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Surrey LUG Bring-A-Box 8th Nov 2014, Lion Brewery

Surrey LUG - Sun, 02/11/2014 - 23:19
Start: 2014-11-08 11:00 End: 2014-11-08 17:00

We have regular sessions on the second Saturday of each month. Bring a 'box', bring a notebook, bring anything that might run Linux, or just bring yourself and enjoy socialising/learning/teaching or simply chilling out!

This month's meeting is at the Lion Brewery Pub in Ash, Surrey.

New members are very welcome. We're not a cliquey bunch, so you won't feel out of place! Usually between 15 and 30 people come along.

Categories: LUG Community Blogs

Steve Kemp: IPv6 only server

Planet HantsLUG - Sun, 02/11/2014 - 10:54

I enjoy the tilde.club site/community, and since I've just setup an IPv6-only host I was looking to do something similar.

Unfortunately my (working) code to clone github repositories into per-user directories fails - because github isn't accessible over IPv6.

That's a shame.

Oddly enough chromium, the browser packaged for wheezy, doesn't want to display IPv6-only websites either. For example this site fail to load http://ipv6.steve.org.uk/.

In the meantime I've got a server setup which is only accessible over IPv6 and I'm a little smug. (http://ipv6.website/).

(Yes it is true that I've used all the IPv4 addreses allocated to my VLAN. That's just a coincidence. Ssh!)

Categories: LUG Community Blogs

Chris Lamb: Are you building an internet fridge?

Planet ALUG - Thu, 30/10/2014 - 18:00

Mikkel Rasmussen:

If you look at the idea of "The Kitchen of Tomorrow" as IKEA thought about it is the core idea is that cooking is slavery.

It's the idea that technology can free us from making food. It can do it for us. It can recognise who we are, we don't have to be tied to the kitchen all day, we don't have to think about it.

Now if you're an anthropologist, they would tell you that cooking is perhaps one of the most complicated things you can think about when it comes to the human condition. If you think about your own cooking habits they probably come from your childhood, the nation you're from, the region you're from. It takes a lot of skill to cook. It's not so easy.

And actually, it's quite fun to cook. there's also a lot of improvisation. I don't know if you ever tried to come home to a fridge and you just look into the fridge: oh, there's a carrot and some milk and some white wine and you figure it out. That's what cooking is like – it's a very human thing to do.

The physical version of your smart recipe site?


Therefore, if you think about it, having anything that automates this for you or decides for you or improvises for you is actually not doing anything to help you with what you want to do, which is that it's nice to cook.

More generally, if you make technology—for example—that has at its core the idea that cooking is slavery and that idea is wrong, then your technology will fail. Not because of the technology, but because it simply gets people wrong.

This happens all the time. You cannot swing a cat these days without hitting one of those refrigerator companies that make smart fridges. I don't know you've ever seen them, like a "intelligent fridge". There's so many of them that there is actually a website called "Fuck your internet fridge" by a guy who tracks failed prototypes on intelligent fridges.

Why? Because the idea is wrong. Not the technology, but the idea about who we are - that we do not want the kitchen to be automated for us.

We want to cook. We want Japanese knives. We want complicated cooking. And so what we are saying here is not that technology is wrong as such. It's just you need to base it—especially when you are innovating really big ideas—on something that's a true human insight. And cooking as slavery is not a true human insight and therefore the prototypes will fail.

(I hereby nominate "internet fridge" as the term to describe products or ideas that—whilst technologically sound—is based on fundamentally flawed anthropology.)

Hearing "I hate X" and thinking that simply removing X will provide real value to your users is short-sighted, especially when you don't really understand why humans are doing X in the first place.

Categories: LUG Community Blogs

Steve Kemp: A brief introduction to freebsd

Planet HantsLUG - Wed, 29/10/2014 - 18:37

I've spent the past thirty minutes installing FreeBSD as a KVM guest. This mostly involved fetching the ISO (I chose the latest stable release 10.0), and accepting all the defaults. A pleasant experience.

As I'm running KVM inside screen I wanted to see the boot prompt, etc, via the serial console, which took two distinct steps:

  • Enabling the serial console - which lets boot stuff show up
  • Enabling a login prompt on the serial console in case I screw up the networking.

To configure boot messages to display via the serial console, issue the following command as the superuser:

# echo 'console="comconsole"' >> /boot/loader.conf

To get a login: prompt you'll want to edit /etc/ttys and change "off" to "on" and "dialup" to "vt100" for the ttyu0 entry. Once you've done that reload init via:

# kill -HUP 1

Enable remote root logins, if you're brave, or disable PAM and password authentication if you're sensible:

vi /etc/ssh/sshd_config /etc/rc.d/sshd restart

Configure the system to allow binary package-installation - to be honest I was hazy on why this was required, but I ran the two command and it all worked out:

pkg pkg2ng

Now you may install a package via a simple command such as:

pkg add screen

Removing packages you no longer want is as simple as using the delete option:

pkg delete curl

You can see installed packages via "pkg info", and there are more options to be found via "pkg help". In the future you can apply updates via:

pkg update && pkg upgrade

Finally I've installed 10.0-RELEASE which can be upgraded in the future via "freebsd-update" - This seems to boil down to "freebsd-update fetch" and "freebsd-update install" but I'm hazy on that just yet. For the moment you can see your installed version via:

uname -a ; freebsd-version

Expect my future CPAN releases, etc, to be tested on FreeBSD too now :)

Categories: LUG Community Blogs

Steve Engledow (stilvoid): When all the things went wrong

Planet ALUG - Mon, 27/10/2014 - 23:34

The last few weeks have seen several bits of technology fail that affect my everyday life.

