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Martin A. Brooks: Buying a custom gaming PC from Overclockers UK

Mon, 14/04/2014 - 17:25

My current workstation and gaming PC is slowly disintegrating. I built it myself from components some 6 years ago and it’s simply wearing out.  Several USB ports don’t work and Windows sometimes bluescreens with errors that suggests bits of the motherboard are getting tired.  I don’t really have the spare time needed to build a high-end PC and make a great job of it, so I decided to treat myself to a pre-built custom system.   After hunting round, I settled on Overclockers as the company to buy from.

Their system configurator didn’t quite give me what I wanted, so I contacted them and asked if they could customise further which they could.   I put together my list of requirements, they send back a price.  I paid, cash wired to their bank account, upfront and sat back and waited for my new shiny liquid-cooled PC to arrive.

The system shipped.  It shipped to the wrong address.  I had provided Overclockers with a billing address and a shipping address.  They shipped to the billing address which is almost guaranteed to be unoccupied during regular working hours.

A simple mistake.  It happens.  I contacted the courier who were unable to redeliver again that day, but promised they would deliver it to the shipping address the next day.

Next day, my new shiny PC arrives.  I opened the smaller of the two boxes, one for spare components and so on, and immediately see a problem.  The spares and cables and whatnots are not branded with anything I specified, wrong motherboard and wrong graphics card.  I call Overclockers who suggest that the component boxes may have been mixed up and can I please open the main box and check. I do.  It’s someone else’s computer.  I later learn that my system has been shipped to somewhere else.  Overclockers’ mistake?  Courier’s mistake?  It doesn’t really matter. Overclockers have a courier come and pick up this system.

Meanwhile, my system makes its merry way back to Overclockers’ HQ and I, confusingly, get an email asking what I’d like done with it.   I suggest shipping it to the shipping address and could I please have an AM delivery so I don’t potentially waste a whole day.  I offered to pay for whatever that was going to cost.  Overclockers said it was no problem.  Super.

My PC finally showed up at Friday 8pm.   The more astute amongst you will spot that 8pm is not exactly an AM delivery.  Overclockers’ mistake?  Courier’s mistake?  I have no idea, the question has not yet been answered.

I unpack my new PC.  The first thing I notice is that there is a bolt rolling around in the bottom of it.  Stuff can come loose in shipping, so what.  I find that the bolt belongs to a radiator housing in the bottom of the case, there’s a hole, a loose radiator and tool marks around the hole.  Not ideal, but the system’s not going to be moved around much so no big problem.  Despite being an SLI system, there was no SLI cable installed linking the graphics cards.  Simple to fix, but a silly thing for an expert system builder to miss.

One of the customised things I asked for was the pre-cabling of some SATA drives bays: one for a blu-ray writer and two for a pair of big SATA disks I use for bulk local storage.   None of these were done.   I call Overclockers about this, and the loose bolt, and they say there’s not much that can be done without returning the system to them.  As I’ve no interest in another game of couriers, I grumble a bit but then do the cabling myself.

Over the next day or so I had almost no chance to really push the new system.  It ticked over happily, was lovely and quiet and lovely to look at too.  On Sunday night, though, the headphones went on, the office door was closed and I got on with a bit of GRID 2, with all the visual effects turned up to maximum.  I settled down for a couple of hours of hard racing.   After about an hour, the screen froze, went black, and all the system fans kicked into life.

I powered off, reached for my mini-torch and opened the case.  What I saw sickened me: liquid coolant leaking from the CPU block, down onto a graphics card and spilling on to the motherboard.  It was impossible to tell whether the CPU had simply thermally shut down or if the coolant had shorted something expensive.  It kind of didn’t matter.

The next morning I called Overclockers who arranged to pick the system up.  I asked if they could sort of the cabling and the loose bolts while they were at it.  They agreed.

A couple of days later, I got an email saying the system had been repaired and was on its way back to me.  The next evening I get a call from the owner of the billing address saying that a courier had tried to deliver something with my name on it.   They had shipped to the wrong address. Again.

I had now run out of patience and I asked for a full refund.   To their credit, Overclockers didn’t argue on this and they said one would be arranged.  As it was convenient for me, I asked to keep the Windows 8.1 licence and the SSD.   As it was convenient for them, I agreed to pay for these again separately, they would then issue a refund for the full amount of the original transaction.  I didn’t ask, but I kind of expected they would simply wire the cash back to my bank account.

After 3 days or so, nothing had showed up, so I called and they said that processing a refund might take up to 7 working days.

Today, 10 days on, nothing had showed up, so I called them and they said a cheque had been issued on the 4th and had been sent to……. you guessed it, the wrong address.  The owner of the address had not had a cheque arrive.

They offered to send a new cheque to the right address.  I suggested they simply wire the money to my account, I was told this was impossible due to the people who would have to do that being in Germany.  No, makes no sense to me either.  I asked if the cheque could be sent by special delivery, for which I was happy to cover the costs.   This was, of course, not possible.

