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Aq: Mozilla add HTML5 DRM, sadly but inevitably

Planet WolvesLUG - Thu, 15/05/2014 - 11:34

“If all your friends jumped off a bridge, would you jump too?”
“Oh jeez. Probably.”
“What!? Why!?”
“Because all my friends did.”

— xkcd, Bridge

Mozilla have decided to implement the HTML5 EME DRM for videos. This sucks.

I don’t like the EME stuff. It’s contrary to the whole idea of the web. It’s potentially the beginning of a slippery slope of web pages being locked off because that’s what the ebook people want. I wrote about this last year. Jeremy says that it is precisely because other technologies are locked down that it’s important to keep the web open, and he’s right.

But… that didn’t happen. The web is not open. Google and Microsoft and Apple have already started implementing EME, over the complaints of precisely nobody. The argument that adding DRMed video divides the web into haves and have-nots apparently didn’t cut any ice with those browser vendors. So Mozilla reluctantly fall in line, and are castigated for it in a way that the others weren’t.

Now, there’s a reasonable argument that Mozilla should be held to a higher standard, because their goal actually embodies the Open Web and the others are primarily about profits and market share. Mozilla should stand on principle, precisely because they have principles. I admire this argument, but unfortunately it’s like perpetual motion machines, the 200mpg carburettor, and the rehydrateable pizza from Back to the Future — it doesn’t work. The world isn’t nice just because you wish real hard. Mozilla have stood on principle in the past, by refusing to implement H.264 format video. It made no difference. They were laughed at for not being “modern”, their users just found that some videos mysteriously wouldn’t play, they were told that standing on principle made them irrelevant, and it made no difference to the market. They have a voice at the table, but it’s not loud enough to move the industry when the industry want something else.

The last people to try this other than Mozilla were Opera. The Opera team devoted their time to being standards compliant, working to improve those standards where possible, taking the decision to be correct rather than compatible in most cases, and what happened? Nobody used their browser because it didn’t work, and now they use Blink as their renderer instead.

I like the warm fuzzy feeling I get from knowing that Mozilla are out there doing the right thing. But there’s always been an edge of, well, they’re doing the right thing which means that I don’t have to. Firefox should stand on principle here and refuse to play DRMed videos… but of course I’m not going to stop using DRMed video, I’ll just use Safari for that. The warm fuzzy feeling is jolly nice, but it’s not enough to actually keep the Mozilla organisation running. If you dislike Mozilla doing this (which I do, too), then where’s the outcry against Apple and Microsoft and Google for doing the same thing? Where’s the outcry against them for doing it first? Mozilla helps keep the web open for us, but in return we have to help keep the web open for Mozilla. And we aren’t.

Categories: LUG Community Blogs

Jono Bacon: Announcing Ubuntu Pioneers

Planet WolvesLUG - Tue, 13/05/2014 - 17:24

Ubuntu has always been about breaking new ground. We broke the ground with the desktop back in 2004, we have broken the ground with cloud orchestration across multiple clouds and providers, and we are building a powerful, innovative mobile and desktop platform that is breaking ground with convergence.

The hardest part about breaking new ground and innovating is not having the vision and creating the technology, it is getting people on board to be part of it.

We knew this was going to be a challenge when we first took the wraps off the Ubuntu app developer platform: we have a brand new platform that was still being developed, and when we started many of the key pieces were not there such as a solid developer portal, documentation, API references, training and more. Today the story is very different with a compelling, end-to-end, developer story for building powerful convergent apps.

We believed and always have believed in the power of this platform, and every single one of those people who also believed in what we are doing and wrote apps have shared the same spirit of pioneering a new platform that we have.

As such, we want to acknowledge those people.

And with this, I present Ubuntu Pioneers.

The idea is simple, we want to celebrate the first 200 app developers who get their apps in Ubuntu. We are doing this in two ways.

Firstly, we have created http://developer.ubuntu.com/pioneers which displays all of these developers and lists the apps that they have created. This will provide a permanent record of those who were there right at the beginning.

