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Alan Pope: Awesome Community is Awesome

Mon, 09/03/2015 - 07:00

While flash sales, conferences and trade shows happen, the Community Core Apps project rolls forward landing updates and fixes to Ubuntu Phone applications. Some are default apps on the devices bq customers will soon receive, others are easily installable from the click store. All are maintained by a community of Free Software developers. I’m incredibly proud of the work these people are doing and wanted to highlight some recent updates.

As with all the applications below, if you’d like to get involved in design, documentation, testing, translation or just plain writing code either get in contact with me, or with any of the developers listed below. They’re all very nice people.

Weather Reboot

Andrew Hayzen, Victor Thompson and Nekhelesh Ramananthan got together to help Martin Borho reboot the Weather App with new designs created in collaboration with the Canonical Design Team. With a cleaner look, easier to use user interface, and fewer poke-your-eyes-out colour gradients, the new Weather app is coming along nicely!

Doc Viewer

Stefano Verzegnassi has been working hard on the usability and performance in the Doc Viewer. It now directly pulls documents from ~/Documents on the device and can receive files via Content-Hub such as those downloaded in the browser. Rendering performance has been improved, using multi-core page rendering to make use of the grunt in powerful phones. It’s also now possible to manage documents directly in the app, so you can delete files from ~/Documents with a long-press and some taps, no file manager required. There’s also a Table of Contents revealed from a bottom edge swipe, and a new document grid view.

While not currently a default app in devices, it’s in the store and works really well on all Ubuntu devices. Upcoming is a refinement of the full screen reading experience to remove the header and some improvements to document zooming. Longer term we’re also investigating and prototyping support for common office file formats.

Terminal

Filippo Scognamiglio recently updated the Terminal app to support configurable keyboard overlays. The overlay is a strip above the default OSK (on screen keyboard) which can be populated with keyboard shortcuts or full commands. These are designed to supplement the OSK and allow fast access to complex keyboard combinations or frequently typed commands. The Terminal app ships with a small number of sample keyboard overlays, but it’s easily user-expandable. Filippo blogged about it, read more there. If you create a cool overlay, do share it, and we may include it in a future update as a default. This update is in the store, available to install on Ubuntu devices.

Upcoming is a user interface change to easily switch on and off the keyboard overlays. So you may have 20 installed, but rarely use some, so can easily switch them off so they don’t clutter the main UI. In addition Filippo is working on breaking up the terminal app into a re-usable component to make it easy to ship click packages containing a command line tool and terminal together. So for example a developer could bundle mutt+terminal in a click package in the store. Clearly not a typical use case for many phone users, but it’ll certainly be useful for our early adopter hacker types

Calendar

Kunal Parmar has updated the Calendar app with some nice UI and performance improvements. If you sync events with the Calendar then they should show up quicker in the app than previously. He also implemented the ability to move events around the calendar with a long press and drag. More recently we’ve noticed a couple of crashers which we’re trying to get to the bottom of. Renato has a patch for EDS which seems promising! The latest Calendar update is in the store and available for testing as always.

Calculator Reboot

Riccardo Padovani and Bartosz Kosiorek have been completing work on the Calculator ‘reboot’. We received a new design a while back which has been almost completed. We have some more design changes to make, but we plan to release this version to the store shortly as the default Calculator. You can currently test it by installing “Calculator Reboot” from the click store on your Ubuntu device. Feedback (and bugs) welcome as always.

Reminders

Michael Zanetti and Riccardo Padovani have been really active with the Reminders app the last few weeks. Many bugs fixed, and a new offline mode for those that don’t want to connect to Evernote. There’s so many improvements which will require some additional QA before we upload to the store which should happen next week. This is a major update which has been a long time coming, and I’ll talk more about that in detail when it’s closer to landing.

Update: This update has landed in the store now!

Dekko

Dan Chapman and Boren Zhang have been implementing designs provided by the Canonical design team in their Dekko Email app. The changes are coming thick and fast, and if you’d like to test some of the new features, then install the “Dekko (beta)” app from the click store.

Clock

Nekhelesh Ramananthan pushed a small but important update to the Clock app recently which makes translatable the cities which are listed in the app. Once that landed we asked the Ubuntu translators if they could kindly translate the 200+ strings. Over night ~30 languages were done with more coming in over the weekend. It never ceases to amaze me how fast and attentive the Ubuntu translation communities are!

A massive thank you to all the developers, designers, testers and translators who have helped improve all of these apps. As always, get in touch if you’d like to get involved!

Categories: LUG Community Blogs

Steve Kemp: Free hosting, and key-signing

Fri, 06/03/2015 - 01:00

Over the past week I've mailed many of the people who had signed my previous GPG key and who had checked my ID as part of that process. My intention was to ask "Hey you trusted me before, would you sign my new key?".

So far no replies. I may have to be more dedicated and do the local-thing with people.

