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Dick Turpin: White space.

Planet WolvesLUG - Wed, 12/02/2014 - 17:00
Customer: "The download URL generated by our website is not working."
Me: "TBH it has never worked."
Customer: "Yes it has!"
Me: "OK, see the plus signs in this+is+my+file.pdf that is not a legal character in a URL it should be %20"
Customer: "OK?"
Me: "I've turned on directory listing on on your website. Can you see all the documents now?"
Customer: "Oh yeah."
Me: "So you would have got myfile.pdf but not my file.pdf you would have got anotherfile.pdf but not yet another file.pdf"
Customer: "Oh, that explains why sometimes it worked and sometimes it didn't."

#facepalm
Categories: LUG Community Blogs

Jonathan McDowell: Choosing a new laptop

Planet ALUG - Tue, 11/02/2014 - 23:31

Recently I've been thinking about getting a new laptop. I have this rule that a laptop should last me at least 3 years (ideally more) and my old laptop was bought in September 2010. So for the past few months I've been trying to work out if there's something suitable on the market that is a good replacement (last time I didn't manage to find something that ticked all the boxes, but did pretty well for the price I paid).

To start with I decided to track my laptops over time - largely because one of my concerns was about the size of a replacement, because I have a significant leaning towards subnotebooks. In the end the reason I decided to upgrade was for some extra CPU grunt; my old machine had a tendency to get pretty hot under any sort of load.

DateModelCPUScreenRAMStorageW (mm)H (mm)D (mm)WeightCost 1991Amstrad PPC 640DNEC V30 8MHz9" 640x200 non-backlit green LCD640k2 x 3.5" FDD45023010010kg??? August 1997Compaq Aero 4/33c486sx337.8" 640x480 CSTN LCD4MB80MB260190431.6kg??? July 2002Compaq Evo N200P-III 700MHz10.4" 1024x768 TFT192MB20GB251198201.1kg£939.99 August 2005Toshiba Portege R200Pentium M 753 1.2GHz12.1" 1024x768 TFT1280MB60GB286229201.29kg£1313.58 September 2008Asus EEE 901Atom N270 1.6GHz8.9" 1024x600 TFT2GB4GB + 16GB SSD248175231.1kg£299.99 September 2010Acer Aspire 1830TCore-i5 470UM 1.33GHz11.6" 1366x768 TFT8GB500GB284203281.4kg$699.99 (~ £480)

The EEE didn't actually replace the Toshiba, but I mention it for completeness. It was actually the only machine I moved to the US with, but after about a month of it as my primary machine I realized it wasn't an option for day to day use - though it was fantastic as a machine to throw in an overnight bag, especially when coupled with a 3G dongle.

I wasn't keen on significantly increasing the size of my laptop. There are a number of decent 13" Ultrabook options out there, and I looked at a few of them, but nothing grabbed me as being worth the increase in size. Also I wanted something better than the Acer - one of the major problems was finding something smaller than 13" that had 8G RAM, let alone more. There's a significant trend towards everything soldered in for the smaller/slimmer notebooks, which makes some sense but means that the base spec had better be right.

Much to my surprise the Microsoft Surface Pro 2 looked like an option. It comes with an i5-4300U processor (at least since around Christmas 2013), and the 256/512G SSD models have 8G RAM. Screen resolution is an attractive true HD (1920x1080) and the 10" display means it's smaller than the Aspire. Unfortunately the keyboard lets it down. It's fine given a flat surface, but not great if you want to support the whole thing on your lap. Which is something I tend to do with my laptop, whether that's on the sofa, or in bed, or on a bus/train.

Another option was the Sony Vaio Pro 11. This is a pretty sweet laptop (I managed to get to play with one at a Sony store in the US). Super slim and light. 8GB RAM. True HD screen. However I have bad memories of the build quality of the older Vaios and the fact that there was /no/ user replaceable parts put me off - it's a safe bet that a laptop battery is going to need replaced in a 3 year lifespan.

What I managed to find, and purchase, was a Dell Latitude E7240. I admit that the Dell brand made me wary - while I've not had any issue with their desktops I didn't associated their laptops as being particularly high quality. Mind you, I could say the same for Acer and I've been very pleased with the Aspire (if they'd had a more up to date model I'd have bought it). I bought the E7240 with the Core-i5 4300U (so the same as the Surface Pro 2) and True HD touch screen. It has a replaceable battery, expandable RAM (up to 16G) and the storage is an mSATA SSD. It also came with a built in 3G card. At 12.5" it's a little bigger than my old machine, but I decided that was a reasonable idea given the higher resolution. I'm typing this article on it now, having finally completed the setup and migration of the data from the old laptop to it this evening. More details once I've been using it for a little bit I think.

