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Adam Trickett: Bog Roll: BigV

Planet HantsLUG - Fri, 25/04/2014 - 18:32

My hosting provider Bytemark started to develop a new virtual server technology some time ago. It's marginally cheaper and marginally more powerful than my current solution. It has many scalability advantages as well but they are not as important to me as the fact I was due to upgrade my existing server and migrating to a new box has many advantages over an in situ upgrade.

I signed up to their free trial and was instantly impressed by both the technology and their customer support. I know there are other good companies so in no way do I want to criticise them, but Bytemark are very good people to work with.

I built my new Debian box, installed the packages I wanted and ported the bits over from the old server over a few evenings. It took only a few hours, and in the process I was able to improve some of the layout and such of the new box and try out newer packages.

This week I updated the DNS records updating the box names and other than forgetting to switch my email server from listening local to listening to the network everything went very well. All that happened was email was backed-up for a few hours before it all arrived.

I've now stripped the old box down to it's minimal running configuration, deleted all my files, and I'm now filling the filesystem up with random junk before deleting the junk and switching the box off so that it can be returned to Bytemark.

Categories: LUG Community Blogs

David Goodwin: Automated twitter compilation up to 25 April 2014

Planet WolvesLUG - Fri, 25/04/2014 - 18:25

Arbitrary tweets made by TheGingerDog up to 25 April 2014

I’ll explain via an #atheist‘s convo with a #theist on FB:

.

I'll explain via an #atheist's convo with a #theist on FB:

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I'll explain via an #atheist's convo with a #theist on FB:

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I'll explain via an #atheist's convo with a #theist on FB:

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I'll explain via an #atheist's convo with a #theist on FB:

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I'll explain via an #atheist's convo with a #theist on FB:

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2014/04/12

  • RT Disclosure: The email and VPN of Belgian intelligence services was exploitable with #HeartBleed until earlier today.

    2014/04/13

  • @wptavern: WordPress 3.8.3 To Fix Quick Draft Dashboard Widget wp.me/pBMYe-5p3 ” <- ah hah. So it wasn’t me doing something wrong 2014/04/11
  • Next up – fix NFS which seems really laggy. 2014/04/11
  • Finally moved back to using a Linux desktop at work. Skype works (thanks Microsoft). Plugins in Thunderbird mimic Postbox (osx mail app). 2014/04/11
  • RT Varnish 4.0.0 released: https://www.varnish-cache.org/lists/pipermail/varnish-announce/2014-April/000696.html #varnish 2014/04/10
  • RT Brilliant – Dilbert’s take on #agile and #prodmgmt

    2014/04/10

  • RT Successful #IrishStateVisit. As luck would have it they had some tarmac left over from a job up the road so did one’s drive for 250 quid. 2014/04/09
  • RT Here’s some really bad Heartbleed bug advice about changing your passwords zite.to/1qycR6Q 2014/04/10
  • Achievement unlocked : pxe/ipxe chain booting with custom installer menu so I can install from remote iso images over http. #linux Bromsgrove, Worcestershire 2014/04/10
  • RT Seeking devop with 2+ years in Heart Bleed 2014/04/09
  • New computer (Intel i5 nuc) should arrive today. Still surprised that Ballicom was £40+(10%) cheaper than Ebuyer. Hopefully they’ll deliver! Bromsgrove, Worcestershire 2014/04/09
  • It seems we are declaring war against next door’s cats – who started tucking into our loaf of bread #cats

    Bromsgrove, Worcestershire 2014/04/08

  • RT Heartbleed Bug In OpenSSL Makes It Worse Than No Encryption At All – www.techdirt.com/articles/20140408/07335926837/heartbleed-bug-openssl-makes-it-worse-than-no-encryption-all.shtml indeed… 2014/04/08
  • RT We found a bug in #OpenSSL heartbleed.com/ #heartbleed Patch now. 2014/04/07
  • RT “Can you fetch me a glass of water please?”
  • *35 mins later*

    “What are you doing!?”,

    “I’m building you a scalable drink delivery system”.