So, 5 weeks after placing a cash order for a high-spec custom PC from Overclockers UK, I have no PC and they have a large amount of my money.

Please consider this post next time you’re thinking of ordering from them.

 

(Update: 15/4/2014:  A handwritten cheque arrived from Overclockers this morning. )

Categories: LUG Community Blogs

Debian Bits: DPL election is over, Lucas Nussbaum re-elected

Mon, 14/04/2014 - 07:10

The Debian Project Leader election has concluded and the winner is Lucas Nussbaum. Of a total of 1003 developers, 401 developers voted using the Condorcet method.

More information about the result is available in the Debian Project Leader Elections 2014 page.

The new term for the project leader will start on April 17th and expire on April 17th 2015.

Categories: LUG Community Blogs

Steve Kemp: Putting the finishing touches to a nodejs library

Fri, 11/04/2014 - 15:14

For the past few years I've been running a simple service to block blog/comment-spam, which is (currently) implemented as a simple JSON API over HTTP, with a minimal core and all the logic in a series of plugins.

One obvious thing I wasn't doing until today was paying attention to the anchor-text used in hyperlinks, for example:

<a href="http://fdsf.example.com/">buy viagra</a>

Blocking on the anchor-text is less prone to false positives than blocking on keywords in the comment/message bodies.

Unfortunately there seem to exist no simple nodejs modules for extracting all the links, and associated anchors, from a random Javascript string. So I had to write such a module, but .. given how small it is there seems little point in sharing it. So I guess this is one of the reasons why there often large gaps in the module ecosystem.

(Equally some modules are essentially applications; great that the authors shared, but virtually unusable, unless you 100% match their problem domain.)

I've written about this before when I had to construct, and publish, my own cidr-matching module.

Anyway expect an upload soon, currently I "parse" HTML and BBCode. Possibly markdown to follow, since I have an interest in markdown.

Categories: LUG Community Blogs

Steve Kemp: A small assortment of content

Thu, 10/04/2014 - 16:34

Today I took down my KVM-host machine, rebooting it and restarting all of my guests. It has been a while since I'd done so and I was a little nerveous, as it turned out this nerveousness was prophetic.

I'd forgotten to hardwire the use of proxy_arp so my guests were all broken when the systems came back online.

If you're curious this is what my incoming graph of email SPAM looks like:

I think it is obvious where the downtime occurred, right?

In other news I'm awaiting news from the system administration job I applied for here in Edinburgh, if that doesn't work out I'll need to hunt for another position..

Finally I've started hacking on my console based mail-client some more. It is a modal client which means you're always in one of three states/modes:

  • maildir - Viewing a list of maildir folders.
  • index - Viewing a list of messages.
  • message - Viewing a single message.

As a result of a lot of hacking there is now a fourth mode/state "text-mode". Which allows you to view arbitrary text, for example scrolling up and down a file on-disk, to read the manual, or viewing messages in interesting ways.

Support is still basic at the moment, but both of these work:

-- -- Show a single file -- show_file_contents( "/etc/passwd" ) global_mode( "text" )

Or:

function x() txt = { "${colour:red}Steve", "${colour:blue}Kemp", "${bold}Has", "${underline}Definitely", "Made this work" } show_text( txt ) global_mode( "text") end x()

There will be a new release within the week, I guess, I just need to wire up a few more primitives, write more of a manual, and close some more bugs.

Happy Thursday, or as we say in this house, Hyvää torstai!

Categories: LUG Community Blogs

Steve Kemp: So that distribution I'm not-building?

Sun, 06/04/2014 - 15:35

The other week I was toying with using GNU stow to build an NFS-share, which would allow remote machines to boot from it.

It worked. It worked well. (Standard stuff, PXE booting with an NFS-root.)

Then I started wondering about distributions, since in one sense what I'd built was a minimal distribution.

On that basis yesterday I started hacking something more minimal:

  • I compiled a monolithic GNU/Linux kernel.
  • I created a minimal initrd image, using busybox.
  • I built a static version of the tcc compiler.
  • I got the thing booting, via KVM.

Unfortunately here is where I ran out of patience. Using tcc and the static C library I can compile code. But I can't link it.

$ cat > t.c <>EOF int main ( int argc, char *argv[] ) { printf("OK\n" ); return 1; } EOF $ /opt/tcc/bin/tcc t.c tcc: error: file 'crt1.o' not found tcc: error: file 'crti.o' not found ..

Attempting to fix this up resulted in nothing much better:

$ /opt/tcc/bin/tcc t.c -I/opt/musl/include -L/opt/musl/lib/

And because I don't have a full system I cannot compile t.c to t.o and use ld to link (because I have no ld.)

I had a brief flirt with the portable c-compiler, pcc, but didn't get any further with that.

I suspect the real solution here is to install gcc onto my host system, with something like --prefix=/opt/gcc, and then rsync that into my (suddenly huge) intramfs image. Then I have all the toys.

Categories: LUG Community Blogs