Secondly, we have designed a custom, limited-edition Ubuntu Pioneers t-shirt that we want to send to all of our pioneers. For those of you who are listed on this page, please ensure that your email address is correct in MyApps as we will be getting in touch soon.

Thank-you so much to every single person listed on that page. You are an inspiration for me, my team, and the wider Ubuntu project.

If you have that pioneering spirit and wished you were up there, fear not! We still have some space before we hit 200 developers, so go here to get started building an app.

Categories: LUG Community Blogs

Aq: Some thoughts on soonsnap and little big details

Planet WolvesLUG - Tue, 13/05/2014 - 14:29

I built a thing called soonsnap, and various people said that I should write up how and why.

First, what it’s for.

Here’s the use case. You’re there in the pub, Friday night, and there’s a group of people squeezing themselves together behind a table while one of their number takes a photo of them. So you step up, helpful, and say “hey, let me take that, then you can be in it!” and whip your phone from your pocket and snap a picture of them all pulling faces and drinking cocktails.

Great. You’ve got a picture of them. How do you give that picture to the people in it?

Here are the constraints:

  • You don’t know these people. This is not a surreptitious excuse to obtain the phone number of the attractive one in the group. So you can’t ask for a phone number, or add them as a Facebook friend
  • You’re all in the pub having fun; you’re not at a computer class. You want to get this photo to them as quickly and easily as possible. So if you ask them to do anything complicated to get the photo, such as “install this app”, or “turn on Bluetooth and then tell me your phone’s Bluetooth name”, they’ll just shrug and say “whatever” and ignore you like the sad techie lunatic that you are
  • Either you or they might not have an iPhone, so no AirDrop for you
  • You’re in the pub. So this is primarily for mobile. Obviously it should work on a big wide screen, but that’s not what it’s aimed at
  • Me, the person running the server, does not want to pay for lots of hosting, and people in the pub don’t want photos of them stored forever in someone else’s cloud. Images are not stored on the server; they’re transferred as much as possible device-to-device

Sometimes, the people asking for a photo will hand you a phone to take it with. At that point, you don’t need any technology to assist; take the picture, give the phone back, done. But if they don’t… you need to get that picture to them.

The one huge overriding goal here is complete ease of use. Anything at all which can be construed as a barrier will mean that you’re unsuccessful. “To get the picture, install this app” takes too long and is too annoying. “Turn on Bluetooth” is too annoying. “Turn on Android Beam” is too annoying. This means the solution needs to be on the web, because everybody has that.

But it should feel like an app, because people are accustomed to that and so the sense of familiarity is important. It’s a very simple set of actions: either “take a photo” or “receive a photo”. So the thing I came up with, soonsnap, is this:

  1. You hit this website and it tells you to pick or take a photo
  2. It gives you a simple four-letter code and gives you instructions to read out to them: go to this website, enter the four letters of the code
  3. They do it: it gives them the photo
  4. You say “there you go”, they say “thank you!”, and another little human interaction is improved with technology without getting in the way

So there are two paths through it: the photo taker, and the photo getter. The taker needs to say “take a photo”, then take the photo, then get a nice clear set of instructions and a code to tell to the getter. The getter needs to get to the website itself, say “receive a photo”, type in the code. That’s it.

To this end, all the thinking went into making soonsnap so it’s really hard to screw the interaction up. Take the codes as an example. They’re four characters — long enough that a code isn’t reasonably guessable, short enough that you can say it to someone else in a crowded bar and they’ll hear you. The code does not repeat any characters. This is done so that when tapping a letter of the code, that letter disappears and can’t be used again — this prevents someone accidentally tapping a letter twice. The characters used for the code could have been all 36 letters and numbers, but it’s actually only 20: 0123456789ACFHNRUWXY. This is so that all letters which sound the same are removed; this stops someone saying “did you say B zero one two or P zero one two?”, especially if you’re shouting over the music in a crowded pub.