    2014/04/06
  • RT socat -d -d TCP-L:22,reuseaddr,fork SYSTEM:”nc \$SOCAT_PEERADDR 22″ # Confuse people SSHing to your host with a redirect back to theirs. 2014/04/04
  • RT “Singing In The Rain” by @KINGFISHER1972: bit.ly/1dZaABA via @500px #cute

    2014/04/05

  • RT How about setting up a national lottery where all the profits are spent on teaching probability math and statistics to the citizens? 2014/04/05
  • RT Seven reasons why you should swap your screen for a bit of #wildtime this spring bit.ly/1gCne8d

    2014/04/05

  • RT A musician replies to an ad from a restaurant looking for a band to play for free ‘to promote their work’. #genius

    2014/04/04

  • RT Pono: only a man pays for music quality that he can’t hear bit.ly/Pv22Ho 2014/04/05
  • RT Note to self: dont use Opencart RT @ircmaxell: Someone just pointed me out to this. I don’t even know what to think: https://github.com/opencart/opencart/issues/1269 2014/04/04
  • Just to make shopping more fun, the high street is a bit maze like. #bromsgrove

    Bromsgrove, Worcestershire 2014/04/04

  • RT Multiple states investigating breach of Experian database w. 200 million social security numbers: reut.rs/1j5LK1Q via @reuters 2014/04/03
  • Congratulations on being 15 @magma_digital ! Bromsgrove, Worcestershire 2014/04/03
  • “Warning: Using a password on the command line interface can be insecure.” is going to be a popular Google search today #mysql5.6 2014/04/03
  • RT Wow, @GeniusHire – I think you should fire your developers… like YESTERDAY.

    2014/04/02

  • Dilbert has it’s say on MtGox/Bitcoin exchanges etc – www.dilbert.com/fast/2014-04-02/ 2014/04/02
  • “Flappy goat” #sillyPicture

    2014/04/02

  • “Everyone is catching pokeman on Google maps – and I’m just sitting here Goat simulating!”

    2014/04/02

  • RT Anyone using Ubuntu One, grab your stuff now – it’s getting shut down: blog.canonical.com/2014/04/02/shutting-down-ubuntu-one-file-services/ 2014/04/02
  • We appear to have a gardener. Either that or a fairy cut the grass with a pair of scissors or magic. Bromsgrove, Worcestershire 2014/04/02
  • RT I should go to sleep, but I saw that photo of @manytypesoftea earlier so I never will again

    2014/04/02

  • RT @ProfBrianCox Thought you might like this

    2014/04/01

  • RT What Meetings Feel Like For Engineers https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BKorP55Aqvg 2014/04/01
  • RT I don’t always change my desktop wallpaper, but when I do I change it to this.

    2014/04/01

  • Every morning I have to reboot my MacMini as it fails to properly wake up. (I just see a mouse pointer on black b/g)

    Bromsgrove, Worcestershire 2014/04/01

  • “How to burn 800 calories in 30 minutes.” #StupidPictures

    Bromsgrove, Worcestershire 2014/04/01

  • RT So, next month is #Port80 2014….how did *that* come about so quickly?! 2014/04/01
  • It’s 8:40am ish. Right ? #myExcuse Bromsgrove, Worcestershire 2014/04/01
  • Categories: LUG Community Blogs

    Steve Kemp: I've not commented on security for a while

    Planet HantsLUG - Tue, 22/04/2014 - 22:14

    Unless you've been living under a rock, or in a tent (which would make me slightly jealous) you'll have heard about the recent heartbleed attack many times by now.

    The upshot of that attack is that lots of noise was made about hardening things, and there is now a new fork of openssl being developed. Many people have commented about "hardening Debian" in particular, as well as random musing on hardening software. One or two brave souls have even made noises about auditing code.

    Once upon a time I tried to setup a project to audit Debian software. You can still see the Debian Security Audit Project webpages if you look hard enough for them.

    What did I learn? There are tons of easy security bugs, but finding the hard ones is hard.

    (If you get bored some time just pick your favourite Editor, which will be emacs, and look how /tmp is abused during the build-process or in random libraries such as tramp [ tramp-uudecode].)