In other news Bytemark, who have previously donated a blade server, sponsored Debconf, and done other similar things, have now started offering free hosting to Debian-developers.

There is a list of such offers here:

I think that concludes this months blog-posting quota. Although who knows? I turn 39 in a couple of days, and that might allow me to make a new one.

Categories: LUG Community Blogs

Adam Trickett: DA.org: DKIM

Mon, 02/02/2015 - 21:55

Recently a friend asked me about SPF and DKIM. I was vaguely aware of them and their generally perceived uselessness. I've never bothered with them but thought I'd look into them for him. SPF was trivial to set up using my Bytemark DNS, and easy to testing using of many on-line email tools.

The challenge is DKIM, I found several sites that explained what to do - they were all variation around a theme and seemed easy enough. Generate a key pair (check), put the public half into your DNS (check), tweak Exim4 (ARGH!!!).

As far as I tell I followed what the web site said and reloaded the Exim config and it looks like it's all loaded into place, the key is readable by Exim, the path is correct but no matter what I do Exim wont add the DKIM signature to my outgoing emails...!

Tags: spf dkim

Categories: LUG Community Blogs

Philip Stubbs: Arduino and NRF24L01 for Quad-copter build

Thu, 29/01/2015 - 17:28
As part of my Quadcopter build, I am using a couple of Arduino's along with some cheap NRF24L01 from Banggood for the radio transmitter and reciever. The idea came from watching the YouTube channel iforce2d.

When I started developing (copying) the code for the NRF modules, I did a quick search for the required library. For no good reason, I opted for the RadioHead version. Part of my thinking was by using a different library from iforce2d, I would have to poke around in the code a bit more and lean something.

All went well with the initial trials. I managed to get the two modules talking to each other, and even had a simple processing script show the stick outputs by reading from the serial port of the receiver.

Things did not look so good when I plugged the flight controller in. For that I am using an Afro Mini32. With that connected to the computer and Baseflight running, the receiver tab showed a lot of fluctuations on the control signals.

Lots of poking , thinking, and even taking it into work to connect to an oscilloscope, it looked like the radio was mucking up with the timing of the PWM signal for the flight controller. Finally, I decided to give an alternative NRF library a try, and from the Arduino playground site, I selected this one. As per iforce2d, I think.

Well that fixed it. Although, at the same time I cleaned up my code and pulled lots debugging stuff out and changed one if loop to a while loop, so there is a chance that changing the Library was not the answer. Anyhow, it works well now. Just need some more bits to turn up and I can start on the actual copter!
Categories: LUG Community Blogs

Steve Kemp: Recording gym-visits on Linux.

Tue, 27/01/2015 - 01:00

I go to the gym every couple of days. I lift things up, then put them down, and sometimes I repeat this process another 30 times. When I'm done I write down what I've done, how many times I did the lifty-droppy thing, and so on.

I want to see pretty graphs. I want to have records of different things. I guess I just need some simple text-boxes:

deadlift 3 x 7 @ 210lbs.

etc. Sometimes I use machines so I'd say instead:

converging seated-row 3 x 8 @ 150lbs

Anyway that's it. I want a simple GUI, a bit like a spreadsheet where I can easily add rows of each session. (A session might have 10-15 exercises in it, so not many.) I imagine some kind of SQLite database for the back-end. Or CSV. Either works.

Writing GUI software is hard. I guess I should look at GtK or Qt over the next few days and see if it is going to be easier to do it online via a jQuery + CGI system instead. To be honest I expect doing it "online" is liable to be more popular, but I think a desktop toy-application is just as useful.

Categories: LUG Community Blogs

Adam Trickett: Picasa Web: 2015-01-24

Sun, 25/01/2015 - 00:22
Date: 24 Jan 2015
Number of Photos in Album: 1

View Album

Categories: LUG Community Blogs

Philip Stubbs: Quad-copter Build Log - Part 2

Mon, 19/01/2015 - 11:37
Working TransmitterAfter a bit of fiddling, the transmitter works. I have not tested it for range, other than making sure it works across the length of the house. At the moment it only has the standard NRF24L01 module. Although the high-power module has turned up, the antenna for it is still in transit.
As there is still no Quad copter to control, most of the testing has been done by watching numbers scroll up the screen from reading the serial output from the receiver. As this was getting painful, a simple processing script was written to display the control positions on the screen. 
Almost as soon as I started this, I wondered if it would be possible to get the processing script to pass the stick controls onto a flight simulator. A quick look at FlightGear turned into a quick flight around L.A. That is a project for another day.
Flight Control BoardA flight control board has been ordered. I decided on the AfroMini32. This has the usual accelerometers, gyroscopes and a barometer. It also uses a 32 bit micro controller so should be a capable piece of kit. Hopefully it will all come together by the summer.
Categories: LUG Community Blogs