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Steve Kemp: This blog has moved

Sun, 10/07/2016 - 19:30
This blog has moved to https://blog.steve.fi/. Please update to use the new feed location.
Categories: LUG Community Blogs

Debian Bits: New Debian Developers and Maintainers (May and June 2016)

Sun, 10/07/2016 - 16:30

The following contributors got their Debian Developer accounts in the last two months:

  • Josué Ortega (josue)
  • Mathias Behrle (mbehrle)
  • Sascha Steinbiss (satta)
  • Lucas Kanashiro (kanashiro)
  • Vasudev Sathish Kamath (vasudev)
  • Dima Kogan (dkogan)
  • Rafael Laboissière (rafael)
  • David Kalnischkies (donkult)
  • Marcin Kulisz (kula)
  • David Steele (steele
  • Herbert Parentes Fortes Neto (hpfn)
  • Ondřej Nový (onovy)
  • Donald Norwood (donald)
  • Neutron Soutmun (neutrons)
  • Steve Kemp (skx)

The following contributors were added as Debian Maintainers in the last two months:

  • Sean Whitton
  • Tiago Ilieve
  • Jean Baptiste Favre
  • Adrian Vondendriesch
  • Alkis Georgopoulos
  • Michael Hudson-Doyle
  • Roger Shimizu
  • SZ Lin
  • Leo Singer
  • Peter Colberg

Congratulations!

Categories: LUG Community Blogs

Steve Kemp: This blog has moved

Sat, 09/07/2016 - 19:30
This blog has moved to https://blog.steve.fi/. Please update to use the new feed location.
Categories: LUG Community Blogs

Steve Kemp: This blog has moved

Fri, 08/07/2016 - 19:30
This blog has moved to https://blog.steve.fi/. Please update to use the new feed location.
Categories: LUG Community Blogs

Steve Kemp: This blog has moved

Thu, 07/07/2016 - 19:30
This blog has moved to https://blog.steve.fi/ please update your subscription.
Categories: LUG Community Blogs

Debian Bits: Debian Perl Sprint 2016

Wed, 06/07/2016 - 22:45

Six members of the Debian Perl team met in Zurich over the weekend from May 19 to May 22 to continue the development around perl for Stretch and to work on QA across 3000+ packages.

The participants had a good time, met friends from local groups and even found some geocaches. Obviously, the sprint was productive this time too:

  • 36 bugs were filed or worked on, 28 uploads were accepted.
  • The plan to get Perl 5.24 transition into Stretch was confirmed, and a test rebuild server was set up.
  • Cross building XS modules was demoed, and the conditions where it is viable were discussed.
  • Several improvements were made in the team packaging tools, and new features were discussed and drafted.
  • A talk on downstream distribution aimed at CPAN authors was proposed for YAPC::EU 2016.

The full report was posted to the relevant Debian mailing lists.

The participants would like to thank the ETH Zurich for hosting us, and all donors to the Debian project who helped to cover a large part of our expenses.

Categories: LUG Community Blogs

Steve Kemp: This blog has moved

Wed, 06/07/2016 - 19:30
This blog has moved to https://blog.steve.fi/ please update your subscription.
Categories: LUG Community Blogs

Steve Kemp: So I've been busy.

Thu, 30/06/2016 - 07:52

The past few days I've been working on my mail client which has resulted in a lot of improvements to drawing, display and correctness.

Since then I've been working on adding GPG-support. My naive attempt was to extract the signature, and the appropriate body-part from the message. Write them both to disk then I could validate via:

gpg --verify msg.sig msg

However that failed, and it took me a long to work out why. I downloaded the source to mutt, which can correctly verify an attached-signature, then hacked lib.c to neuter the mutt_unlink function. That left me with a bunch of files inside $TEMPFILE one of which provided the epiphany.

A message which is to be validated is indeed written out to disk, just as I would have done, as is the signature. Ignoring the signature the message is interesting:

Content-Type: text/plain; charset=UTF-8 Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable On Mon, 27 Jun 2016 08:08:14 +0200 ... --=20 Bob Smith

The reason I'd failed to validate my message-body was because I'd already decoded the text of the MIME-part, and I'd also lost the prefixed two lines "Content-type:.." and Content-Transfer:.... I'm currently trying to work out if it is possible to get access to the RAW MIME-part-text in GMIME.

Anyway that learning aside I've made a sleazy hack which just shells out to mimegpg, and this allows me to validate GPG signatures! That's not the solution I'd prefer, but that said it does work, and it works with inline-signed messages as well as messages with application/pgp-signature MIME-parts.

Changing the subject now. I wonder how many people read to the end anyway?

I've been in Finland for almost a year now. Recently I was looking over websites and I saw that the domain steve.fi was going to expire in a few weeks. So I started obsessively watching it. Today I claimed it.

So I'll be slowly moving things from beneath steve.org.uk to use the new home steve.fi.

I also setup a mini-portfolio/reference site at http://steve.kemp.fi/ - which was a domain I registered while I was unsure if I could get steve.fi.

Finally now is a good time to share more interesting news:

  • I've been reinstated as a Debian developer.
  • We're having a baby.
    • Interesting times.
Categories: LUG Community Blogs

Steve Kemp: So I've been busy.

Thu, 30/06/2016 - 07:52

The past few days I've been working on my mail client which has resulted in a lot of improvements to drawing, display and correctness.