    These days I still poke at source code, and I still report bugs, but my enthusiasm has waned considerably. I tend to only commit to auditing a package if it is a new one I install in production, which limits my efforts considerably, but makes me feel like I'm not taking steps into the dark. It looks like I reported only three security isseus this year, and before that you have to go down to 2011 to find something I bothered to document.

    What would I do if I had copious free time? I wouldn't audit code. Instead I'd write test-cases for code.

    Many many large projects have rudimentary test-cases at best, and zero coverage at worse. I appreciate writing test-cases is hard, because lots of times it is hard to test things "for real". For example I once wrote a filesystem, using FUSE, there are some built-in unit-tests (I was pretty pleased with that, you could lauch the filesystem with a --test argument and it would invoke the unit-tests on itself. No separate steps, or source code required. If it was installed you could use it and you could test it in-situ). Beyond that I also put together a simple filesystem-stress script, which read/wrote/found random files, computes MD5 hashes of contents, etc. I've since seen similar random-filesystem-stresstest projects, and if they existed then I'd have used them. Testing filesystems is hard.

    I've written kernel modules that have only a single implicit test case: It compiles. (OK that's harsh, I'd usually ensure the kernel didn't die when they were inserted, and that a new node in /dev appeared ;)

    I've written a mail client, and beyond some trivial test-cases to prove my MIME-handling wasn't horrifically bad there are zero tests. How do you simulate all the mail that people will get, and the funky things they'll do with it?

    But that said I'd suggest if you're keen, if you're eager, if you want internet-points, writing test-cases/test-harnesses would be more useful than randomly auditing source code.

    Still what would I know, I don't even have a beard..

    Categories: LUG Community Blogs

    Ubuntu LTSP Video

    Planet SurreyLUG - Tue, 22/04/2014 - 15:15

    Thought this was an excellent video introduction to LTSP.


    Categories: LUG Community Blogs

    Adam Trickett: Bog Roll: Hardware Score Card

    Planet HantsLUG - Tue, 22/04/2014 - 11:40

    Over the years I've had quite a few computers, starting with a Commodore 64 which was an "out of box failure" and had to be replaced straight away.

    The next computer I bought was a Dell that had zero defects on delivery, zero defects within it's 3 year warranty and zero defects after that - to the best of my knowledge it's still working if I were to take it out of storage and boot it up!

    Next came a Dell laptop (re-manufactured) that had zero faults on delivery, zero faults within it's warranty period but since then the bezel has cracked and there are three dead pixels on the screen. Again like the desktop it's still working today many years after it finished active service.

    Then we have a pair of Digital Networks UK desktops (one that I'm using today). Zero faults on delivery, both Iiyama displays failed with the three year warranty and the DVD-ROM on one died and its power-supply has been swapped long after the warranty expired.

    Next I have another Digital Networks UK desktop (used as a server), it's had a power-supply fail under warranty, and after the warranty period: one hard disk; the power-supply and the case fan have had to be replaced. It's also been somewhat prone to overheating under full load most of it's life.

    Finally I have a Novatech laptop, which had a dead batter shortly after the end of the it's one year warranty period. Which I should have realised by law that it should have been a two year warranty and as such should still have been a warranty swap... Otherwise the laptop has and is still fine.

    Categories: LUG Community Blogs

    Debian Bits: Debian welcomes its 2014 GSoC students!

    Planet HantsLUG - Tue, 22/04/2014 - 10:39

    We're excited to announce that 19 students have been selected to work with Debian during the Google Summer of Code this year!

    Here is the list of accepted students and projects:

    As always, you will be able to follow their progress on the SoC coordination mailing-list

    Congratulations to all the students and let's make sure we all have an amazing summer!

    Categories: LUG Community Blogs

    Debian Bits: Debian welcomes its 2014 GSoC students!

    Planet HantsLUG - Tue, 22/04/2014 - 10:00

    We're excited to announce that 19 students have been selected to work with Debian during the Google Summer of Code this year!

    Here is the list of accepted students and projects:

    As always, you will be able to follow their progress on the SoC coordination mailing-list

    Congratulations to all the students and let's make sure we all have an amazing summer!

    Categories: LUG Community Blogs

    Steve Kemp: I was beaten to the punch, but felt nothing

    Planet HantsLUG - Sat, 19/04/2014 - 20:03

    A while back I mented github-backed DNS hosting.

