enabled us to learn a lot from our materials and process around App Dev Schools which we’ll feed back to later sessions. Ondrej gave a talk to a packed room about hardware bring-up and porting Ubuntu to other devices. It was well receieved and explained the platform nicely. I talked about the history of Ubuntu phone and what the future might hold.

There were other sponsor booths including big names like nVidia showing off the Sheild tablet and Sony demonstrating their rather bizarre Smart EyeGlass technology. Oppo and OnePlus had plenty of devices to lust after too including giant phones with beautiful displays. I enjoyed a bunch of the talks including MediaTek making a big announcement, and demonstrating their new LinkIT One platform.

The ~200 attendees were mostly pretty geeky guys whose ages ranged from 15 to 50. There were Android developers, ROM maintainers, hardware hackers and tech enthusiasts who all seemed very friendly and open to discuss all kinds of tech subjects at every opportunity.

One thing I’d not seen at other conferences which was big at XDA:DevCon was the hardware give-aways. The organisers had obtained a lot of tech from the sponsors to give away. This ranged from phone covers through bluetooth speakers, mobile printers, hardware hacking kits through to phones, smart watches & tablets, including an Oppo Find 7, pebble watch and nVidia Sheild & controller. These were often handed out as a ‘reward’ for attendees asking good questions, or as (free) raffle prizes. It certainly kept everyone on their toes and happy! I was delighted to see an Ubuntu community member get the Oppo Find 7 I was rewarded with an Anker MP141 Portable Bluetooth Speaker during one talk for some reason

On the whole I found the conference to be an incredibly friendly, well organised event. There was plenty of food and drink at break times and coffee and snacks in between with relaxing beers in the evening. A great conference which I’d certainly go to again.

Categories: LUG Community Blogs

Steve Kemp: Next week I shall be mostly in Kraków

Fri, 26/09/2014 - 17:20

Next week my wife and I shall be mostly visiting Poland, and spending a week in Kraków.

It has been a while since I've had a non-Helsinki-based holiday, so I'm looking forward to the trip.

In other news I've been rationalising DNS entries and domain names recently, all being well this zone should be served by Amazon shortly, subject to the usual combination of TTLs and resolution-puns.

Categories: LUG Community Blogs

Steve Kemp: Today I mostly removed python

Thu, 25/09/2014 - 19:11

Much has already been written about the recent bash security problem, allocated the CVE identifier CVE-2014-6271, so I'm not even going to touch it.

It did remind me to double-check my systems to make sure that I didn't have any packages installed that I didn't need though, because obviously having fewer packages installed and fewer services running reduces the potential attack surface.

I had noticed in the past I had python installed and just though "Oh, yeah, I must have python utilities running". It turns out though that on 16 out of 19 servers I control I had python installed solely for the lsb_release script!

So I hacked up a horrible replacement for `lsb_release in pure shell, and then became cruel:

~ # dpkg --purge python python-minimal python2.7 python2.7-minimal lsb-release

That horrible replacement is horrible because it defers detection of all the names/numbers to the /etc/os-release which wasn't present in earlier versions of Debian. Happily all my Debian GNU/Linux hosts run Wheezy or later, so it all works out.

So that left three hosts that had a legitimate use for Python:

  • My mail-host runs offlineimap
    • So I purged it.
    • I replaced it with isync.
  • My host-machine runs KVM guests, via qemu-kvm.
    • qemu-kvm depends on Python solely for the script /usr/bin/kvm_stat.
    • I'm not pleased about that but will tolerate it for now.
  • The final host was my ex-mercurial host.
    • Since I've switched to git I just removed tha package.

So now 1/19 hosts has Python installed. I'm not averse to the language, but given that I don't personally develop in it very often (read "once or twice in the past year") and by accident I had no python-scripts installed I see no reason to keep it on the off-chance.

My biggest surprise of the day was that now that we can use dash as our default shell we still can't purge bash. Since it is marked as Essential. Perhaps in the future.

Categories: LUG Community Blogs

Steve Kemp: Waiting for features upstream

Tue, 23/09/2014 - 20:42

I (grudgingly) use the Calibre e-book management software to handle my collection of books, and copy them over to my kindle-toy.

One thing that has always bothered me was the fact that when books are imported their ratings are too. If I receive a small sample of ebooks from a friend their ratings are added to my collections.

I've always regarded ratings as things personal to me, rather than attributes of a book itself; as my tastes might not match yours, and vice-versa.

On that basis the last time I was importing a small number of books and getting annoyed at having to manually reset all the imported ratings I decided to do something about it. I started hacking and put together a simple Calibre plugin to automatically zero ratings when books are imported to the collection (i.e. set the rating to be zero).

Sadly this work wasn't painless, despite the small size, as an unfortunate bug in Calibre meant my plugin method wasn't called. Happily Kovid Goyal helped me work through the problem, and he committed a fix that will be in the next Calibre release. For the moment I'm using today's git-snapshot and it works well.

Similarly I've recently started using extended file attributes to store metadata on my desktop system. Unfortunately the GNU findutils package doesn't allow you to do the obvious thing:

$ find ~/foo -xattr user.comment /home/skx/foo/bar/t.txt /home/skx/foo/bar/xc.txt /home/skx/foo/bar/x.txt

There are several xattr patches floating around, but I had to bundle my own in debian/patches to get support for finding files that have particular attribute names.

Maybe one day extended attributes will be taken seriously. (rsync, cp, etc will preserve them. I'm hazy on the compatibility with tar, but most things seem to be working.)

Categories: LUG Community Blogs