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MJ Ray: Three systems

Tue, 22/07/2014 - 03:59

There are three basic systems:

The first is slick and easy to use, but fiddly to set up correctly and if you want to do something that its makers don’t want you to, it’s rather difficult. If it breaks, then fixing it is also fiddly, if not impossible and requiring complete reinitialisation.

The second system is an older approach, tried and tested, but fell out of fashion with the rise of the first and very rarely comes preinstalled on new machines. Many recent installations can be switched to and from the first system at the flick of a switch if wanted. It needs a bit more thought to operate but not much and it’s still pretty obvious and intuitive. You can do all sorts of customisations and it’s usually safe to mix and match parts. It’s debatable whether it is more efficient than the first or not.

The third system is a similar approach to the other two, but simplified in some ways and all the ugly parts are hidden away inside neat packaging. These days you can maintain and customise it yourself without much more difficulty than the other systems, but the basic hardware still attracts a price premium. In theory, it’s less efficient than the other types, but in practice it’s easier to maintain so doesn’t lose much efficiency. Some support companies for the other types won’t touch it while others will only work with it.

So that’s the three types of bicycle gears: indexed, friction and hub. What did you think it was?

Categories: LUG Community Blogs

Chris Lamb: Disabling internet for specific processes with libfiu

Mon, 21/07/2014 - 18:26

My primary usecase is to prevent testsuites and build systems from contacting internet-based services. This, at the very least, introduces an element of non-determinism and malicious code at worst.

I use Alberto Bertogli's libfiu for this, specifically the fiu-run utility which part of the fiu-utils package on Debian and Ubuntu.

Here's a contrived example, where I prevent Curl from talking to the internet:

$ fiu-run -x -c 'enable name=posix/io/net/connect' curl google.com curl: (6) Couldn't resolve host 'google.com'

... and here's an example of it detecting two possibly internet-connecting tests:

$ fiu-run -x -c 'enable name=posix/io/net/connect' ./manage.py text [..] ---------------------------------------------------------------------- Ran 892 tests in 2.495s FAILED (errors=2) Destroying test database for alias 'default'...

Note that libfiu inherits all the drawbacks of LD_PRELOAD; in particular, we cannot limit the child process that calls setuid binaries such as /bin/ping:

$ fiu-run -x -c 'enable name=posix/io/net/connect' ping google.com PING google.com (173.194.41.65) 56(84) bytes of data. 64 bytes from lhr08s01.1e100.net (17.194.41.65): icmp_req=1 ttl=57 time=21.7 ms 64 bytes from lhr08s01.1e100.net (17.194.41.65): icmp_req=2 ttl=57 time=18.9 ms [..]

Whilst it would certainly be more robust and flexible to use iptables—such as allowing localhost and other local socket connections but disabling all others—I gravitate towards this entirely userspace solution as it requires no setup and I can quickly modify it to block other calls on an ad-hoc basis. The list of other "modules" libfiu supports is viewable here.

Categories: LUG Community Blogs

Mick Morgan: drip

Mon, 21/07/2014 - 15:23

I get my domestic ADSL connectivity from the rather excellent people at Andrews and Arnold.

Here’s why. And this is the original reason I moved to them.

They also happily take (and similarly reply to) GPG encrypted support questions.

Good guys. Thoroughly recommended.

Now can you /really/ see BT doing any of that?

‘thought not.

Categories: LUG Community Blogs

Jonathan McDowell: On the state of Free VoIP

Thu, 17/07/2014 - 22:08

Every now and then I decide I'll try and sort out my VoIP setup. And then I give up. Today I tried again. I really didn't think I was aiming that high. I thought I'd start by making my email address work as a SIP address. Seems reasonable, right? I threw in the extra constraints of wanting some security (so TLS, not UDP) and a soft client that would work on my laptop (I have a Grandstream hardphone and would like an Android client as well, but I figure those are the easy cases while the "I have my laptop and I want to remain connected" case is a bit trickier). I had a suitable Internet connected VM, access to control my DNS fully (so I can do SRV records) and time to read whatever HOWTOs required. And oh my ghod the state of the art is appalling.

Let's start with getting a SIP server up and running. I went with repro which seemed to be a reasonably well recommended SIP server to register against. And mostly getting it up and running and registering against it is fine. Until you try and make a TLS SIP call through it (to a sip5060.net test address). Problem the first; the StartCom free SSL certs are not suitable because they don't advertise TLS Client. So I switch to CACert. And then I get bitten by the whole question about whether the common name on the cert should be the server name, or the domain name on the SIP address (it's the domain name on the SIP address apparently, though that might make your SIP client complain).

That gets the SIP side working. Of course RTP is harder. repro looks like it's doing the right thing. The audio never happens. I capitulate at this point, and install Lumicall on my phone. That registers correctly and I can call the sip:test.time@sip5060.net test number and hear the time. So the server is functioning, it's the client that's a problem. I try the following (Debian/testing):

  • jitsi - Registers fine, seems to lack any sort of TURN/STUN support.
  • ekiga - No sign of TLS registration support.
  • twinkle - Not in testing. A recompile leads to no sign of an actual client starting up when executed.
  • sflphone - Fails to start (Debian bug #745695).
  • Empathy - Fails to connect. Doesn't show any useful debug.
  • linphone - No TLS connect (Debian bug #743494).

I'm bored at this point. Can I "dial" my debian.org SIP address from Lumicall? Of course not; I get a "Codecs incompatible" (SIP 488 Not Acceptable Here) response. I have no idea what that means. I seem to have all of the options on Lumicall enabled. Is it a NAT thing? A codec thing? Did I sacrifice the wrong colour of goat?

At some point during this process I get a Skype call from some friends, which I answer. Up comes a video call with them, their newborn, perfect audio, and no hassle. I have a conversation with them that doesn't involve me cursing technology at all. And then I go back to fighting with SIP.

Gunnar makes the comment about Skype creating a VoIP solution 10 years ago when none was to be found. I believe they're still the market leader. It just works. I'm running the Linux client, and they're maintaining it (a little behind the curve, but close enough), and it works for text chat, voice chat and video calls. I've spent half a day trying to get a Free equivalent working and failing. I need something that works behind NAT, because it's highly likely when I'm on the move that's going to be the case. I want something that lets my laptop be the client, because I don't want to rely on my mobile phone. I want my email address to also be my VoIP address. I want some security (hell, I'm not even insisting on SRTP, though I'd like to). And the state of the Open VoIP stack just continues to make me embarrassed.

I haven't given up yet, but I'd appreciate some pointers. And Skype, if you're hiring, drop me a line. ;)

Categories: LUG Community Blogs

Steve Engledow (stilvoid): Quayside

Mon, 14/07/2014 - 22:22

Docker is the new best thing ever.

The technology behind it is pretty cool. It works very well and it's incredibly easy to just make things work.

But that's not the best bit!

My favourite thing about Docker is that it's simple to explain to semi-technical folks and better yet, it's easy to get people enthusiastic about it.

As I've previously mentioned, simplicity is something I aspire to in all things and the fact that "post-technical" [cheers Goran ;)] types get excited about how Docker can be used to break your services down into small components that you thread together makes my life that much easier when I'm trying to "sell" the benefits of doing so.

I have failed at sentence construction. Maybe I need to dockerise [eww] that.

Categories: LUG Community Blogs