And it looks simple but colourful and clear to make it easy to see what’s going on even if your vision’s a bit blurry. I wanted it to be attractive partially because of the aesthetic usability effect, and partially just because, well, things should be pretty. I knew I couldn’t do that, so I talked to Sam Hewitt who put together a great visual design for soonsnap. Thank you, Sam!

Technologically, soonsnap is designed so that images aren’t stored on the server. Partially this is for security — there’s no big archive there, and your photos aren’t being kept around by a service you don’t trust — and partially for cost, because it’s not supposed to be a big photo archive. It’s used to send photos. Soonsnap uses socket.io, which is basically a self-hosted version of something like pubnub. So the images go through the soonsnap server, but they’re transmitted from sender to receiver and aren’t kept around on the server. I’d have liked to do that with WebRTC so that it’s genuinely peer-to-peer and doesn’t involve the server at all, but firstly you need to set up a STUN server to do that and that’s complicated, and secondly iPhones don’t do WebRTC yet.

Categories: LUG Community Blogs

Aq: Nomad CHARGEKEY/CHARGECARD review

Planet WolvesLUG - Mon, 12/05/2014 - 22:40

Recently I received a gift from Nomad, one each of their CHARGEKEY and CHARGECARD products. So I’ve been trying them out. They’re both similar in concept, so I’ll speak of them as one item for now.

Basically, it’s a very very portable charging lead for your phone. The CHARGEKEY is about two inches long, with a slim full USB plug1 on one end and either a micro USB or an iPhone 5 lightning plug on the other.2 And there’s a little place to attach it to your keyring. Basically, the idea here is that you’ll stick this on your keyring and the next time you find yourself somewhere where you’d want to charge your phone you’ll have a way to do so, without having to carry a long USB charging lead around everywhere you go like some sort of arse. The CHARGECARD is a similar idea, and again comes in two flavours, but instead of being a little stick that hangs unimpedingly on your keys, it’s the size and thickness of a credit card and goes in your wallet, or wherever you keep cards.3

So, the simple verdict: if you often find yourself wishing you’d brought your charging lead with you, you’ll find this bloody useful.

Me… I didn’t, so much. I often find myself wishing that I could charge my phone up, but the problem isn’t that I don’t have a lead: it’s that even if I had a lead I’d have nowhere to plug it in. Pub tables don’t have USB ports. Coffee shops don’t have USB ports. If I’m working from a desk in an office somewhere I’ve got my laptop bag, and that’s got one of every lead I ever need in it (hasn’t yours? Why hasn’t it? Go and put a spare one of every lead you need in your laptop bag!).

I do sometimes find myself places where I could charge up. Coffee shops do have wall sockets. But for that I’d need an actual lead and an adaptor. On my desk, where I am all day, I have a charging lead. Interestingly, whenever I’m at a conference there are always tweets in the backchannel asking if anyone has an iPhone charging lead — it’s never any other phone. So I suspect iPhone people who haven’t grasped the idea of having a spare lead in their bag may find this hugely useful. If you’re taking my above advice about buying a spare lead then getting one of these is no bad idea because it’s tiny.  Similarly, if places of entertainment started putting USB sockets on every table, this would be superbly useful.4

Perhaps I’m unusual, though. To find out, I gave the CHARGEKEY to my dad. And, interestingly, he’s already talking about using it at work. Just plug into the computer in the office, and the lead is on your keyring ready for you when you need it. And it’s not bothering you when you don’t. It’s for drive-by charging. For a moment of opportunity. If you hit those a lot, you’ll like Nomad’s stuff.

Me, I’ll wait until they put USB sockets in bars.