    Turns out NameCast.net does that already, and there is an interesting writeup on the design of something similar, from the same authors in 2009.

    Fun to read.

    In other news applying for jobs is a painful annoyance.

    Should anybody wish to employ an Edinburgh-based system administrator, with a good Debian record, then please do shout at me. Remote work is an option, as is a local office, if you're nearby.

    Now I need to go hide from the sun, lest I get burned again...

    Good news? Going on holiday to Helsinki in a week or so, for Vappu. Anybody local who wants me should feel free to grab me, via the appropriate channels.

    Categories: LUG Community Blogs

    Jono Bacon: Ubuntu 14.04 Is Out!

    Planet WolvesLUG - Thu, 17/04/2014 - 23:58

    My apologies in advance for the shorter blog post about this, but like many other Ubuntu folks, I am absolutely exhausted right now. Everyone, across the board, has been working their collective socks off to make Ubuntu 14.04 LTS a fantastic release on desktop, server, and cloud, and pull together our next iteration of Ubuntu for smart-phones and tablets. Consequently, when the trigger is pulled to share our final product with the world, release day is often less of a blistering and energetic woo-hoo, but more of an exhausted but satisfying oh-yeah (complete with beer firmly clenched in hand).

    I am hugely proud of this release. The last six months have arguably been our busiest yet. No longer are we just working on desktop and server editions of Ubuntu, but we are building for the cloud and full convergence across the client. No longer are we “just” pulling together the fruits of upstream software projects but we are building our own platform too; the Ubuntu SDK, developer eco-system, charm store, image-based updates, push notifications, app lifecycle, and more. While the work has been intense and at times frantic, it has always been measured and carefully executed. Much of this has been thanks to many of our most under-thanked people; the members of our tremendous QA and CI teams.

    Today, tomorrow, and for weeks to come our users, the press, the industry, and others will assess our work in Ubuntu 14.04 across these different platforms, and I am very confident they will love what they see. Ubuntu 14.04 embodies the true spirit of Ubuntu; innovation, openness, and people.

    But as we wait to see the reviews let’s take a moment for each other. Now is a great time to reach out to each other and those Ubuntu folks you know (and don’t know) and share some kudos, some thanks, and some great stories. Until we get to the day where machines make software, today software is made by people and great software is built by great people.

    Thanks everyone for every ounce of effort you fed into Ubuntu and our many flavors. We just took another big leap forward towards our future.

    Categories: LUG Community Blogs

    Adam Trickett: Bog Roll: New Boxes

    Planet HantsLUG - Thu, 17/04/2014 - 12:13

    At long last I've decided. I've ordered a shiny new DNUK Deskstar, desktop PC to replace my current DNUK Workstar system which has reached the end of it's useful life as a front line system. The new box is at least four times better in every respect: it has four cores compared with one; 8 GiB of RAM instead of 2 GiB; ten times the hard-disk capacity (which is also faster) and a solid state drive; hardware virtualisation and a drastically superior graphics card. It's also a Intel based system, all my previous DNUK boxes have had AMD processors. It will cost more money than the system it replaces, but a system of similar price (accepting inflation) would not have been sufficiently faster or balanced to make it worth buying.

    I've also started the process of migrating this server off the current Bytemark virtual server onto their new BigV platform. The new system is faster, more scalable and slightly cheaper. It also allows me a pain-free upgrade to the latest version of Debian.

    Categories: LUG Community Blogs

    Dick Turpin: Hi-Spec

    Planet WolvesLUG - Thu, 17/04/2014 - 10:51
    Customer: "I need a Hi-Spec laptop something really stable for our business."
    Me: "Well we have another customer who is in your line of work, I supplied them yesterday with one for just under £2K"
    Customer: "Yes, the Director was thinking about £1K"
    Me: "OK let me get a quote together for that and the other work you want doing."

    A few minutes later.

    Customer: "The budget for the laptop is £600.00."

    And would you like me to throw in a box of crayons, some play-doh and a painting by numbers book? Hi-Spec pfffft
    Categories: LUG Community Blogs
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