Categories: LUG Community Blogs

Wayne Stallwood (DrJeep): AWS EC2 Tricks

Planet ALUG - Tue, 11/02/2014 - 22:14
Storage

PIOS are expensive but EBS optimisation isn't. If your application is storage bound then setting the “EBS optimised” flag should always be your first step to improving performance.

The benefit is actually two-fold, setting this option essentially adds a dedicated network link for the EBS volumes. So as well as improving data throughput for your storage it also stops it competing with regular network traffic so your overall network performance improves as well.

Instance sizing

Firstly, if you are on first generation instance types such as M1 and C1 then you need to check out the newer generation machines now. In almost all cases the M1 and C1 instances have a direct replacement in M3 or C3 which will almost certainly be better value in terms of price

performance.

ECU's I used to assume had a bit of marketing adjustment. The truth is that in my testing and on CPU bound workloads I find they are pretty spot on (twice the ECU's really does tend to give you twice the performance)

As with hardware sizing generally, look at your workload and choose appropriate instance classes. Don't just default to the general purpose classes.

Reserved Instances

I'd recommend against 3 year reservations. You can't take advantage of new instance classes unless you manage to sell your old reservations (not so easy on the older generations) also discounts on reservations when AWS drop EC2 prices are entirely at Amazon's discretion. 3 years is way too long to be contracted in to a current instance class at current pricing.

I'd also think very carefully before reserving at Heavy Utilisation. It's not that much cheaper than Medium, the upfront cost is higher and you are billed the hourly rate whether you are using it or not. If you lose funding for your environment then you can't escape the costs until your reservation contract is up.

EBS

Volumes are thin provisioned. So new writes to previously unused space tend to be very slow. If you have the time, pre-fill your volumes for maximum performance in production.

Snapshots may be inconsistent if there are writes to the volume in the the initial pending phase. Avoid writes for the first 10 minutes of requesting a snap. Snapshots of Raided volumes however will most likely be inconsistent unless the instance is stopped for the duration of the snap.

PIOPS (Provisioned IO) can “currently” only be changed when provisioning the volume.

Work hard to optimise IO in your application and then use cloudwatch or on OS tools to determine what you really need before reserving IO. Tricks such as aligning block sizes to access (MS-SQL) can pay dividends, though be aware that PIOPS count for block sizes not larger than 16KB. So optimising above that has limited benefit because accessing a 64KB block will occupy 4 PIOPS.

Categories: LUG Community Blogs

Mick Morgan: privacy matters

Planet ALUG - Tue, 11/02/2014 - 17:54

The Open Rights Group here in the UK has been campaigning against mass, umwarranted surveillance by GCHQ since the Snowden revelations first emerged in summer of last year. Two of its current campaigns are: “don’t spy on us” and “the day we fight back“.

I have signed both of them.

I have also written to my MP in the following terms:

I have today signed the on-line petition for the “don’t spy on us” campaign. That campaign calls for an inquiry into the mass, unwarranted, surveillance of the UK population by GCHQ.

I call upon you, as my elected representative, to support my rights under Article 8 and 10 of the European Convention on Human Rights to a private life with full, unfettered freedom of expression.

I ask that you support the campaign both on-line, and in Parliament. Parliament has been completely ineffective in its oversight of GCHQ. That must end. You, along with all other Parliamentarians must do a much better job of holding them to account.

Yours sincerely

Mick Morgan

I’ll let you know what he says (though I can guess the reply. In fact I could probably write it myself.)

Categories: LUG Community Blogs

Dick Turpin: Not new?

Planet WolvesLUG - Tue, 11/02/2014 - 17:08
So I was offering some generation 1 iPads for sale.

Prospect: "Ello mate, you've got some iPad's for sale, what does iPad 1 mean?"
Me: "It means they are first generation, the first iPad's they made."
Prospect: "Oh, so they're old then?
Me: "Well as I say they are the first ones released."
Prospect: "They're not the latest ones then?"
Me: "Not for £150 they're not!"

If only I had more hair to pull out.
Categories: LUG Community Blogs

Dick Turpin: Anything cheaper?

Planet WolvesLUG - Tue, 11/02/2014 - 14:25
I'm sorry but you've really fecked me off! You time waster.