  1. one of those flat ones that plugs into the bottom half of a USB socket
  2. It comes in two flavours; one for iPhones, one for every other device on the planet
  3. Well, it’s about the thickness of two or three credit cards, but it’ll go in your wallet fine; it did in mine
  4. If you’re running a political party in England and you add “USB sockets on every pub table by law!” to your manifesto then you’ve significantly increased your chances of getting my vote, and every other tech person in the country too. Unless you’re UKIP in which case don’t bother
Categories: LUG Community Blogs

Steve Engledow (stilvoid): Eligarf

Planet ALUG - Thu, 08/05/2014 - 22:56

All week so far, I've gone to bed before 10pm every night and have woken up feeling tired, been tired all day, had difficulty focussing during the day, and have still been tired when home from work. I went to bed at 8pm on Wednesday night. Also, my stomach has seemed unsettled. My wife appears to have some of the same symptoms so I don't think I'm about to encounter renal failure or some such mechanical failure of my parts. A very odd illness though. Also, we're both feeling fairly down.

I blame the management.

Dilos

I made a thing for parsing those stupid calendar files sent by Exchange so I can view them nicely in mutt :) I'll put it up somewhere when I've tidied it up a bit more.

Categories: LUG Community Blogs

Surrey LUG Bring-A-Box 10th May 2014

Surrey LUG - Wed, 07/05/2014 - 19:37
Start: 2014-05-10 12:00 End: 2014-05-10 17:00

We have regular sessions on the second Saturday of each month. Bring a 'box', bring a notebook, bring anything that might run Linux, or just bring yourself and enjoy socialising/learning/teaching or simply chilling out!

This month's meeting is at The Feathers Pub, Merstham

42 High St, Merstham, Redhill, Surrey, RH1 3EA ‎
01737 645643 ‎ · http://www.thefeathersmerstham.co.uk

NOTE the pub opens at 12 Noon.

Categories: LUG Community Blogs

David Goodwin: WordPress comment spam post fail

Planet WolvesLUG - Wed, 07/05/2014 - 10:08

While trying to block spam posts on a forum, I noticed this gem.

No doubt someone’s spam sending program has failed, just a little….

{ {I have|I've} been {surfing|browsing} online more than {three|3|2|4} hours today, yet I never found any interesting article like yours. {It's|It is} pretty worth enough for me. {In my opinion|Personally|In my view}, if all {webmasters|site owners|website owners|web owners} and bloggers made good content as you did, the {internet|net|web} will be {much more|a lot more} useful than ever before.| I {couldn't|could not} {resist|refrain from} commenting. {Very well|Perfectly|Well|Exceptionally well} written!| {I will|I'll} {right away|immediately} {take hold of|grab|clutch|grasp|seize|snatch} your {rss|rss feed} as I {can not|can't} {in finding|find|to find} your {email|e-mail} subscription {link|hyperlink} or {newsletter|e-newsletter} service. Do {you have|you've} any? {Please|Kindly} {allow|permit|let} me {realize|recognize|understand|recognise|know} {so that|in order that} I {may just|may|could} subscribe. Thanks.| {It is|It's} {appropriate|perfect|the best} time to make some plans for the future and {it is|it's} time to be happy. {I have|I've} read this post and if I could I {want to|wish to|desire to} suggest you {few|some} interesting things or {advice|suggestions|tips}. {Perhaps|Maybe} you {could|can} write next articles referring to this article. I {want to|wish to|desire to} read {more|even more} things about it!| {It is|It's} {appropriate|perfect|the best} time to make {a few|some} plans for {the future|the longer term|the long run} and {it is|it's} time to be happy. {I have|I've} {read|learn} this {post|submit|publish|put up} and if I {may just|may|could} I {want to|wish to|desire to} {suggest|recommend|counsel} you {few|some} {interesting|fascinating|attention-grabbing} {things|issues} or {advice|suggestions|tips}. {Perhaps|Maybe} you {could|can} write {next|subsequent} articles {relating to|referring to|regarding} this article. I {want to|wish to|desire to} {read|learn} {more|even more} {things|issues} {approximately|about} it!| {I have|I've} been {surfing|browsing} {online|on-line} {more than|greater than} {three|3} hours {these days|nowadays|today|lately|as of late}, {yet|but} I {never|by no means} {found|discovered} any {interesting|fascinating|attention-grabbing} article like yours. {It's|It is} {lovely|pretty|beautiful} {worth|value|price} {enough|sufficient} for me. {In my opinion|Personally|In my view}, if all {webmasters|site owners|website owners|web owners} and bloggers made {just right|good|excellent} {content|content material} as {you did|you probably did}, the {internet|net|web} {will be|shall be|might be|will probably be|can be|will likely be} {much more|a lot more} {useful|helpful} than ever before.| Ahaa, its {nice|pleasant|good|fastidious} {discussion|conversation|dialogue} {regarding|concerning|about|on the topic of} this {article|post|piece of writing|paragraph} ....
Categories: LUG Community Blogs