Since then I've been working on adding GPG-support. My naive attempt was to extract the signature, and the appropriate body-part from the message. Write them both to disk then I could validate via:

gpg --verify msg.sig msg

However that failed, and it took me a long to work out why. I downloaded the source to mutt, which can correctly verify an attached-signature, then hacked lib.c to neuter the mutt_unlink function. That left me with a bunch of files inside $TEMPFILE one of which provided the epiphany.

A message which is to be validated is indeed written out to disk, just as I would have done, as is the signature. Ignoring the signature the message is interesting:

Content-Type: text/plain; charset=UTF-8 Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable On Mon, 27 Jun 2016 08:08:14 +0200 ... --=20 Bob Smith

The reason I'd failed to validate my message-body was because I'd already decoded the text of the MIME-part, and I'd also lost the prefixed two lines "Content-type:.." and Content-Transfer:.... I'm currently trying to work out if it is possible to get access to the RAW MIME-part-text in GMIME.

Anyway that learning aside I've made a sleazy hack which just shells out to mimegpg, and this allows me to validate GPG signatures! That's not the solution I'd prefer, but that said it does work, and it works with inline-signed messages as well as messages with application/pgp-signature MIME-parts.

Changing the subject now. I wonder how many people read to the end anyway?

I've been in Finland for almost a year now. Recently I was looking over websites and I saw that the domain steve.fi was going to expire in a few weeks. So I started obsessively watching it. Today I claimed it.

So I'll be slowly moving things from beneath steve.org.uk to use the new home steve.fi.

I also setup a mini-portfolio/reference site at http://steve.kemp.fi/ - which was a domain I registered while I was unsure if I could get steve.fi.

Finally now is a good time to share more interesting news:

  • I've been reinstated as a Debian developer.
  • We're having a baby.
    • Interesting times.
Categories: LUG Community Blogs

Debian Bits: DebConf16 schedule available

Mon, 27/06/2016 - 08:00

DebConf16 will be held this and next week in Cape Town, South Africa, and we're happy to announce that the schedule is already available. Of course, it is still possible for some minor changes to happen!

The DebCamp Sprints already started on 23 June 2016.

DebConf will open on Saturday, 2 July 2016 with the Open Festival, where events of interest to a wider audience are offered, ranging from topics specific to Debian to a wider appreciation of the open and maker movements (and not just IT-related). Hackers, makers, hobbyists and other interested parties are invited to share their activities with DebConf attendees and the public at the University of Cape Town, whether in form of workshops, lightning talks, install parties, art exhibition or posters. Additionally, a Job Fair will take place on Saturday, and its job wall will be available throughout DebConf.

The full schedule of the Debian Conference thorough the week is published. After the Open Festival, the conference will continue with more than 85 talks and BoFs (informal gatherings and discussions within Debian teams), including not only software development and packaging but also areas like translation, documentation, artwork, testing, specialized derivatives, maintenance of the community infrastructure, and other.

There will also be also a plethora of social events, such as our traditional cheese and wine party, our group photo and our day trip.

DebConf talks will be broadcast live on the Internet when possible, and videos of the talks will be published on the web along with the presentation slides.

DebConf is committed to a safe and welcome environment for all participants. See the DebConf Code of Conduct and the Debian Code of Conduct for more details on this.

Debian thanks the commitment of numerous sponsors to support DebConf16, particularly our Platinum Sponsor Hewlett Packard Enterprise.

About Hewlett Packard Enterprise

Hewlett Packard Enterprise actively participates in open source. Thousands of developers across the company are focused on open source projects, and HPE sponsors and supports the open source community in a number of ways, including: contributing code, sponsoring foundations and projects, providing active leadership, and participating in various committees.

Categories: LUG Community Blogs

Steve Kemp: So I should document the purple server a little more

Wed, 15/06/2016 - 17:32

I should probably document the purple server I hacked together in Perl and mentioned in my last post. In short it allows you to centralise notifications. Send "alerts" to it, and when they are triggered they will be routed from that central location. There is only a primitive notifier included, which sends data to the console, but there are sample stubs for sending by email/pushover, and escalation.

In brief you create alerts by sending a JSON object via HTTP-POST. These objects contain a bunch of fields, but the two most important are:

  • id
    • A human-name for the alert. e.g. "disk-space", "heartbeat", or "unread-mail".
  • raise
    • When to raise the alert. e.g. "now", "+5m", "1466006086".

When an update is received any existing alert has its values updated, which makes heartbeat alerts trivial. Send a message with:

{ "id": "heartbeat", "raise": "+5m", .. }

The existing alert will be updated each time such a new event is submitted, which means that the time at which that alert will raise will be pushed back by five minutes. If you send this every 60 seconds then you'll get informed of an outage five minutes after your server explodes (because the "+5m" will have been turned into an absolute time, and that time will eventually become in the past - triggering a notification).

Alerts are keyed on the source IP which sent the submission and the id field, meaning you can send the same update from multiple hosts without causing any problems.

Notifications can be viewed in a reasonably pretty Web UI, so you can clear raised-alerts, see the pending ones, and suppress further notifications on something that has been raised. (By default notifications are issued every sixty seconds, until the alert is cleared. There is support for only raising an alert once, which is useful for services you might deliver events via, such as pushover which will repeat themselves.)

Anyway this is a fun project, which is a significantly simplified and less scalable version of a project which is open-sourced already and used at Bytemark.

Categories: LUG Community Blogs