*Day 1*  "Thanks for the email on the refurbed base unit for £200 leave it with me."

*Day 2* "These refubed ipads for £150 do you have them? Oh, you order them in. Let me think about it."

*Day 3* "How much for a Samsung 10.1?"

Why do I say time waster? £200 is clearly too much for him, £150 was probably too much for him and now he's taking the piss by asking about something that is clearly double the price of second hand equipment.
Categories: LUG Community Blogs

Aq: Building a (PhoneGap) iOS app from Ubuntu entirely without Mac OS X

Planet WolvesLUG - Tue, 11/02/2014 - 12:11

The Major: But, Fawlty, how did the starling get in the bar?
Basil: No, no, no. You were in the bar.
The Major: I was in the bar? Yes! Yes, I was!
Basil: And the starling was in the garden, and the rat was nowhere at all.

It is possible, with the aid of PhoneGap and Adobe’s PhoneGap Build service, to make an app for iOS, get it signed, and deploy it to an iPhone without having a Mac involved at all. Up until yesterday I would have sworn up and down that this was not possible, and I told a bunch of people that; making a PhoneGap app isn’t a problem from Ubuntu, but getting the necessary keys to get it signed is. However, thanks to a writeup from BreezeJS I now know that this is not the truth. It’s possible to make an iOS app in Ubuntu and get it signed, I’ve done it, and now I’ll walk through that process. This description owes a lot to the Breeze writeup without which I’d be nowhere, but exactly what the screens look like has changed a little. Links and instructions correct as of 11th February 2014.

Make a PhoneGap app

No instructions for this bit. Read the PhoneGap documentation. Once you’ve built that, you’ll have a www/ folder with the HTML, CSS, and JavaScript of your app in it.

Get a PhoneGap Build account and add your app

Also no instructions for this bit, other than to say this: the app bundle that you upload or pull from Github does not have to contain just the contents of your www folder. I pointed PGB at a Github repos which had the www/ folder at top level and other things in the repos too, and it worked fine. Remember that your config.xml file which configures PGB needs to be in the same folder as index.html.

Get an iOS developer account

Sign up for the Apple Developer Programme. To build iOS apps this will cost you sixty quid. Once you get an email saying that you have access to iTunes Connect, you’ve been approved. Do what it tells you and fill out a bunch of forms about your bank account and address and so on.

Set up certificates

Go to the Apple Developer Member Centre and choose Certificates, Identifiers & Profiles, then under iOS Apps choose Certificates. You’ll probably see a screen saying “What type of certificate do you need?”; if you don’t, there’s a [+] button to add a new certificate.

The first thing you need is the Apple intermediate signing certificate, available from this screen. At the bottom it says Worldwide Developer Relations Certificate Authority; download this AppleWWDRCA.cer file and keep it around somewhere.

Development p12 key

Now, set yourself up a development p12 key as follows.

# Generate your private key openssl genrsa -out private.key 2048 # Generate a certificate signing request. Use your own email address! openssl req -new -key private.key -out CertificateSigningRequest.certSigningRequest -subj '/emailAddress=joe@example.com, CN=Joe Example, C=UK'

On the “What type of certificate do you need?” Apple page, say “iOS App Development”. Go through its little wizard and upload your CertificateSigningRequest.certSigningRequest file. It will give you back a ios_development.cer file.

# Convert ios_development.cer to ios_development.pem openssl x509 -in ios_development.cer -inform DER -out ios_development.pem -outform PEM # Convert ios_development.pem to ios_development.p12. Enter a password and remember it for later. openssl pkcs12 -export -inkey private.key -in ios_development.pem -out ios_development.p12 Distribution p12 key

Now, generate a distribution p12 key in the same way:

# Generate a certificate signing request. Use your own email address! openssl req -new -key private.key -out DistCertificateSigningRequest.certSigningRequest -subj '/emailAddress=joe@example.com, CN=Joe Example, C=UK'

On the “What type of certificate do you need?” Apple page, say “iOS App Development”. Go through its little wizard and upload your DistCertificateSigningRequest.certSigningRequest file. It will give you back a ios_distribution.cer file.