Richard Lewis: Refocusing Ph.D

Planet ALUG - Wed, 07/05/2014 - 00:16

Actual progress on this Ph.D revision has been quite slow. My current efforts are on improving the focus of the thesis. One of the criticisms the examiners made (somewhat obliquely) was that it wasn&apost very clear exactly what my subject was: musicology? music information retrieval? computational musicology? And the reason for this was that I failed to make that clear to myself. It was only at the writing up stage, when I was trying to put together a coherent argument, that I decided to try and make it a story about music information retrieval (MIR). I tried to argue that MIR&aposs existing evaluation work (which was largely modelled on information retrieval evaluation from the text world) only took into account the music information needs of recreational users of MIR systems, and that there was very little in the way of studying the music information seeking behaviour of "serious" users. However, the examiners didn&apost even accept that information retrieval was an important problem for musicology, nevermind that there was work to be done in examining music information needs of music scholarship.

So I&aposm using this as an excuse to shift the focus away from MIR a little and towards something more like computational musicology and music informatics. I&aposm putting together a case study of a computational musicology toolkit called music21. Doing this allows me to focus in more detail on a smaller and more distinct community of users (rather than attempting to studying musicologists in general which was another problematic feature of the thesis), it makes it much clearer what kind of music research can be addressed using the technology (all of MIR is either far too diverse or far too generic, depending on how you want to spin it), and also allows me to work with the actually Purcell Plus project materials using the toolkit.

Categories: LUG Community Blogs

Jono Bacon: Unwrapping ‘Dealing With Disrespect’

Planet WolvesLUG - Fri, 02/05/2014 - 06:28

With the growth of the Internet and the ease of publishing content, more and more creative minds are coming online to share videos, music, software, products, services, opinions, and more. While the technology has empowered a generation to build new audiences and share interesting things, an unfortunate side-effect has been a culture in which some consumers of this content have provided feedback in a form that is personalized, mean-spirited, disrespectful, and in some cases, malicious.

We have all seen it…the trolls, the haters, the comment boxes filled with venom and vitriol, typically pointed at people just trying to do good and interesting things.

Unfortunately, this conduct can be jarring for many people, with some going as far to give up sharing their creative endeavours so as not to deal with the “wrath of the Internet”.

As some of you will know, this has been bothering me for a while now. While there is no silver bullet for solving these issues, one thing I have learned over the years is how to put negative, anti-social, and non-constructive comments and feedback into perspective.

To help others with this I have written a free book called Dealing With Disrespect.

Dealing With Disrespect is a short, simple to read, free book that provides a straight-forward guide for handling this kind of challenging feedback, picking out the legitimate criticism to learn from, and how to not just ignore the haters, but how to manage them. The book helps put all communication, whether on or offline, into perspective and helps you to become a better communicator yourself.

My goal with the book is that when someone reads something anti-social that demotivates them, a friend can recommend ‘Dealing With Disrespect’ as something that can help put things in perspective.

Go and check out the new website, watch the introductory video, and go and grab the PDF, read it online, or get it for your Kindle. There is also a FAQ.

The book is licensed under a Creative Commons license, and I encourage everyone who enjoys it and finds it useful to share it.