It started with the locks on my car beginning to seize up. To begin with, they were just a bit stiff, then one of them stopped working altogether. Then they all stopped working with any regularity. I took the car to a garage who told me it's a common problem with this exact model and charged me £100 to replace the driver's side lock. Apparently, a full set would cost around £600.

So now I'm left with two car keys; one to get in, and one for the ignition.

Second, I somehow left the cable for my bicycle light charger hanging out of the car door on a journey. When I arrived, I found it looking quite mangled.

Thirdly, last night when my wife came home, she and I both turned our keys in the lock at the same time from different sides of the front door (without realising). This somehow broke the damn lock. Now the key doesn't turn all the way and the door can be locked but the key must remain in it.

So now we have to leave by the back door.

Fourth, while at rehearsal tonight with my band, my keyboard started playing up; it complains that the battery is low whilst running off mains power. Thinking maybe the adapter was playing up, I tried another with the same result.

Bleh.

Categories: LUG Community Blogs

Meeting at "The Moon Under Water"

Wolverhampton LUG News - Mon, 27/10/2014 - 09:57
Event-Date: Wednesday, 29 October, 2014 - 19:30 to 23:00Body: 53-55 Lichfield St Wolverhampton West Midlands WV1 1EQ Eat, Drink and talk Linux
Categories: LUG Community Blogs

Sprinting in DC

Planet SurreyLUG - Fri, 24/10/2014 - 17:17

For the last week I’ve been working with 230 other Ubuntu people in Washington, DC. We have sprints like this pretty frequently now and are a great way to collaborate and Get Things Done™ at high velocity.

This is the second sprint where we’ve invited some of the developers who are blazing a trail with our Core Apps project. Not everyone could make it to the sprint, and those who didn’t were certainly missed. These are people who give their own time to work on some of the featured and default apps on the Ubuntu Phone, and perhaps in the future on the converged desktop.

It’s been a busy week with discussion & planning punctuating intense hacking sessions. Once again I’m proud of the patience, professionalism and and hard work done by these guys working on bringing up our core apps project on a phone that hasn’t event shipped a single device yet!

We’ve spent much of the week discussing and resolving design issues, fixing performance bugs, crashers and platform integration issues, as well as the odd game of ‘Cards Against Humanity’ & ‘We Didn’t Playtest This At All’ in the bar afterwards.

Having 10 community developers in the same place as 200+ Canonical people accelerates things tremendously. Being able to go and sit with the SDK team allowed Robert Schroll to express his issues with the tools when developing Beru, the ebook reader. When Filippo Scognamiglio needed help with mouse and touch input, we could grab Florian Boucault and Daniel d’Andrada to provide tips. Having Renato Filho nearby to fix problems in Evolution Data Server allowed Kunal Parmar and Mihir Soni to resolve calendar issues. The list goes on.

All week we’ve been collaborating towards a common goal of high quality, beautiful, performant and stable applications for the phone today, and desktop of the future. It’s been an incredibly fun and productive week, and I’m a little sad to be heading home today. But I’m happy that we’ve had this time together to improve the free software we all care deeply about.

The relationships built up during these sprints will of course endure. We all exchange email addresses and IRC nicknames, so we can continue the conversation once the sprint is over. Development and meetings will continue beyond the sprint, in the virtual world of IRC, hangouts and mailing lists.

Categories: LUG Community Blogs

Alan Pope: Sprinting in DC

Planet HantsLUG - Fri, 24/10/2014 - 17:17

For the last week I’ve been working with 230 other Ubuntu people in Washington, DC. We have sprints like this pretty frequently now and are a great way to collaborate and Get Things Done™ at high velocity.

This is the second sprint where we’ve invited some of the developers who are blazing a trail with our Core Apps project. Not everyone could make it to the sprint, and those who didn’t were certainly missed. These are people who give their own time to work on some of the featured and default apps on the Ubuntu Phone, and perhaps in the future on the converged desktop.

It’s been a busy week with discussion & planning punctuating intense hacking sessions. Once again I’m proud of the patience, professionalism and and hard work done by these guys working on bringing up our core apps project on a phone that hasn’t event shipped a single device yet!

We’ve spent much of the week discussing and resolving design issues, fixing performance bugs, crashers and platform integration issues, as well as the odd game of ‘Cards Against Humanity’ & ‘We Didn’t Playtest This At All’ in the bar afterwards.

Having 10 community developers in the same place as 200+ Canonical people accelerates things tremendously. Being able to go and sit with the SDK team allowed Robert Schroll to express his issues with the tools when developing Beru, the ebook reader. When Filippo Scognamiglio needed help with mouse and touch input, we could grab Florian Boucault and Daniel d’Andrada to provide tips. Having Renato Filho nearby to fix problems in Evolution Data Server allowed Kunal Parmar and Mihir Soni to resolve calendar issues. The list goes on.

All week we’ve been collaborating towards a common goal of high quality, beautiful, performant and stable applications for the phone today, and desktop of the future. It’s been an incredibly fun and productive week, and I’m a little sad to be heading home today. But I’m happy that we’ve had this time together to improve the free software we all care deeply about.

The relationships built up during these sprints will of course endure. We all exchange email addresses and IRC nicknames, so we can continue the conversation once the sprint is over. Development and meetings will continue beyond the sprint, in the virtual world of IRC, hangouts and mailing lists.

Categories: LUG Community Blogs
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