# Convert ios_distribution.cer to ios_distribution.pem openssl x509 -in ios_distribution.cer -inform DER -out ios_distribution.pem -outform PEM # Convert ios_distribution.pem to ios_distribution.p12. Enter a password and remember it for later. openssl pkcs12 -export -inkey private.key -in ios_distribution.pem -out ios_distribution.p12 Add your phone as a Device

On the Apple page, on the left, it has a “Devices” section. Add a new device. For this, you’ll need the UDID of your iPhone. Do not use one of the apps on the App Store to get this: Apple changed things in iOS 7 so that apps can’t read your real UDID: they get a vendor-specific fake one. If you’ve got what you think is the UDID of your phone and it begins in FFFF then it’s not your actual UDID; it’s a vendor-specific fake UDID, and that will not work here. Instead, plug your iPhone into your Ubuntu machine with USB, and then run

$ lsusb -v 2>/dev/null | grep -e "Apple Inc" -A 2
iManufacturer 1 Apple Inc.
iProduct 2 iPhone
iSerial 3 472585[censored]

The iSerial is your actual UDID. Use it to add your phone as a new Device on the Apple developer portal.

Add your app

Also on the left of the Apple page, there’s Identifiers > App IDs. Add a new App ID for the app you’re planning to build.

Get a Provisioning Profile

You now need a Provisioning Profile. This is a certificate which is specific to a (p12 key, app, device(s)) combination; that is, you need a new one of these for each combination of app-to-install and device-to-install-it-on. You can add more than one device to a provisioning certificate, though.

Under Provisioning Profiles on the left on the Apple page, add a new profile for your chosen combination of (key, app, device). It will give you a something.mobileprovision file to download.

Add keys to PhoneGap Build

In the PhoneGap Build Edit Account page, go to Signing Keys and upload your p12 key and mobileprovision file. Unlock the key by entering the password you created for it. On your app’s PGB page you should now be able to select that key under iOS and build your app for iOS. Finally, point your selected device’s Safari browser at the download URL for your iOS app (https://build.phonegap.com/apps/PGB_APPID/download/ios) and you’ll be able to install it.

Done. An iOS app built with Ubuntu. Thank you to Apple for opening up the ability to administer this stuff through the web, PhoneGap for providing the Build service, and Breeze for working out how to tie it all together.

Categories: LUG Community Blogs

Aq: Building a (PhoneGap) iOS app from Ubuntu entirely without Mac OS X

Planet WolvesLUG - Tue, 11/02/2014 - 12:11

The Major: But, Fawlty, how did the starling get in the bar?
Basil: No, no, no. You were in the bar.
The Major: I was in the bar? Yes! Yes, I was!
Basil: And the starling was in the garden, and the rat was nowhere at all.

It is possible, with the aid of PhoneGap and Adobe’s PhoneGap Build service, to make an app for iOS, get it signed, and deploy it to an iPhone without having a Mac involved at all. Up until yesterday I would have sworn up and down that this was not possible, and I told a bunch of people that; making a PhoneGap app isn’t a problem from Ubuntu, but getting the necessary keys to get it signed is. However, thanks to a writeup from BreezeJS I now know that this is not the truth. It’s possible to make an iOS app in Ubuntu and get it signed, I’ve done it, and now I’ll walk through that process. This description owes a lot to the Breeze writeup without which I’d be nowhere, but exactly what the screens look like has changed a little. Links and instructions correct as of 11th February 2014.

Make a PhoneGap app

No instructions for this bit. Read the PhoneGap documentation. Once you’ve built that, you’ll have a www/ folder with the HTML, CSS, and JavaScript of your app in it.

Get a PhoneGap Build account and add your app

Also no instructions for this bit, other than to say this: the app bundle that you upload or pull from Github does not have to contain just the contents of your www folder. I pointed PGB at a Github repos which had the www/ folder at top level and other things in the repos too, and it worked fine. Remember that your config.xml file which configures PGB needs to be in the same folder as index.html.

Get an iOS developer account

Sign up for the Apple Developer Programme. To build iOS apps this will cost you sixty quid. Once you get an email saying that you have access to iTunes Connect, you’ve been approved. Do what it tells you and fill out a bunch of forms about your bank account and address and so on.

Set up certificates

Go to the Apple Developer Member Centre and choose Certificates, Identifiers & Profiles, then under iOS Apps choose Certificates. You’ll probably see a screen saying “What type of certificate do you need?”; if you don’t, there’s a [+] button to add a new certificate.

The first thing you need is the Apple intermediate signing certificate, available from this screen. At the bottom it says Worldwide Developer Relations Certificate Authority; download this AppleWWDRCA.cer file and keep it around somewhere.

Development p12 key

Now, set yourself up a development p12 key as follows.