Categories: LUG Community Blogs

David Goodwin: Automated twitter compilation up to 01 May 2014

Planet WolvesLUG - Thu, 01/05/2014 - 06:00

Arbitrary tweets made by TheGingerDog up to 01 May 2014

  • RT Freelancer travel update.

2014/04/30

  • RT Star Wars humor:
  • 2014/04/30

  • RT mv Picture{,-of-my-cat}.jpg # I find brace expansion very useful for renaming files. Expands to “mv Picture.jpg Picture-of-my-cat.jpg” 2014/04/30
  • RT jmespath.php – Declaratively specify how to extract elements from a JSON document, in PHP https://github.com/mtdowling/jmespath.php 2014/04/30
  • RT I would love to see that at @plazacoffee #Bromsgrove metro.co.uk/2014/04/28/moomin-cafe-offers-lonely-customers-stuffed-animals-to-sit-with-during-lunch-4711473/ 2014/04/30
  • RT “@PigeonJon: Feral Pete has lost a bit of Weight. ”nearly choked on my wine when I saw this.
  • 2014/04/27

    Categories: LUG Community Blogs

    MJ Ray: The Kelly Lessons in About 1555 Characters

    Planet ALUG - Thu, 01/05/2014 - 05:46

    So the Kelly report “of the independent review into the events leading to the Co-operative Bank’s capital shortfall” was published yesterday. During the day, I was putting odd bits from it out in 140 characters with the hashtags #coops #kellylessons. Here they are in one more permanent place. How many of these lessons has your organisation – whether a co-op or not – learned?

    1. “Running a full-service bank… is a complex business… Bank failed to understand the limits of its own capability”
    2. “The most important task for any board is to put in place the right Executive leadership for the business”
    3. “Ownership of a regulated bank…requires a clearly articulated statement addressing…mgmt & gov’nance relationship”
    4. “Failures in board oversight are inevitable if the criteria used to elect… do not require… the necessary skills”
    5. “A bank board must include sufficient numbers of technically competent directors”
    6. “Boards need…good m’gmt info’ and to demand it if it is not forthcoming. Failure to obtain…explains…failings”
    7. “A bank should develop&implement robust risk gov’nce&oversight and an appropriate control framework”
    8. “IT transformation…keep…as simple as poss’, phase delivery.., deploy the right resources, plan for contingencies”
    9. “Bank should have paid closer attention and responded with greater urgency to what the Regulator told it”
    10. “Pay careful attention to the advice of…external advisors. The Group…ignored well-founded…inconvenient advice”
    11. “Postponing dealing with problems is almost never a sustainable solution.”
    12. “Values…need to be translated into meaningful guidance…The Bank’s ethical positioning should be…more apparent”
    13. “Mantras about scale and ethics are no substitute for strategies grounded in a real understanding”
    14. “Talent management is critical… Lack of capability…driven…by weaknesses in its recruitment&subsequent m’gmt”
    15. “Tolerating…culture of underperformance, weak transparency and a lack of accountability, constrains an organisation”

    Are there other lessons that you would add?

    Categories: LUG Community Blogs

    Chris Lamb: Marlon Brando in the Lake District

    Planet ALUG - Wed, 30/04/2014 - 20:14

    Alan How:

    There's an Italian restaurant somewhere in the Lake District in the north of England. And if you can imagine, there are hills, lots of rain, lakes, and so on and so forth. And inside this Italian restaurant is a huge picture—a wall-sized mural—of Marlon Brando.

    Now, I asked my students once: «Why Marlon Brando?»

    «Well he's The Godfather!»

    «I don't think he was a Godfather, you know...»

    «But he was in that film, wasn't he? It was called The Godfather.»

    «Ah, that film from 40 years ago, virtually.. 1970-something?»

    «Yes, yes, but he was The Godfather then, wasn't he?»

    «You mean if was a mafiosi? He was a leading figure in gangsterland in New York?»

    «Well, yes, he was The Godfather,» they keep saying, «... and he was Italian.»

    «Well, no, actually he was American...»