# Generate your private key openssl genrsa -out private.key 2048 # Generate a certificate signing request. Use your own email address! openssl req -new -key private.key -out CertificateSigningRequest.certSigningRequest -subj '/emailAddress=joe@example.com, CN=Joe Example, C=UK'

On the “What type of certificate do you need?” Apple page, say “iOS App Development”. Go through its little wizard and upload your CertificateSigningRequest.certSigningRequest file. It will give you back a ios_development.cer file.

# Convert ios_development.cer to ios_development.pem openssl x509 -in ios_development.cer -inform DER -out ios_development.pem -outform PEM # Convert ios_development.pem to ios_development.p12. Enter a password and remember it for later. openssl pkcs12 -export -inkey private.key -in ios_development.pem -out ios_development.p12 Distribution p12 key

Now, generate a distribution p12 key in the same way:

# Generate a certificate signing request. Use your own email address! openssl req -new -key private.key -out DistCertificateSigningRequest.certSigningRequest -subj '/emailAddress=joe@example.com, CN=Joe Example, C=UK'

On the “What type of certificate do you need?” Apple page, say “iOS App Development”. Go through its little wizard and upload your DistCertificateSigningRequest.certSigningRequest file. It will give you back a ios_distribution.cer file.

# Convert ios_distribution.cer to ios_distribution.pem openssl x509 -in ios_distribution.cer -inform DER -out ios_distribution.pem -outform PEM # Convert ios_distribution.pem to ios_distribution.p12. Enter a password and remember it for later. openssl pkcs12 -export -inkey private.key -in ios_distribution.pem -out ios_distribution.p12 Add your phone as a Device

On the Apple page, on the left, it has a “Devices” section. Add a new device. For this, you’ll need the UDID of your iPhone. Do not use one of the apps on the App Store to get this: Apple changed things in iOS 7 so that apps can’t read your real UDID: they get a vendor-specific fake one. If you’ve got what you think is the UDID of your phone and it begins in FFFF then it’s not your actual UDID; it’s a vendor-specific fake UDID, and that will not work here. Instead, plug your iPhone into your Ubuntu machine with USB, and then run

$ lsusb -v 2>/dev/null | grep -e "Apple Inc" -A 2 iManufacturer 1 Apple Inc. iProduct 2 iPhone iSerial 3 472585[censored]

The iSerial is your actual UDID. Use it to add your phone as a new Device on the Apple developer portal.

Add your app

Also on the left of the Apple page, there’s Identifiers > App IDs. Add a new App ID for the app you’re planning to build.

Get a Provisioning Profile

You now need a Provisioning Profile. This is a certificate which is specific to a (p12 key, app, device(s)) combination; that is, you need a new one of these for each combination of app-to-install and device-to-install-it-on. You can add more than one device to a provisioning certificate, though.

Under Provisioning Profiles on the left on the Apple page, add a new profile for your chosen combination of (key, app, device). It will give you a something.mobileprovision file to download.

Add keys to PhoneGap Build

In the PhoneGap Build Edit Account page, go to Signing Keys and upload your p12 key and mobileprovision file. Unlock the key by entering the password you created for it. On your app’s PGB page you should now be able to select that key under iOS and build your app for iOS. Finally, point your selected device’s Safari browser at the download URL for your iOS app (https://build.phonegap.com/apps/PGB_APPID/download/ios) and you’ll be able to install it.

Done. An iOS app built with Ubuntu. Thank you to Apple for opening up the ability to administer this stuff through the web, PhoneGap for providing the Build service, and Breeze for working out how to tie it all together.

Categories: LUG Community Blogs

Ron Wellsted: Health Update

Planet WolvesLUG - Tue, 11/02/2014 - 10:05

A few of you will know that I have been unwell recently.

The situation is that at the begining of December 2013, I was diagnosed with a form of heart disease known as Atrial Fibrillation. The main symptom of this is an iregular heart beat.

read more

Categories: LUG Community Blogs

Jono Bacon: The Next Ubuntu Developer Summit: 11-13 March 2014

Planet WolvesLUG - Tue, 11/02/2014 - 00:55

The Ubuntu Developer Summit is the primary place where we discuss, debate, and plan the future of Ubuntu. The entire event takes place online, is open and accessible to all, and every session is recorded so everyone can see how decisions are made. It is a useful, fun, and rewarding event to join.

My apologies for the delay in announcing the next event. The last few months have been somewhat hectic and we wanted to wait for some confirmed conference/sprint dates across Ubuntu Engineering and cross-check those with our release schedule before committing to final dates so we can ensure as many people are there as possible.