    So you get this regular kind of placing and misplacing of the real, ie. a very large American actor who played in a film called The Godfather about American gangsters, or Italian-American gangsters, nothing to do with godfathers in Christianity, in the north of England, stuck on a huge wall in a restaurant.

    All of which tells us that it's an Italian restaurant.

    And we don't demure, we don't say "no, that's all untrue", we just take it for granted: "Yeah, that's what it means - it's an Italian restaurant". And it's that kind of slippage between the real and the imagined—or the true and the fictional—which Baudrillard thinks is becoming inceasingly characteristic of how our society goes on.

    Categories: LUG Community Blogs

    Dick Turpin: You can't make this stuff up!

    Planet WolvesLUG - Wed, 30/04/2014 - 13:49
    Office bod: "Ello mate, is xyz there?"
    Me: "I'm afraid he left the office about fifteen minutes ago."
    Office bod: "Well he sent me an email for a second twin monitor. Thing is I want one the same size as Eric"
    Me: "And what size does Eric have?"
    Office bod: "A big one."
    Me: "A big one? Can you be more specific, what size is it?"
    Office bod: "Umm? 58 inch is it?"
    Me: "I have no idea, measure it diagonally from corner to corner."
    Office bod: "700mil"
    Me: [Deep sigh] "So 28" Inch then?"
    Office bod: "Yeah, suppose so."
    Me: "What size is the monitor you currently have?"
    Office bod: "19" inch"
    Me: "So do you want two 28" inch or just one 19" inch as they usually are the same size?"
    Office bod: "I suppose the 19" inch"
    Me: "So what size is the one xyz quoted?"
    Office bod: "Dunno, I just have an email saying xyz is coming over to fit the new monitor."
    Me: "Hang on! xyz went out with a monitor and a USB dual display adapter?"
    Office bod: "Maybe he's coming here then, lets hope it's a 19" inch"

    WTF?

    Categories: LUG Community Blogs

    Tony Whitmore: The Worlds of Doctor Who

    Planet HantsLUG - Mon, 28/04/2014 - 18:33

    My friends over at Big Finish are celebrating fifteen years of producing Doctor Who audio drama this year. To mark the occasion, they will be releasing a special box set called “The Worlds of Doctor Who.” The set comprises four stories with a linking story arc, with each story based around one of the Doctor Who spin-off series that Big Finish have been so successful at producing: Jago and Litefoot, Countermeasures, The Vault and Gallifrey.

    I have been doing some of the photography for the box set and it has been a pleasure attending the recording sessions over the past couple of months. I’m sure I will be writing more about it in the future, but the cover for the box set was released yesterday and the central image is one I took of actor Jamie Glover who plays the evil Mr Rees throughout the four stories. His costume was added by a very clever graphic designer though!

    “The Worlds of Doctor Who” is available for pre-order now from the Big Finish website. You might also have seen some of my photographs from Big Finish Day 4 in Vortex #61, with a very nice double spread of my images showing what good fun the day was for guests and attendees.

    Pin It
    Categories: LUG Community Blogs

    Dick Turpin: Sale of goods act.

    Planet WolvesLUG - Mon, 28/04/2014 - 09:38
    I do so love these people who spout "Consumer rights at you" and yet have no clue whatsoever that they're talking out their derrière.

    Just had some moron rant at me that;

    Moron: "By law all new goods must come with 1 years warranty!"
    Me: "How many are you looking for?"
    Moron: "None! I'm just telling you you're breaking the law by giving 3 months warranty!"
    Me: "Lucky they are refurbished goods then?"
    Moron: "What? Aye? Erm?"

    Clearly he had not read the email properly or he would have noticed the range of warranties from three, six to twelve months. And the clear wording "Refurbished" on those that were, but what is even more interesting is this person is such a sad sack that they waste theirs and my time to score some sort of personal success by finding something which actually does not exist.

    I suspect he's a Guardian reader? :-)

    Categories: LUG Community Blogs
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