I can now confirm that our next Ubuntu Developer Summit will take place from Tues 11th March 2014 – Thurs 13th March 2014. I wanted to let you all know ASAP so you can get it in your calendars. summit.ubuntu.com is updated and ready to start having sessions added or proposed.

This next UDS will look and feel much like the last one; the same tracks and format. The feedback we have received from the last UDS suggests that the changes we made were well received. As ever, your feedback is always welcome.

If you want to have a session at UDS, please see this guide for how to propose it. As usual, feel free to ask for help from myself or Michael Hall, David Planella, or Daniel Holbach,

Categories: LUG Community Blogs

Debian Bits: skyrocketing how-can-i-help popcon count

Planet HantsLUG - Mon, 10/02/2014 - 21:00

This is a repost from Stefano Zacchiroli's post

how-can-i-help by Lucas Nussbaum is one of the best things that happened in the area of attracting contributions to Debian in quite a while. It can be used both as a standalone tool to list opportunities for contributing to Debian which are related to your installed packages, and as an APT hook (which is also the default configuration) that at each upgrade will inform you of new contribution opportunities.

how-can-i-help is great for newbies who are looking for ways to give back to Debian which are a good match for their skills: among other things, how-can-i-help shows bugs tagged "gift" related to packages you use.

how-can-i-help is also great for experienced developers, as it allows them to find out, in a timely manner, that packages they use are in dire need of help: RC bugs, pending removals, adoptions needed, requests for sponsor, etc. (As highly unscientific evidence: I've noticed a rather quick turnover of RFA/O/ITA bugs on packages installed on my machine. I suspect how-can-i-help is somehow responsible for that, due to the fact that it increases awareness of ongoing package issues directly with the people using them.)

So, if you haven't yet, please apt-get install how-can-i-help RIGHT NOW.

I daresay that we should aim at installing how-can-i-help by default on all Debian machines, but that might be an ambitious initial goal. In the meantime I'll settle for making how-can-i-help's popcon count skyrocket. As of today, it looks like this:

which is definitely too low for my taste. Please spread the word about how-can-i-help. And let's see what we can collectively do to that graph.

how-can-i-help is just a tiny teeny helper, but I'm convinced it can do wonders in liberating dormant contributions to the Debian Project.

Categories: LUG Community Blogs

Tony Whitmore: Malawi Mountain Madness – update

Planet HantsLUG - Mon, 10/02/2014 - 20:50

Later this year I am going to do something stupid. I’m going to climb Mount Mulanje, the highest mountain in southern Africa. It will take 5 days to get up and I’ll be carrying a heavy pack all the way.

People keep asking me if I’m in training. I’m not. I probably should be. What those people don’t know is that it’s not climbing the 3,002m peak that worries me. It’s the insects. I am extremely attractive to insects. Even in the UK I get bitten, a lot. When I was working on an outdoor theatre production I got bitten so much that they put it in the accident book.

I’m doing all this for AMECA, a UK charity who have built a sustainable hospital in Malawi. Adults pay for their treatment, which funds free medical care for children. Sadly there is no NHS in Malawi. So, is this just about helping people in Africa? (As if that wasn’t reason enough!) No.

The money that I’m raising pays bursaries for nurses from the UK to go to Malawi and work out there for 6 months. The nurses get valuable experience that they bring back to the UK. Everyone benefits.

I first wrote about this last summer, and I’ve had a lot of generous sponsorship from people. Only some of whom want me to suffer whilst I’m doing the climb. Some generous people donated anonymously, so I can’t thank them in person. But thank you. Thank you so so much to everyone who has helped. I really do appreciate it.

I’ve only got 4 months to reach my fundraising target of £2,550. If you can help out, the link is right here:

Please donate on my Virgin Money page

All the money goes straight to AMECA. Thank you.

Pin It
Categories: LUG Community Blogs

Steve Kemp: Sad times

Planet HantsLUG - Mon, 10/02/2014 - 14:09

There are times when I'm very proud of the Debian project, the developers, the contributors, the bug-reporters, even the users.

There are times when I'm less impressed.

These days I guess I'm not qualified to comment, being an ex-developer, but I still am disappointed.

Part of me wants to rejoin the project, to see if I can help. The other part is thinking there are other choices, maybe I should look at them.

Conflict is bad.

Being conflicted is worse.

Categories: LUG Community Blogs
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